Stamps and covers from NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Panterra wrote:THE 1980 HURRICANE:

Hurricane Ofa caused a lot of destruction near the start of 1980, and wiped out the passionfruit crop (Niue's biggest export apart from stamps!) so Finbar immediately swung into action to make more money with this issue:
Image
Niue 1980 Hurricane relief. The "10th anniversary of first moon landing" set of three from the previous year, now overprinted in silver with a 2c per stamp premium.

I earlier showed some other thematic stamps with this overprint, but of course, Finbar HAD to make sure every nice commemorative was surcharged, to ensure everybody keen buys an extra set.

The silver overprint is quite hard to see, no doubt intentionally so as not to ruin the attractive designs, and I had to fade the colour down a lot here so you can see it. The actual stamps are quite a lot brighter in intensity than this.

SG 324 - 326.


THE PIGEON & THE ANT:
Punapa Veseaga of Hakupu village wrote:One day, a man decided to go shooting pigeons for food. When he arrived at the forest where Le trees are plenty, he made a sound resembling a pigeon’s voice when calling for a mate. “Prrrrr Prrrrrr.” Immediately one or two birds came flying and started pecking at the Le berries and at the same time defecating the seeds eaten on the day before. The man had seen one of the pigeons and was just about to pull the trigger, when an ant came to the pigeon’s rescue by biting the man’s legs.

This caused him to hop here and there and he cursed the ant for revealing his presence to the pigeon. Hearing the commotion down below, the pigeon took flight. The lucky pigeon and the others took off for their dear lives.

The Pigeon called back to Ant in their language,
“Thank you friend, for saving my life. Prrrrr, Prrrrrr, Prrrrr.”
During the month of May, Macaranga ( Le ) berries become mature and ripen. Pigeons take a liking to them as a delicacy. This leads the pigeons to grow yellow and fat. When a pigeon is shot at that time, from its perch, and falls to the ground, it could burst because of its extra weight.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Yet another attractive set from the very prolific Period 6, guaranteed to open wallets by effectively trumping several topical themes at one time:

Image
Niue 1985 Audubon birds set of five.


Niue issued this attractive set on 15th April 1985 to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the birth of John James Audubon.

SG 581 - 585.

As well as the attractive set of five, Kenny also managed to fleece collectors a second time, by having each of the five stamps now printed in a souvenir sheet with just a single stamp, but all now re-valued to $1.75, and without the commemorative inscription. I'm showing one of these sheets; the other four are similar:

Image
Niue 1985 Audubon souvenir sheet. There were five such sheets, each $1.75.

John James Audubon (Jean-Jacques Audubon) (1785 – 1851) was a French-American ornithologist, naturalist, and painter. He was notable for his expansive studies to document all types of American birds and for his detailed illustrations that depicted the birds in their natural habitats. His major work, a color-plate book entitled The Birds of America (1827–1839), is considered one of the finest ornithological works ever completed. Audubon identified 25 new species.

Jean-Jacques Audubon was born in Les Cayes in the French colony of Saint-Domingue (now Haiti) on his father's sugar plantation. He was the illegitimate (or natural) son of Lieutenant Jean Audubon, a French naval officer (and privateer) from the south of Brittany, and his mistress Jeanne Rabine, a 27-year-old chambermaid from Les Touches in the same Province of Brittany (now in the modern region Pays de la Loire). They named the boy Jean Rabin. His mother died when the boy was a few months old, as she had suffered from tropical disease since arriving on the island. His father already had two mixed-race children by his mulatto housekeeper, Sanitte (described as a quadroon, meaning she was three-quarters European in ancestry). Following Jeanne Rabin's death, Jean Audubon renewed his relationship with Sanitte and had another daughter by her, named Rose. Sanitte also took care of the infant boy Jean.

The senior Audubon had risen from his early days as a cabin boy, and commanded ships. During the American Revolution, he had been imprisoned by the British Empire. After his release, he helped the American cause. He had long worked to save money and secure his family's future with real estate. Due to slave unrest in the Caribbean, in 1789 he sold part of his plantation in Saint-Domingue and purchased a 284-acre farm called Mill Grove, 20 miles from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to diversify his investments. Rising unrest in Saint-Domingue from African slaves, who greatly outnumbered French colonists, convinced Jean Audubon to return to France, where he became a member of the Republican Guard. In 1791 he arranged for his natural children Jean and Rose, who was very light-skinned, to be delivered to him in France.

The children were raised in Couëron, near Nantes, France, by Audubon and his wife Anne Moynet Audubon, whom he had married years before. In 1794 they formally adopted both the natural children to regularize their legal status. They renamed the boy Jean-Jacques Fougère Audubon. When Audubon, at age 18, boarded ship for immigration to the United States in 1803, he changed his name to an anglicized form: John James Audubon.

From his earliest days, Audubon had an affinity for birds. "I felt an intimacy with them...bordering on frenzy [that] must accompany my steps through life." His father encouraged his interest in nature:

John Audubon wrote:He would point out the elegant movement of the birds, and the beauty and softness of their plumage. He called my attention to their show of pleasure or sense of danger, their perfect forms and splendid attire. He would speak of their departure and return with the seasons.
In France during the chaotic years of the French Revolution and its aftermath, the younger Audubon grew up to be a handsome and gregarious man. He played flute and violin, and learned to ride, fence, and dance. A great walker, he loved roaming in the woods, often returning with natural curiosities, including birds' eggs and nests, of which he made crude drawings. His father planned to make a seaman of his son. At twelve, Audubon went to military school and became a cabin boy. He quickly found out that he was susceptible to seasickness and not fond of mathematics or navigation. After failing the officer's qualification test, Audubon ended his incipient naval career. He was cheerfully back on solid ground and exploring the fields again, focusing on birds.

In 1803, his father obtained a false passport so that Audubon could go to the United States to avoid conscription in the Napoleonic Wars.

Audubon caught yellow fever upon arrival in New York City. The ship's captain placed him in a boarding house run by Quaker women. They nursed Audubon to recovery and taught him English, including the Quaker form of using "thee" and "thou", otherwise then anachronistic. He traveled with the family's Quaker lawyer to the Audubon family farm Mill Grove. The 115 hectare homestead is located on the Perkiomen Creek a few miles from Valley Forge.

Audubon lived with the tenants in the two-story stone house, in an area that he considered a paradise.

John Audubon wrote:Hunting, fishing, drawing, and music occupied my every moment; cares I knew not, and cared naught about them.
Studying his surroundings, Audubon quickly learned the ornithologist's rule:
John Audubon wrote:The nature of the place—whether high or low, moist or dry, whether sloping north or south, or bearing tall trees or low shrubs—generally gives hint as to its inhabitants.
His father hoped that the lead mines on the property could be commercially developed, as lead was an essential component of bullets. This could provide his son with a profitable occupation. Audubon met his neighbor William Bakewell, the owner of the nearby estate "Fatland Ford", whose daughter Lucy he married five years later. The two young people shared many common interests, and early on began to spend time together, exploring the natural world around them.

Audubon set about to study American birds, determined to illustrate his findings in a more realistic manner than most artists did then. He began conducting the first known bird-banding on the continent: he tied yarn to the legs of Eastern Phoebes and determined that they returned to the same nesting spots year after year. He also began drawing and painting birds, and recording their behavior. After an accidental fall into a creek, Audubon contracted a severe fever. He was nursed and recovered at Fatland Ford, with Lucy at his side. Risking conscription in France, Audubon returned in 1805 to see his father and ask permission to marry. He also needed to discuss family business plans. While there, he met the naturalist and physician Charles-Marie D'Orbigny, who improved Audubon's taxidermy skills and taught him scientific methods of research. Although his return ship was overtaken by an English privateer, Audubon and his hidden gold coins survived the encounter.

Audubon resumed his bird studies and created his own nature museum, perhaps inspired by the great museum of natural history created by Charles Willson Peale in Philadelphia. Peale's bird exhibits were considered scientifically advanced. Audubon's room was brimming with birds' eggs, stuffed raccoons and opossums, fish, snakes, and other creatures. He had become proficient at specimen preparation and taxidermy.

Audubon had great respect for Native Americans:
John Audubon wrote:Whenever I meet Indians, I feel the greatness of our Creator in all its splendor, for there I see the man naked from His hand and yet free from acquired sorrow.
Audubon was honoured with stamps from numerous countries, including a very controversial set from his birthplace, Haiti:

Image
Haiti 1975 Audubon Bird Paintings, two stamps from the approximately 80 in this very long and attractive set.

Image
John Audubon, here shown on the 1975 perforated souvenir sheet, from the land of his birth, Haiti.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Greaden »

Panterra wrote:
Panterra wrote:THE 1980 HURRICANE:

Hurricane Ofa caused a lot of destruction near the start of 1980, and wiped out the passionfruit crop (Niue's biggest export apart from stamps!) so Finbar immediately swung into action to make more money with this issue:
Image
Niue 1980 Hurricane relief. The "10th anniversary of first moon landing" set of three from the previous year, now overprinted in silver with a 2c per stamp premium.

I earlier showed some other thematic stamps with this overprint, but of course, Finbar HAD to make sure every nice commemorative was surcharged, to ensure everybody keen buys an extra set.

The silver overprint is quite hard to see, no doubt intentionally so as not to ruin the attractive designs, and I had to fade the colour down a lot here so you can see it. The actual stamps are quite a lot brighter in intensity than this.
So wait, did I get this right? Niue is officially concerned about hurricanes on the moon?

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

:lol:

And now, another charming and attractive set from Period 6:

Image
Niue 1984 AUSIPEX International Stamp Exhibition, Melbourne: mint stamps plus souvenir sheet.

A total of eight values & three souvenir sheets appeared for this prestigious event, where Mr Kenny possibly had a stall to sell them. This almost sounds like over-kill, but the fauna are too cute to resist!

Can anyone who attended confirm this, please?
The Independent (newspaper) wrote:World's smallest state aims to become the first smoke-free paradise island


It is the world's smallest self-governing state, with a population of just 1,400 and few resources other than fish and coconuts. But the South Pacific island of Niue believes it can set an example by becoming the first country in the world to go smoke-free.

There are about 250 smokers on Niue, a speck of coral with a GDP of barely NZ$6,000 (£2,280) per person, and local officials say the cost of treating smoking-related illnesses is placing a heavy strain on the health budget.

Sitaleki Finau, Niue's director of health, is backing a bill to prohibit smoking and the sale of tobacco in public areas and private homes. The bill has been presented to parliament, but the government has not yet signed up to it. Dr Finau said he expected a ban to face stiff opposition from the tobacco industry and other commercial interests. But he urged MPs to be bold and vote for it.

"Small countries are allowed to be ambitious," he said yesterday. "If a small country can do this, then big countries will start thinking. Imagine what that means." The government would lose revenue from tobacco taxes but that would be more than offset by savings in the health budget, he said.

Like many countries, Niue – which translates as "behold the coconut" – has banned smoking in government offices and public buildings. But outlawing tobacco would be a radical step – particularly on an island so relaxed that, according to one saying, the dogs chase the cats at walking pace.

One village, Tuapa, has already declared itself smoke-free. Tobacco is not sold there, and villagers refrain from smoking in public and during ceremonies.

Dr Finau said the government would have to consider whether a ban infringed smokers' rights. "There has been mixed reaction," he said. "It's one of those difficult political issues, because there are commercial interests against it, and the government has to look at it in relation to tax. A tobacco-free country sounds pretty straightforward and simple, but there are some complex issues involved."

No date has been set for a vote, which could be two years away. Niue, 1,375 miles north-east of Auckland and 312 miles from Tonga, its nearest neighbour, is a former British protectorate. Britain gave it to New Zealand as a reward for the latter's contribution to the Anglo-Boer War, but since 1974 it has been independent "in free association" with Wellington.

Those who live on the island, 100 miles square, regard it as a South Pacific paradise. Beaches are heavenly, crime is non-existent, and the plentiful seafood includes crabs so large that people walk them on leashes. The locals serenade each other on guitars while watching tropical sunsets.

Niue's problem is that, despite all that, everyone is leaving. The population is in steep decline, and some believe it has dropped below a sustainable level.

When Niue was granted independence, its people were given New Zealand citizenship and the chance to emigrate – an offer that now threatens Niue's survival. There are 20,000 Niueans in New Zealand, and those left behind intermittently debate whether the island should rejoin its former colonial ruler.

Successive governments have failed to lure expatriate Niueans home. The island's isolation and lack of resources make for a fragile economy and Niue is heavily dependent on New Zealand aid and foreign remittances. Its main export is taro, a root vegetable. The capital, Alofi, has two shops.

If Niue becomes smoke-free, it may lose another 250 residents. New Zealand's anti-smoking laws are not quite so draconian.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by ewen s »

Good luck to Panterra and Princestamps for your talks tonight on Niue. Hope it all goes well and you convert a few more :)

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Just home from the Stamp Club NIUE evening, which was a great success. It was made even more memorable by a woman who had visited Niue several times attending, and after the stamps part of the evening finished, while we were having supper, she showed slides of her visits there. In a dark room with the enlarged slides projected on the wall, it felt almost like being there!

