Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered in NZ

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adam78
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Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered in NZ

Post by adam78 »

The December issue of "The New Zealand Stamp Collector" to hand, and it includes an exciting story of the recent discovery in New Zealand of the stamp illustrated below

Image
(Actual size 2.2 x 2.4cm)

The 6k white embossed 1857 Tiflis 6K is only the 6th copy recorded of what is recognised as Russia's first postage stamp.

Dr Robin Gwynn RDP FRPSL FRPSNZ recounts the long story of his purchase of the 1876 Oppens album for NZ$3,300 in an Auckland public auction in August 2014, and the long trail towards identification and certification of this stamp.

Eventually it was sold through Spinks in London in October 2017 with a reserve of
£70-100,000, and was hammered at £165,000 (in excess of NZ$300,000).

The story was also recounted in 'The London Philatelist' late in 2017.

A lengthy history of the stamps can be found here https://www.tiflisstamp.com

This makes it the most significant classic philatelic finds from New Zealand and it is encouraging that even after 100 years, globally significant items can still be uncovered.

Robin has also been extremely generous with his windfall, donating significant sums to both the RPSNZ and the RPSL towards new premises sought by both societies.

Meantime, I'll ask the Editor if I can copy the whole article online for all to read the fascinating story.

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Maxime Citerne »

adam78 wrote: Eventually it was sold through Spinks in London in October 2017 with a reserve of
£70-100,000, and was hammered at £165,000 (in excess of NZ$300,000).
That Tiflis stamp was part of two major Russian material sales held by Spink within a short period. Besides the iconic Tiflis, there were other amazing items, including a superb range of rare imperial essays and fabulous covers.

It is amazing to notice that none of those sales have been subject to targetted marketing to the international societies specialized in Russian philately, such as Rossica and the BSRP. Most of their members would have been unaware of those two Spink sales :!:

Selling a Tiflis stamp is a MAJOR event in the Russian philately world, and certainly deserved much better publicity.

Personnally, I discovered those sales by chance at the last moment, while browsing the Philasearch website. I spend a few hours studying the material offered - in a hurry -, and dropped a hefty five figures amount via internet bidding ... just to discover that the closing date of Spink and Philasearch did NOT match.

Therefore all my bids were submitted too late, exactly when the auction closed (i.e they were not taken into account). What a mess. Losses both to the buyer and owners/sellers.

I will not go on the subject of the Spink website, which is user unfriendly.

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Maxime Citerne »

adam78 wrote:
Meantime, I'll ask the Editor if I can copy the whole article online for all to read the fascinating story.
Thank you Adam.

I would be very pleased to read that article here. :D

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Global Administrator »

Maxime Citerne wrote:
Selling a Tiflis stamp is a MAJOR event in the Russian philately world, and certainly deserved much better publicity.

Personnally, I discovered those sales by chance at the last moment, while browsing the Philasearch website. I spend a few hours studying the material offered - in a hurry -, and dropped a hefty five figures amount via internet bidding ... just to discover that the closing date of Spink and Philasearch did NOT match.

Therefore all my bids were submitted too late, exactly when the auction closed (i.e they were not taken into account). What a mess. Losses both to the buyer and owners/sellers.

I will not go on the subject of the Spink website, which is user unfriendly.

Maxime
My often voiced view is that Spink are totally incompetent with marketing, and as you say they would get FAR better results if one of the Public Servant types in there spent an hour doing some work on that, rather than delicately eating cucumber sandwiches and sipping Darjeeling Tea. :)

Arthur's Gray's Australia Stamp Booklets collection (the finest ever formed) Spink is offering March 8, also along with a huge Kangaroo collection. Only a month away. :roll: :roll:

Spink as usual tell no-one here in the general collector community about this sale. No press releases, no ads in 'Stamp News' - no nothing. Cruddy images etc.

The Gray family will get a FRACTION of what a good auction like Phoenix would have obtained for them I am sure. The oz booklet market is HERE - not in the UK. :roll: :roll: :roll:

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Maxime Citerne »

I knew Glen would join in here :wink: :lol:

To be sure, I just checked my last issues of both the British Journal of Russian Philately (edited by the BSRP) and the last Rossica Journal: there are lots of advertisement from D. Feldman, Heinrich Koehler, C. Gärtner, Cherrystone Auctions, Raritan Stamps, Philatelists.ru etc.

Most of the major players in the Russian field are there.

Unless I am mistaken, nothing from Spink. My apologies in advance if I missed something.

Maxime

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by aethelwulf »

Maxime Citerne wrote:It is amazing to notice that none of those sales have been subject to targetted marketing to the international societies specialized in Russian philately, such as Rossica and the BSRP. Most of their members would have been unaware of those two Spink sales :!:
Certainly sounds like the Gray sale Spink conducted, marketing-wise.

Discussion of that was somewhere recently--included in the thread about the sale of Australian material in Switzerland?
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Maxime Citerne »

aethelwulf,

Were you aware of the last Sinkiang Postal History sale by Spink that occured a few weeks ago?

Some great material, including one of the two recorded URUMTSI Russian PO cover.

That item alone fetched 55,000 Pounds - but my educated guess is that it could have fetch MORE if that would have been marketed like the Raymond Casey/David Feldman sales have been. The potential of that cover was in the 6 digits regarding the current Asian market, in my opinion.

And again, no targetted marketing. :!:

Now it is really difficult to find the scans of that sale buried somewhere (but where?) in the Spink website. Being aware of that, I fortunately could download all pictures for my references before the end of the auction.

Maxime

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by adam78 »

Permission has been obtained form the author to place the article online, so you can read it here.

http://www.rpsnz.org.nz/images/stories/royal/News/Tiflis.pdf

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by nigelc »

adam78 wrote:Permission has been obtained form the author to place the article online, so you can read it here.

http://www.rpsnz.org.nz/images/stories/royal/News/Tiflis.pdf

Adam.
Hi Adam,

Thank you very much for sharing this article. It's a fascinating read. :D

I've read the London Philatelist article and it's clear just how painstaking the technical analysis of this stamp has been.
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Maxime Citerne »

Thank you very much, a great read indeed.

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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Global Administrator »

adam78 wrote:Permission has been obtained form the author to place the article online, so you can read it here.

https://www.rpsnz.org.nz/images/stories/royal/News/Tiflis.pdf

Adam.
Well done Adam. :mrgreen:

Wonderful gesture or Robin Gynne to offer to donate $100,000 to the NZ Society's new home. :idea:

Sadly google does not index PDF's so have added it here as well, which will expose it to 10,000s of extra readers. :mrgreen:
= = = =
Image

The New Zealand Stamp Collector

77 Volume 97 No. 4 December 2017

Major World Rarity Discovered in New Zealand by Robin Gwynn, RDP FRPSL FRPSNZ


A startling story that started in New Zealand, which has spanned continents and contributed to world philatelic knowledge, has unfolded across the past three years. With no original intent on my part, it is a tale which involved me personally as I stumbled into rarified areas of world philately which never in a month of Sundays could I have expected to penetrate.

I cannot tell the story dispassionately, can only relate it as it unfolded before my eyes, so hope readers will pardon the personal slant of this article.

The Sideface Connection It all started in the friendly, well-trodden, ever fascinating territory of New Zealand’s 1893 advertisement stamps. Rather over three years ago, on 16 August 2014, Auckland City Stamps conducted its seventh public auction.

The sale featured an astonishing 43 lots of adsons from a collection which had not seen the light of day since the Whakatane Exhibition of 1967. That was two years before I arrived in New Zealand, and I had never seen or heard of such a holding.

It included a complete reconstruction of the advertisement in blue, and I had always thought that my own, formerly in Dr Ken McNaught’s collection, was the only such reconstruction that existed. The collector had even attempted to make a start towards a reconstruction of the scarce 1d special printing with reversed watermark, although (unsurprisingly) he had not been able to make too much progress with that.

He had tried to plate the advertisements on every value of the adsons from 1d to 1/-, with a remarkable degree of success. It was a collection which I simply had to see, so I was lured into driving to Auckland to inspect it.

Image
Oppen’s Postage Stamp Album, 1876 Edition (actual size 17 x 21 cm)


An Unusual Album After viewing the advertisement lots, I had an hour of viewing time to spare the previous evening, and turned idly to look at some of the mixed lots. One which caught my attention, lot 154, had the description: Old World Printed Album incl German States, GB 1840 1d Black & 2d Blue plus other QV, Early Italian, Ceylon, India, Hong Kong, Cape of Good Hope incl a few triangles, USA with Revenues, NSW, NZ incl FFQ’s incl imperf 1/- SG 17 & Perfs etc. Mostly QV to GV Period. Some of the stamps are stuck down in the album. Needs lot of work but has great potential. Very high cat. Needs inspection. (100s).

What struck me on viewing it was that this was the earliest album I had ever seen in New Zealand, being an Oppen’s Postage Stamp Album of 1876, and it was in perfect condition with no signs of rust and its pages remarkably fresh. (It is an astonishing comment on the instant appeal of stamp collecting to the Victorians that this was already the 20th edition of the album.)

It was therefore because it was a pristine and exceptionally early book that I decided to bid on this lot rather than because of the stamps in it, although the presence of a USA 1869 bi-coloured 90c suggested the estimate of $NZ1,800 might well be on the low side. The next day it was knocked down to me for $NZ3,300.

Since I had bought such an unusual and pristine book, you can imagine my fury and incredulity when I opened it on returning home and found that part of one page had been cut out since I had viewed it. What had caused such vandalism? Enquiries showed another potential bidder had asked whether the stuck-down stamps could be soaked off, and the auctioneer had experimented.

That was a decision which ruined my entire purpose in buying the lot, and I was on the point of returning it when I thought I would first spend the evening inspecting what I had in my hands in more detail. Italian States have never been a strong point in my philatelic knowledge, and inspection revealed there were some rare stamps in that area which, as far as I could tell, seemed to be genuine and which certainly had much to teach me.

So with some misgivings, I held on to the album. As far as I was concerned it was now useless as a book, so over the forthcoming months I disbound it and soaked the stamps off page after page. In the process I found frequent surprises varying from good stamps in surprisingly fine condition to a Nova Scotia imperforate which had looked good but came off its page in four pieces.

From New Zealand to London After six enjoyable months it had become clear that the lot had been cheap, I had learnt a good deal about material not often seen in New Zealand, and I was left with perhaps a dozen or fifteen items I simply could not identify. Gradually I found out what these were - revenues, mostly - until I was left with just two, both apparently from the Russian area.

Neither looked all that promising, and I suspected they were postal stationery cutouts. Discussion with one of our leading experts on Russia did not help. But given what I had found in the album I remained curious, and since historical research was taking me to London, I took the two items with me. Shortly afterwards I visited the London Stampex of September 2015, where by chance the Spink stand was immediately in front of the entrance.

Out came my stock-card, and a tremor of restrained excitement passed over the face of Dominic Savastano, dealing with my enquiry. Amid some mutterings behind the counter I thought I heard the word ‘Tiflis’, but for a long time it meant nothing to me.

It was only gradually, with the repeated and very kind assistance of Norman Banfield FRPSL FRPSNZ, that the full extent of my ignorance was to be revealed. Tiflis is the former name of Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia. It was there that the first Russian stamp was officially issued in mid 1857.

Essentially the stamp was a local, designed to carry mail between Tiflis itself and the summer residence of the Tsar’s representative at Kodzhory. But it is far more than a mere local issue. Postal stationery had been issued previously in Russia, where various city posts existed, but not adhesive postage stamps.

And the archival record confirms their authorization by the new post manager for the Caucasus district, the appointee of Prince Baryatinsky who was the Tsar’s direct deputy for the region. So the Tiflis is Russia’s first stamp, and its official status is proven and certain.

England to America It is also extremely rare. Before my example turned up, if it had been correctly identified, there were just five known copies. