Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

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Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Global Administrator »

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Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Bought this very attractive and clean 4 margin 1d Black on entire letter, sent from Edinburgh June 18 (noted thus inside) also with crisp JUNE 18 - 1840 cds on reverse. (The month after issue.) Seller stated it was Plate 4 – have no idea on that.

Anyway. Googled both HALFLAKELL and INCHIE BRIDGE and oddly, got zero matches on either. Or any kind of match as to location. Not even a pub or library or cemetary etc. It is as if neither ever existed! :lol: :lol: :lol:

Even tried INSLIE BRIDGE and also drew a blank.

Will add zero to the selling price, whatever it reads, but intrigued me as to why no matches.

I ASSUME they are Scottish locations – maybe I am reading them wrong? However, both seem to be more legibly written than in most hands of that time.

Any of our sleuths have any input on this one? :mrgreen:

Glen




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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by satsuma »

Halflakell was a locality in Edinburgh
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Halflakill
Halflakill

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Global Administrator »

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Thanks - you are far more use than Doctor Google who has nothing of use as I posted. :lol:

Maybe it was a farm, or the name of a house or property etc?

https://www.google.com/search?q=halflakell+scotland&source=l ... AHoECAEQAA
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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by lesbootman »

It looks like Inshie Bridge, Halflakill to me ... but that means nothing to Google either. Inskie Bridge likewise.

It may be that the bridge is long gone or that they were using a local nickname for it.

I guess we'll probably never know.
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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by satsuma »

Actually further research indicates that while Halflakill was in the general Edinburgh region, it was closer to Gorebridge.

Fushie Bridge over Gore Water appears to make the location indisputable.
Fushie Bridge
Fushie Bridge

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Global Administrator »

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Well deciphered - yes FUSHIE seems the jackpot guess. :)

Even so, Uncle Google does not care!

https://www.google.com/search?q=Fushie+Bridge+halflakell&tbm ... -b-d&hl=en
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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Allanswood »

Halflakill was a house/property.

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by OldDuffer1 »

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Not far from us!

"Fushiebridge is a location and former settlement in Midlothian, located on the A7 trunk road a half-mile (1 km) south of Gorebridge and a mile (1.5 km) northwest of North Middleton. The bridge took the road over a stream which is a tributary of the Gore Water, powering the mill at Catcune.

The First Edition Ordnance Survey map shows an Inn and Post Office here, together with a number of houses, now all gone. Later maps show a curling pond. There was railway station at Catcune to the east, together with a complex railway junction which connect local collieries, fore clay works and limeworks to the Waverley Line."


https://www.scottish-places.info/towns/townfirst4645.html

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Global Administrator »

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About an obscure as you can get, for a destination! To a tiny little farm, near a flyspeck on the map that no longer exists.

The 1d Black whizzes have just confirmed the stamp is Plate 4 - I'll price it for $1000 less than SG price for a superb piece -

https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=10&t=22503&start=1742

Glen
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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by norvic »

FUSHIEBRIDGE
village with railway station, LNER on Gorewater, Midlothian, 13 miles SE of Edinburgh by Rail

(Bartholomew's Gazeteer, 1930s)


Google.com came up with 4 hits or more on Halflakell, once I remembered the second L. Archive.org has an entry but The National Library of Scotland has the Scottish Post Office Directory (a bit like Kelly's only more so, by the look of it).

National Library of Scotland Scottish Postal Directory.
National Library of Scotland Scottish Postal Directory.
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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Allanswood »

I have found an old 1843 map that shows a substantial property in the same area, near Borthwick Castle called "Halflaw Kiln".

If you write that with a Scottish 'accent', then...!


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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Global Administrator »

Allanswood wrote:
15 May 2021 22:29
I have found an old 1843 map that shows a substantial property in the same area, near Borthwick Castle called "Halflaw Kiln".

If you write that with a Scottish 'accent', then...!



Bloody Scots - they cannot even agree on how to spell their surnames on that property in this era!

Had 5 or 10 goes at it!

I think they settled on Lockhart so they did not get headaches thinking about it too much!

https://scotlandsplaces.gov.uk/digital-volumes/ordnance-surv ... lume-37/17


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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by gavin-h »

Global Administrator wrote:
15 May 2021 22:47
Bloody Scots - they cannot even agree on how to spell their surnames on that property in this era!

:lol: :lol: :lol:

A number of reasons for that - firstly, many of those names and place names had their roots in Scots Gaelic and over time different transliterations into something more anglicised would have taken place.

Secondly, different historic clans would have subtly different pronunciations and the elders / wise men / literate few would have written them down accordingly.

Thirdly, standard spellings only really came about as a result of the publication of dictionaries, post office directories and the like and for names and places like these, there would have been little if any chance of their being recorded in a standard way.

Fourthly, as touched on above, literacy and formal education would have been limited to a lucky few and they would have learned different rules from their individual teachers (if indeed they learned rules and not individual spellings).

Fifthly, the "civil service" would have largely been English-speaking only (and often English) rather than Scots and hence they would have been writing what they heard as a "foreign language".

This is common in many countries - many surnames in the USA for example are French, German, Swedish etc in origin, but were only ever written down by immigration staff at Ellis Island, so for example, Monsieur Durier became Mister Duryea and his descendants retained that "new" spelling.

I'm sure Australian history has many similar examples if you look back 150-200 years. :idea:

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Global Administrator »

gavin-h wrote:
16 May 2021 03:36

I'm sure Australian history has many similar examples if you look back 150-200 years. :idea:

No, we got smart and abbreviate absolutely every name down to one or two syllables.

No confusion then.

Well to our Prime Minister Scott Morrison we accord due dignity and reverence, and give him TWO syllables -

SCOMO

True. His Universal monicker here. :mrgreen:




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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Allanswood »

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I think the adress is more local Gaelic than Queens English.

Fushie is also a Gaelic word.

It may refer to the modern Currie Bridge.

The map I looked at was an English ordinance (military?) map.

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by OldDuffer1 »

Yes, the anglicisation of Gaelic names can lead to many versions.

My (lovely) wife, who dabbles in genealogy, was investigating a family name originally from the Gaelic: she came by more than 300 spelling variations!

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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by Allanswood »

I have found another old map, this time an NBR railway map - Edinburgh to Hawick line - and it shows that after Gorebridge Station is Fushie Bridge (not a station), then Borthwick Castle ruins.


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Re: Anyone here experienced with tiny Scottish town names in 1840?

Post by satsuma »

Why not show what you've found?
Is this it?
old map fushiebridge
old map fushiebridge

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