Princestamps discussed and showed stamps up to the end of Period 5 (1977) then I took over and showed the Finbar Kenny era, Period 6 (1977 - c. 1995). And others showed a few gems they had too. Finally, Princestamps showed Period 8 (2009 to date.) Sadly, Period 1 and Period 7 were not represented during the evening.

During the previous several days, I had compiled a single-page handout brochure on Niue (mostly with data from this thread) and photocopied on both sides including lots of illustrations of stamps, so everyone was able to take one of these brochures home with them. I am confident many will take up Niue collecting, especially as the catalogue values are so cheap.

Anyone wanting one of these brochures could contact me. I'd suggest send some stamps or FDCs in trade.

Image
Niue 1937 Coronation with Wellington, New Zealand postmark on the 1d stamp!!!!!

Image
Niue 1980 Rowland Hill stamps overprinted for "Zeapex" stamp exhibition in Auckland. The rare stamps depicted are thought to be from the collection of Finbar Kenny, revealed as being a big-spending philatelist, who used a lot of his wealth to invest in expensive rarities.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

The talk went remarkably well, and we learnt that Niue was a place where honesty is king. There is a bar called the Wash away which is opened for a few hours each evening, theres no bar person. You merely help yourself to the drinks and leave the money at the bar!!!!

My guess is a local comes past at closing time, scoops up the money and then at opening time replenishes any bottles, washes the glasses, opens it up and goes off.

There is also a village there where Tuvaluans live and they operate a lucrative piggery (Pigs are popular for Island customs, weddings, funerals, feasts etc).

The sea is really clear, but the islands have hardly any reefs and its easy to get blown out to sea in a rip. The airport has the people come down to meet most aircraft and you are welcomed to the island. Just some of the great stuff we found out on Monday.

The island is periodically lashed by nasty cyclones. The Islanders resilience usually means things are rebuilt quickly. Many homes are built out of coral and limestone, with burnt coral mixed with lime to make a mortar. These homes resist the cyclones better, bust still you find shells of homes throughout the island and cyclones usually facilitate a rash of migrants to New Zealand. The population is 1400 and falling, over 20,000 Niueans live in New Zealand, virtually all in South Auckland, Porirua and low income suburbs in Christchurch and Dunedin. Niueans are much friendlier and more accommodating than most people.

On Niue they bend over backwards to help you have a good time. Unga hunting is a great sport, they make special traps with coconuts to catch them and they make a tasty meal, surprisingly expensive at the Maketi, a unga cost $25 or more, but most locals just catch them. Theres a way to pick em up though as they can break off your fingers easily!!!

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

Also bought a few more postal items to show you.

Image

The two covers on the left are postal, top is a cover sent to New Zealand in 1946 with an 8d rate made up of 4 x 2d Peace overprints, date on cover is not First day. Other cover shows the 1971 birds set used with a late 1972 Postmark.

Other side are two FDC's the 1970 Airport set and 1969 Christmas FDC. Both have New Zealand style FDC postmarks. Thse are late period 3 and period 4 items.

Image

This image shows both 1974 (Period 5) set covers, the self government at top and Captain Cook at bottom, Middle is a period 6 item showing the 1980 South Pacific Arts festival set. This festival encouraged many stamp issues and even Fiji and Papua New Guinea issued coins. You will notice a different type of post mark was used in the Kennie period for this item.
Last edited by Princestamps on 15 Jul 2017 22:16, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

THE 1980 HURRICANE:

Hurricane Ofa caused a lot of destruction near the start of 1980, and wiped out the passionfruit crop (Niue's biggest export apart from stamps!) so Finbar immediately swung into action to make more money with this issue:

Image
Niue 1980 Xmas set from 1979 overprinted in silver with a 2-cent premium for "Hurricane Relief."

Some of the other stamps that were overprinted at the same time were shown earlier in this thread. The basic stamps are Finbar's usual high-quality Period 6 beauties, reproducing Old Master paintings of Jesus' birth.

Hard to fathom what a mere two-cents would do to help the victims, but it DID guarantee that many more full sets would be sold!

[quote="Stephen Levine, in "Niue in Review: Issues and Events, 1 July 1989 to 30 June 1990", "]Early on February 4, TCWC Nadi issued a gale warning for Niue while Ofa was located to the northwest of the island, with gale force winds forecast to occur over the island nation during the next day. During that day after the system had accelerated and moved further towards the south-southeast than had been expected, TCWC Nadi issued a hurricane warning at 1800 UTC and reported that Ofa appeared to be heading directly for Niue. At around 1800 UTC that day Niue started to experience strong and gusty winds, before it was affected by destructive hurricane force winds for several hours during February 5. At around 0300 UTC, as Ofa's eye passed about 30 km to west of the island, Niue recorded its lowest ever recorded pressure of 962.4 hPa. During that day the system continued to move towards the south-southeast and lost its intensity, the hurricane warning, was gradually replaced with a damaging swell and a strong wind warning.

Cyclone Ofa caused very severe damage on Niue with gigantic seas resulting from storm surge swept over the northern and western coastal areas. Virtually all landings to the sea were washed away or damaged badly by huge seas. There was considerable damage to hospital buildings, the island's hotel, roads, houses, churches and other facilities for the public. Due to the damage to the power lines, electricity was out for about 24 hours. Most of the islands private water supply tanks were contaminated by salt water and declared unsuitable for drinking. In the aftermath of the cyclone, Royal New Zealand Air Force flights brought in emergency medical supplies, generators, water and fuel pumps, and food to Niue while a New Zealand navy vessel, the Endeavour, delivered additional foodstuffs, as well as building and plumbing materials, two weeks after the storm.
[/quote]

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by warm »

Good news that the Niue meeting went so well.

Just for completeness here is my copy of SG1.
Image
Another interesting set is this one overprinted 'INVALID'

I am sure that this is in fact an invalid overprint in more ways than one
.
However some member may have actual details of this overprint 'issue'.
Image
Image
Image
Enjoy

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Lundy »

Hi all,

My Niue collection is pretty poor but I do like my one on piece example which I scanned below

Image

SG9 I assume, with a nice 25 Dec 1902 cancellation and SG9c no stop variety on the last stamp

Thanks

Lundy :D

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Another beautiful gem from the much-maligned Period 6:

Image
Niue 1984 10th anniversary of autonomy, the high-value minisheet.

Niue issued this beautiful stamp on 19th October 1984, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of self-government.

Here is the high-value souvenir sheet. The design is the same as the 70c stamp from the set: Premier Rex receiving constitutional document from NZ Governor-General, Sir Denis Blundell.


SG MS572.
Tina from Alofi Tokelau village wrote:The Rat & the Octopus

The Rat, the Land Crab and the Plover built a canoe. When they finished building the canoe, they asked each other what they would do if their canoe were to capsize.
The Rat said, “If the boat capsizes I will swim.”
The Plover said,” If the boat capsizes I will fly.”
The crab said, “If the boat capsizes I will sink.”

At once they went down to the sea. Then when the boat overturned the Plover flew, the Crab sank, but the Rat swam. The Rat swam until he reached the reef, but there he almost died.
The Octopus came by and he offered to rescue Rat. He placed Rat on top of his head. The Octopus crawled up carefully until they reached the shore and then he returned again to the sea.

However, the Rat called down to Octopus, “Feel the top of your head!”
The Rat felt the top of his head and found that it had been soiled by Rat. Octopus was very angry and he promised that he will never forget the trickery played on him.

Because of this the Octopus wrath has lasted down to this very day.

It is believed that the trick to catch an octopus is to make a lure fashioned with a spotted white cowry shell thus making it look like a Rat complete with false legs, false arms and a false tail.
The lure is placed in the hand and dangled or danced from a string just below the water surface. The movements create sounds only Octopus can identify as that being made by a rat.
An octopus can crawl out quickly and pounce on the lure and cling fast as if to throttle it to death allowing the Fisherman enough time to catch his prey.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Back on 26th August 2013, I posted a photo of Niue's 1983 Commonwealth Day set.

Rather than print new stamps, in 1985 Finbar carefully overprinted all the unsold leftovers, and also "corrected" the premier's name (as he had given himself a knighthood in the meantime!):

ImageNiue 1985 Pacific Islands Conference.

The designs:

70c ... Premier Sir Robert Rex.

70c ... HMS Resolution & HMS Adventure off Niue, 1774.

70c ... Passion flower.

70c ... Limes.

SG 595 - 598.

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Niue SG 1 - is the overprint genuine?

Post by lakatoi lover »

I have copy of what appears to be Niue SG1, but I am wondering whether the overprint is genuine?

To me, the overprint seems to be very blurred or over inked.

Image

Image

Comments appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Bill

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Global Administrator »

warm wrote:Good news that the Niue meeting went so well.

Just for completeness here is my copy of SG1.
Image
Lakatoi Lover .. appears similar to how SG1 looks above, but as it is readily faked you'd need a NZ Cert I'd suggest. :mrgreen:

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

It's the violet Niue NZ postmark that guarantees the genuineness of that SG 1. I am likewise dubious about the "mint" ones!

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Re: Niue SG 1 - is the overprint genuine?

Post by warm »

lakatoi lover wrote:I have copy of what appears to be Niue SG1, but I am wondering whether the overprint is genuine?

To me, the overprint seems to be very blurred or over inked.

Image

Image

Comments appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Bill
Bill
I haven't seen an over-inked one before.
It doesn't really look right to me.
I will look later and see if mine has any ink showing through the back.
Tony

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Re: Niue SG 1 - is the overprint genuine?

Post by Panterra »

lakatoi lover wrote:I have copy of what appears to be Niue SG1, but I am wondering whether the overprint is genuine?

To me, the overprint seems to be very blurred or over inked.

Comments appreciated.

Thanks in advance.

Bill
Bill, your SG 1 looks good to me. The details on producing this stamp (in "Postage Stamps of NZ", volume 5, page 425 - 426) show that the stamps were overprinted with a rubber stamp. As the overprint needed to be in dark green, green ink was obtained and placed on a stamp-pad that had previously had violet ink on it. This is the reason why the actual overprinted stamps always appear to show too much ink, and why the colour appears to be a dark turquoise (the newly-added green mixing with the extant violet.) I see there is also a turquoise spot part-way up your stamp, and this agrees with the idea of too much ink on the stamp-pad, so a bit was splashed by the enthusiastic banging of the rubber-stamp into the over-soggy ink-pad.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

A beautiful minisheet from the often-maligned Period 6, and using the ever-popular "Paintings by classic Old Masters" theme:

Image
Niue 1983 Christmas set, in souvenir sheet.
The 5 stamps were also issued in regular sheets, but those did not have the 3c premium added as do those in this sheet.

Niue issued this beautiful set of five stamps featuring Old Master paintings of the birth of Jesus, for use on Christmas card mail. Date of issue was 25th November 1983. Here is the set in souvenir sheet format, where each stamp has a 3c premium, not found on the stamps from regular sheets.

All show paintings by Raphael, as that year is the 500th anniversary of his birth.

Paintings shown are:


30c ... "The Gavargh Madonna".

40c ... "Madonna of the Granduca".

58c ... "Madonna of the Goldfinch".

70c ... "The Holy Family of Francis I".

83c ... "The Holy Family with Saints".

SG MS 508.

===


Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (1483 – 1520) better known simply as Raphael, was an Italian painter and architect of the High Renaissance. His work is admired for its clarity of form and ease of composition and for its visual achievement of the Neoplatonic ideal of human grandeur. Together with Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci, he forms the traditional trinity of great masters of that period.

Raphael was enormously productive, running an unusually large workshop, and despite his death at 37, a large body of his work remains. Many of his works are found in the Vatican Palace, where the frescoed Raphael Rooms were the central, and the largest, work of his career. The best known work is The School of Athens in the Vatican Stanza della Segnatura. After his early years in Rome much of his work was executed by his workshop from his drawings, with considerable loss of quality. He was extremely influential in his lifetime, though outside Rome his work was mostly known from his collaborative printmaking. After his death, the influence of his great rival Michelangelo was more widespread until the 18th and 19th centuries, when Raphael's more serene and harmonious qualities were again regarded as the highest models. His career falls naturally into three phases and three styles, first described by Giorgio Vasari: his early years in Umbria, then a period of about four years (from 1504–1508) absorbing the artistic traditions of Florence, followed by his last hectic and triumphant twelve years in Rome, working for two Popes and their close associates.

Folituki Talima from Tuapa village wrote:In days long gone Niue was divided into two separate tribes known as Motu and Tafiti. The villages from Alofi Tokelau going north to Liku were called Motu and the rest of the villages going south around the island were called Tafiti.

The two tribes never liked each other hence warfare always broke out.

There was belief even to this day that a talisman known as the Tokamotu was declared the God and who ever held it would always have good harvests and would win the wars.

Tokamotu was treated like a God by the people of Tuapa. Tokamotu was kept in a small purposely built house on top of a rock foundation in a place located just above Tuapa village. This small house was built of timber just big enough to house a small umu, like a fire place.

Hanging down from the roof just above the fire place was suspended the Tokamotu.

The belief was that if the Tokamotu was warm a good omen and good luck would descend on the village and its people.

In the times of harvest there was plenty of food. In the times of warfare the village Kau and the Toa would return home victorious.

When the chiefs prepared to fight or to defend their village, the Tokamotu was carefully removed from the roof and taken down to be immersed in water to cool down while prayers were offered to the Gods to strike down the enemies and their fighters be returned home safely.

One day, all this ritual stopped.
The village people discovered their Tokamotu gone. Stolen!!!

Sadness and anger descended upon the village.

The guard Togafakahili, the fire keeper from the village, was entrusted with the role of keeping Tokamotu warm and safe. He forgot the honour bestowed upon him. He revealed the secrets of the village’s fortunes in the wars to the two Kulatea brothers from Hakupu. The two brothers plotted to walk inland and to secretly enter the sanctuary and remove the Tokamotu.


The Tokamotu was taken down, carried down to the sea coast where they hid until night time and then safely travelled to safety and home.

To this day, the people who removed the Tokamotu are believed to have been cursed. As a man from the village of Tuapa I would dearly love to have the Tokamotu returned to Tuapa, the little house rebuilt and the Tokamotu hanging and watching quietly from inside.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Panterra wrote:THE 1980 HURRICANE:

Image
Niue 1980 Captain Cook stamps of the previous year, overprinted "Hurricane Relief + 2c" in silver. You need to look closely to see the silver overprint.

All up, 21 different stamps were overprinted for Hurricane Relief, each with a 2c surcharge. Presumably part of the funds raised went to putting storm shelters on the Philatelic Bureau at Alofi, a.k.a. the local branch of Kenny International Corp.


Sadly when I posted that photo of the Captain Cook set with Hurricane Relief overprint, I had misplaced the top value of the set. Here it is now for completeness:

Image
Niue 1980 Hurricane Relief silver overprint on the top value of the four Captain Cook stamps from the previous year.

The stamp shows the assassination of Captain Cook in Hawai'i (maybe a photo taken by a Hawaiian paparazzi there at the time?)

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

Moving back to a slightly earlier and more fulfilling period, one can see these beauties. The first item is a 1967 Decimal currency FDC except it only has the 4 arms values and the two highest value overprints

Image

The Arms stamps, despite the heavy foxing are the more scarce rough perf versions of 1967. This cover is one of the more desirable later Niue items. The design of it too, is also suggestive of the similar design for New Zealand 1967 Decimal currency items.


The other cover is the 1976 definitive set, which came out just one year before the big changeover to Finnbar Kennie era items. Its quite interesting in how 10 stamps have been arranged to have only 3 postmarks. Compared to earlier covers, this design is a little lame in my opinion.

At least Finnbar Kennie added some Pizazz to his designs.
Last edited by Princestamps on 15 Jul 2017 22:18, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Jaqaiar from Tuapa village wrote: There are a lot of legends on Niue.

My favourite story is about Laufoli, a big warrior who protects the Island from bad people.

There was no challenge on Niue so he decided to go to Tonga. ... So he climbed the mountain, killed the big beast and came back to Niue. When he came back he had no challenges so he built a big umu and jumped in it to kill himself.
Poor lad! Having no challenges left eh? He SHOULD have taken up philately: that would give him LOTS of challenges, hunting out elusive material, and making sense of it all!

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by DJM »

Image

Hi all,

This one is giving me headaches. I think it is SG#55, but according to my 'Instanta' Perf Gauge the Perforations seem to be 14 all around instead of the listed Perf 13. Could someone please let me know if I am looking at the correct listing ?

Thanks,

Darrin.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

DJM wrote: I think it is SG#55, but according to my 'Instanta' Perf Gauge the Perforations seem to be 14 all around instead of the listed Perf 13. Could someone please let me know if I am looking at the correct listing ?

Thanks,

Darrin.
Hi Darrin, that would be the second printing (done in Wellington). This is SG 62, perf 14, PLUS it should have the NZ & star watermark. The SG 55 has NO watermark.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by DJM »

Thanks Panterra, found it. Had a hard time seeing a watermark.

Thanks,

Darrin.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

That 1/2d stamp, a great design isn't it.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Princestamps wrote:That 1/2d stamp, a great design isn't it.
Yes, good design, but it is a lie to show Capt Cook landing, as he never went ashore on Niue!

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

warm wrote:Another interesting set is this one overprinted 'INVALID'
Image
Image
Image
Enjoy
As "invalid" means a person who suffers some disability, I wonder if these may be Niue's "Food stamps" for invalids?
US Dept of Agriculture wrote:Food Stamp Special Rules for the Elderly or Disabled

US Dept of Agriculture Food and Nutrition Service

Most food stamp rules apply to all households, but there are a few special rules for households that contain an elderly or disabled member.

Who is Elderly?

A person is elderly if he or she is 60 years of age or older.

Who is Disabled?

Generally, a person is considered to be disabled for food stamp purposes if he or she:

Receives Federal disability or blindness payments under the Social Security Act, including Supplemental Security Income (SSI) or Social Security disability or blindness payments; or
Receives State disability or blindness payments based on SSI rules; or
Receives a disability retirement benefit from a governmental agency because of a disability considered permanent under the Social Security Act; or
Receives an annuity under the Railroad Retirement Act and is eligible for Medicare or is considered to be disabled based on the SSI rules; or
Is a veteran who is totally disabled, permanently housebound, or in need of regular aid and attendance; or
Is a surviving spouse or child of a veteran who is receiving VA benefits and is considered to be permanently disabled.


How do I Get Food Stamps?

A member of your household has to apply at the local food stamp office. It should be listed in the government section of the local telephone book. This is generally the quickest way to find the local food stamp office. If that doesn't work, try calling the Food Stamp Hotline for your State. Most of them are toll free numbers.

If you are unable to go to the food stamp office, you may have another person, called an authorized representative, apply and be interviewed on your behalf. You must designate the authorized representative in writing.
I could not locate Niue's equivalent, but judging from those stamps, assume there MUST be something similar there. :?

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

A Niue collector wrote:
warm wrote:The most desirable Niue item is the double overprint on the Lake Wakatipu issue
Image
and
Image
Those that survive could probably be counted on the fingers of one butchers hand.

I would welcome news and provenance of other examples.

Nice!!!!!

I love to see some better stuff amongst my ordinary collection and Scuba's love affair for the Kenny productions. :lol: :lol: :lol:

You don't have a Tahae Sileni example do you?
I do have a double overprint [but it is in the bank] so will scan in due course.
these others have been sold in auctions
There were two examples in the Spink auction of June 2003

Lot 384 Sold £2300

Image


This looks like the original second scan.

and lot 385 Sold £1600

Image



So this gives 4 copies there must be more of them.

Here is a scan of my Tahae Shilling. But these are much more common.
Image
Image
Enjoy

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Princestamps wrote:Moving back to a slightly earlier and more fulfilling period, one can see these beauties. The first item is a 1967 Decimal currency FDC except it only has the 4 arms values and the two highest value overprints
Image

The Arms stamps, despite the heavy foxing are the more scarce rough perf versions of 1967. This cover is one of the more desirable later Niue items. The design of it too, is also suggestive of the similar design for New Zealand 1967 Decimal currency items.
I can shed some light on that attractive cover. It was produced by an Auckland stamp firm, the Aotearoa Stamp Co., run by an interesting philatelist from Waiheke Island named Fred Boric. He printed colourful FDCs for all the new NZ stamps, and supplied a big network of stationers and bookshops throughout NZ, plus many stamp dealers. This Niue FDC for decimal currency is similar to the one he did for NZ's decimal currency introduction, but it has the Niue map substituted. It would be interesting to learn how many were sold of the Niue version.

I later took over Fred's FDC production business, running it as Oceanic Philatelic Bureau, and all the FDCs I produced had "OPB" in small print in the design. At the same time, a Taranaki firm Philatelic Distributors was also publishing regular FDCs. Both businesses were forced to close once the NZ Post Office began serious FDC production in addition to their stamp-production.

The first FDC I did was for NZ's 1974 Commonwealth Games, and my last was the 1976 Anniversaries set of 4th Feb. I handed over the FDC production business to an Auckland philatelist Brian Farmer, but he was sadly killed in a train crash after doing just a few FDCs.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Image
Niue 1902 SG 2, in a used strip, with 17th November 1902 violet pmk.
This wonderful strip has the first postmark N.1, which is almost always used in violet. It seems curious that it says "Niue, New Zealand", which is a slight misnomer.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by warm »

[quote="Panterra]
Image
Niue 1902 SG 2, in a used strip, with 17th November 1902 violet pmk.
This wonderful strip has the first postmark N.1, which is almost always used in violet. It seems curious that it says "Niue, New Zealand", which is a slight misnomer.[/quote]

What a lovely strip. Excellent

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Chris55 »

I picked up this cover recently at a flea market for 10c. Lovely stamps from 1950. It's first day of issue but missing the 2 highest values.

Does anyone know what the airmail postal rate from Niue to England was at that time?

Cheers,
Chris

Image
"Consider the postage stamp, son. It secures success through its ability to stick to one thing till it gets there." Josh Billings [Henry Wheeler Shaw (April 21, 1818 – October 14, 1885)]

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

I think Niue to New Zealand was 2d an ounce and my guess is possibly more. The airport on Niue was not opened until 1970. So the cover went to New Zealand (Likely Auckland) by ship possibly the MV. Matua.

New Zealand to UK by airmail was at least 3/- an ounce in the early 50s, dropping to 1/9 by 1960 and 1/3 by 1965. Aerograms were on the other hand only 8d.

So my guess is this cover with the complete set barely covered the whole rate. Nice to have one sent to England though.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Chris55 »

Thanks for the fast reply Princestamps.
So, although it is obviously philatelic, it seems as though it went (with 3s 1½d) at the more or less correct rate - nice to know given that it's missing the 2 highest values in the set.

Cheers,
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

Our club is having another talk on August 21st, which will be like the first, but with more detail. Niue has issued more stamps since last year. I would have loved to shown you, but my computer again has no printer as the latest Chinese made piece of rubbish broke after 3 months.

The days of bringing back quality local workmanship seem a distant memory when slaves in 3rd world slave conditions in a communist nation who work for like $50 a year are making them. Who else is sick of low quality manufacturing?

So I will load a photo of them at some stage.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Chris55 »

Unusual that it broke after 3 months. They usually go shortly after the warranty expires!! What's worse is that it costs more to repair the damned things than it does to buy a new one. Oh well that's the world we live in at the moment - the built-in expendability and throw away economy. Maybe as resources get less and the prices go up we might change back to making things that last. But I wont hold my breath!

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

As promised, here are my latest acquisitions. The first is a better old stamp from the end of period 2 (1902 - 1920)

Image

A New Zealand long type fiscal stamp used between 1882 and 1931, this one is overprinted Niue was meant to be used for postage. They were overprinted between 1918 and 1929, values included this one 2/6, 5/- 10/- and £1 and possibly 3/- as well. This was also done for other island territories of New Zealand including Rarotonga, Cook Islands and Western Samoa.

Next are the 4 new issues that have appeared since my last image of newer stamps back in 2013.

Image

The top issue is the Niue Blue Butterfly (A lot like a similar issue for Tokelau), quite nice, but like all recent issues colourful but formulaic.

Second is Christmas 2013, which again uses Nativity themes, very popular with the very religious locals.

Third is traditional dress that came out in early 2014, this is a colourful and bright issue that at least shows a relevant local topic, something missing on period 6 and 7 issues. Still it looks a bit formulaic.

Finally is a tropical fish issue from June this year, its Niue's latest stamp offering, some 112 years after the first. The best of the 4 issues, but could have been better without the lettering and the photo could have occupied the whole frame rather than 2/3 of it. Still the $1.40 stands out well.

As you can see, NZ Post has made issuing very conservative here, usually 3 or 4 issues a year with 3 having a 30 cent stamp (Local rate). Still the constant issuing of a $4 value seems unecessary as the rate for airmail to New Zealand is only $1.40 and $2 for the rest of the world. Of the issues, one is Christmas and the others are special themes. Last two years we only got 1 each as the Royal Anniversaries took precedence.

Still compared to Samoa, Tonga and all the Cooks under Philatelic Collector, you have to admire this more conservative path Niue has taken with its issuing.
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

My bad, checking the earlier posts, the Butterfly set had already been released and was shown there.

Niue new issues can be bought off the NZ Post stamps website.
http://stamps.nzpost.co.nz/shop/international-stamps/niue

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by mauriziolaos »

Small contribution for 'period 7'
3 envelopes sent to Lao P.D.R. on (top to bottom) July 3, 2004 - July 2, 2004 - Nov 10, 2014).
Alofi cancels almost unreadable!
By the way are there any other post office, agency except Alofi ??

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mauriziolaos

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Panterra »

Another beautiful issue from the much-maligned Period 6:

The South Pacific Festival of the Arts:
Image


Niue issued these attractive stamps showing traditional sculptures from various Pacific islands, on 30th July 1980, to celebrate the South Pacific Festival of the Arts, at Port Moresby, Papua New Guinea. Here is the full set.

The sculptures shown are:

20c ... Ceremonial Stool, New Guinea.

20c ... Ku-Tagwe Plaque, New Guinea.

20c ... Suspension Hook, New Guinea.

20c ... Ancestral Board, New Guinea.

25c ... Platform post, New Hebrides.

25c ... Canoe ornament, New Ireland.

25c ... Carved figure, Admiralty Islands.

25c ... Female with child, Admiralty Islands.

30c ... The God A'a, Rurutu, Austral Islands.

30c ... Statue of the God of the Sea, Tangaroa, Cook Islands.

30c ... Ivory pendant, Tonga.

30c ... Tapa cloth, Niue.

35c ... Feather box, New Zealand.

35c ... Hei-Tiki amulet, New Zealand.

35c ... House post, New Zealand.

35c ... Feather image of the War God Ku, Hawai'i.

SG 336 - 351.
====

Hawaiian Life wrote:The four primal Hawaiian gods wore several faces, but none more disparate than Ku, who was the god of prosperity, as well as the much-feared and terrible god of war and sorcery. He was also god of the deep forest, of the mountain, of dry and wet farming and the god of fishing. He also ruled the red flowering ohia lehua tree and his images were carved from that wood.

Many carved images of Ku portray him with huge bulging eyes and a protruding tongue. He was also the god Kukailimoku, meaning “snatcher of the islands”, that Kamehameha prayed to as he set out to unite the islands. The legend has it that Kamehameha was commanded by the god to build a luakini heiau on the Big Island for him to guarantee him success in war. Kamehameha invited his cousin and chief rival and when the latter ended on the shore, he and his warriors were attacked and killed, and Kamehameha’s cousin became the first sacrifice to the terrifying god.

After the kapu system was abolished, the keeper of Kaili (abbreviation for Kukailimoku) set the akua adrift in a canoe with food, tapa cloth, and awa, the alcoholic drink made from taro, so that it would make its way make to Kahiki, where the gods came from.

It was said that akua or image of the god was a roughly carved, small wooden figure with a headdress made of yellow feathers. When the god was consulted, the feathers would stand erect or fly to the person favored to win in war. If the god remained passive, the omen was unfavorable and the battle would be either postponed or altogether abandoned if the negative omen was subsequently repeated. It was said that Kaili had a voice which would be heard above the din of battle.
In addition to the set of 16 shown above, Finbar also issued them as four small minisheets, each stamp having a 2 cents surcharge "to raise funds for the Festival".
Image
Niue 1980 Arts Festival set, in minisheets, with each stamp now having a 2c surcharge.
These are SG MS352.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

Time to revive this thread by showing some of the classic Niue issues I have gained since last year. These were bought and completed mostly in the past year by me.

I won't bore you with too many details about each as this thread has plenty of information already about Niuean history and culture.

I do not have an SG one, as they are very rare, but I will start with SG2 - 7

Image

For all pre 1950 Niue stamps, they were either overprints on New Zealand issues or stamps using Cook Island colonial cliches with Niue on them. New Zealand was in charge of the Niuean Post Office up to 1974 and the Cook Islands to 1965, so all of these classics are NZ inspied for Niuean usage.

Also not every stamp in a NZ set was utilised for colonial use, only for values needed. Until 1916 Native language was used on the overprints on most values, except for the ½d which had a very long series of words in Niuean.

Here you see the ½d, and 2½d were used first in 1902, these are on 1899 and 1900 printings of the 1898 Pictorials, although the ½d green was introduced in 1900, formerly being brown and the 1d Universal is 1901. Numerous varieties and errors exist of all these stamps given the amateruish quality of overprinting (done in NZ not Niue).

We have already seen the thief shilling (Tahae sileni) and doubled up overprint on the 2½d which is a true rarity. Here are their more normal cousins! The 3d, 6d and 1/- were added to the set in 1903 and copies of all values were printed up to 1905.

The set was used until 1911, with usage of the 1d, 3d and 2½d carrying on until 1915/17. Used copies of all values above 1d are more scarce than mint and there was little need for mail at this time. Most locals were illiterate until the 1950s and only missionaries, traders and officials needed stamps. By the 1920s, there were radio operators and people sending movie reels as well, which led to need for higher value stamps.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

Image

3 overprinted values of the 1909 KEVII set joined the line up in 1911, again utilising the exact same overprints as 1902/03. The subsequent values of the old sets were exhausted. Mint copies of the stamps are fairly common, but used are scarce.

Image

The 2½d was replaced in 1915 with a similar stamp and the same overprint, but the stamp used was a finer printing from 1907 and had a smaller perforation. This stamp is quite scarce. The Penny Universal joined the line up in early 1917 and used the same overprint but in black. The 3d was of the new KGV series and this is very scarce being used only for a few months and worth £50 mint and double that used, my copy was not cheap.

All of these stamps were a temporary measure and the 6 stamps replaced the 6 1902/03 stamps. Later in 1917, a new set of 9 stamps was to be phased in.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

Post by Princestamps »

By 1917, they stopped using local language overprints and moved towards making Niueans more English speaking and adjusted to 20th century life. Stamps from 1917 onwards merely had Niue placed on them.

First was a series of Overprints on the KGV set of New Zealand 1915 and the Penny Universal of 1909.

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The war tax ensured that a 1½d stamp was needed and this was added to the set of 6 values. The 4 top values used recess printed KGV stamps like the Cooks and Samoa which became a NZ colony in 1914. The surface printed stamps included the ½d and 1d along with 2 types of the 1½d and anadditional 3d. These stamps with the exception of the 1d and 6d, 1/- are all very common. Yet they were used only for a short time (With the exception of the 2½d overseas letter rate until 1927, but this rate was at 3d between 1917 and 1924).

In 1918 with the arrival of radio and a settlement at Alofi, larger value stamps were needed to transport, films for a cinema, radio tape, medical equipment and even a car or two, larger value stamps were needed. As with the Cook Islands and Samoa, long type Fiscal stamps of Queen Victoria (1882 but reprinted and used up to 1930) were overprinted NIUE as they were for Samoa and the Cook Islands.

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There were hundreds of values in NZ and about 10 were done for Samoa, the stamps were allowed for postal use, but only to £1, but many were used up to £50 in the case of Samoa. Niue only had 5 values overprinted, what you see here and the £1, which is very scarce and I don't have. The 10/- was a hard to find stamp. These saw limited use beyond the 5/- and there was only 3 printings of the 5/-, 2 each of the other values. A few CTO's exist, but postally used copies of the 10/- and £1 are truly rare.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

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Moving into the 1920s we get our first proper pictorial set. Not NZ overprints but a set of 6 stamps showing Cook Island scenes. Issued as part of the Cook Islands colony administered by NZ, but essentially part of the British Empire.

The set of 6 was well designed, showing scenes adapted from Photographs and elaborate frames with a 2 colour printing. The set was issued for Rarotonga, Penrhyn, Atiutaki (All Cook Islands groups) and Niue. The 2 low values had same colour frames, but all the higher values had different coloured frames for each island group.

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The set of 6 was released in August 1920 and the1d and ½d (Not shown) were reissued on watermarked paper in 1925. The crudely drawn single colour 2½d and 4d were added to the set in 1927.

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As the pictorial set only went up to 1/-, long types were used for higher values and even in NZ, no pictorial stamp had a Face Value over 1/- until 1935 and then 3/- until 1954. The 2/- Admiral was issued in 1926 in New Zealand and Niuean overprints appeared in 1927 and 1928 (Lighter paper).

The local rate increased to 2d in late 1930 and the overprint was added to the set in early 1931, of course after an outcry in NZ, the rate was dropped back to 1d in early 1932.

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1931 also saw the long types replaced by the Arms set. The 4 values for Niue were 2/6 (Common), 5/- (Less common), 10/- (Very scarce) and £1 (rare). Used even more so. Of the first 1931 printing I only have a 2/6.
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

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1932 would see the issue of one of the most enduring pictorial sets. Its not that different to the 1920/27 set. Again a series of Cook Island cliches was used, but unlike the earlier set, all stamps kept the same colour frames and higher values were recess printed. The only other set was Cook Islands (Atiutaki, Penrhyn and Rarotonga had all been merged)

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The first version was the 7 values ½d to 1/- and the first series was on unwatermarked paper and I only have 2 of the 7 stamps. The second series issued between 1932 and 1936 featured a single NZ watermark.

The set has a charming art deco design and inverted watermarks and printing varieties exist. None of these stamps are rare and it is quite easy to get.

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The Silver Jubilee of KGV was the first commemorative set and merely was 3 stamps overprinted (The 1d, 2½d and 6d). My 6d has a thin N variety on the KING part. Most of the overprints were badly done and the plates broke easily and overprints are found all over a stamps surface.

The second set is an overprint on the NZ Coronation set of 1937, all 3 values were overprinted Niue. This also happened in the Cook Islands but not in Samoa for some reason (Tokelau was not NZ yet).

Finally in 1938, further changes to the 1932 set were issued.

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The 1/- KGV was withdrawn and replaced by the 1/- KGVI shown. Also as 2/- and 3/- were now pictorials in New Zealand, these stamps were added to the Niuean series. Again both show Cook Island scenes and similar stamps without Niue in the title were issued. These two high values have quite high catalogue values as well and are quite hard to get.

Tropical gum was used by this stage and yet many stamps are still toned, for some reason New Zealand did not take much care with colonial issues at this time. Again single watermarked paper was used. In 1944 they were reissued in multiple watermark paper.

Alofi was the only postal agency on the island too and by this stage First Day Covers were becoming common.
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

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In the 1940s, a slighter thinner NIUE overprint was used and also Multiple watermark paper. This arms set is quite scarce and was issued and used between 1941 and 1954 with stamps released in 2 or 3 types all at different times.

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Here is a complete set mint and the 2 lower values used as well. Used 10/- and £1 are very rare, the lower values less so. This is amongst one of my finest Niuean items.

Like Glen said, the stamps are cheap to get compared to some places. Niue is so small, that even "Common stamps" like the 1d of most issues, they only issued 250k or 500k at most and the £1 stamp here, they issued less than 5,000 of them. The 10/- had 12,000 stamps of all 3 printings (1931, 1941, 1949) and yet both stamps catalogue at £70 for their cheapest printings and about £200 for the most expensive!

I bought this set on Sunday, mainly as it is the first one I have ever seen for sale and this is in New Zealand, a place where its probably the easiest to find Pacific Island stamps.
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

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The 1944 - 46 set was a reissue of the 1932 set and the 1938 additional values in multiple watermark paper. Of the 3 types of this set, this is the easiest to find and only the 2/- and 3/- will cost you more than £10 each.

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Included are two printings of the ½d which show lighter and darker centres. A stranger in the set is the 3d. This stamp dates from 1940 and was originally going to be 1½d, written as Threehalfpence, but the War intervened and all 400k of this stamp were overprinted by blocking out the "Half" and putting 3d either side of the stamp to avoid confusion. Unlike with the Samoan and Cook Island versions, no examples exist without the overprint.

This set was used until 1950, when a new set of Niuean pictorials was issued.

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2 more commemorative sets followed in 1946 and 1953. First four values of the Peace set were overprinted and released in Niue on June 4th 1946, some 9 weeks after their NZ release. Niuean soldiers fought in World War Two, so the stamps had significance (An issue about to come out, will salute Niuean soldiers in both wars). The same four stamps were also printed for Samoa, and the Cook Islands.

In 1953, two values of the Coronation set of QE2 were also printed and Niue was added to the part where "New Zealand" was supposed to be. The 6d was formerly 8d in New Zealand. The same two stamps were issued in Samoa and the Cook Islands, whereas Tokelau only got the 3d.
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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

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Finally in 1950 Niue got its own set of 10 Pictorial stamps designed by James Berry and showing uniquely Niuean scenes rather than Cook Island ones.

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This set saw a long usage of 17 years and they were the only stamps issued in Niue between 1950 and 1967 except for the 1953 Coronation pair. The set is easy to find and is printed in recess printing.

In 1967 It was overprinted for decimal currency and used an additional 2 years until a set of flowers and the Queen on the 20cents was issued in 1969.

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Also in 1967, a set of arms were issued for the four high values. They are overprints, but you will notice the value tablets on the arms are blank. The top set are fine perforations and very common, set below are the scarcely seen rough perforations, used for emergency stock around 1970. Top set catalogues at £2.50, bottom set for 10 times more!

Now I will skip 1967 to 2014.

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Re: NIUE - "the Rock" of Polynesia.

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In October 2014, a new set of definitives were issued in loose and sheetlet form. They are shown below.

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20c - Talava Arches (Naturally formed arches)
30c - Mutalau (Jungle sink holes)
$1.00 - Avaiki Caves (Blue water diving grotto)
$1.20 - Lakepa Village Church
$1.40 - Golf Course
$1.70 - Huvalu Forest (Native Tropical forest)
$2.00 - Tepa point
$4.00 - Logo Chasm

The long format gives it a more scenic and natural format.

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Earlier posts showed 2011 to 2014 posts, here is the past years stamps.

Rows 1/3 - Definitives as above
Row 4 - Christmas 2014 - Decorations
Row 5 - Flora of Niue (Feb 2015)
Row 6 - Hiapo (Traditional Niuean Bark painting and cloth making - May 2015)
Row 7 - Niuean weapons (August 2015)

Beautiful stamps if somewhat high face values, still its not wallpaper like Philatelic collector rubbish.

Well that updates Niue for a while.

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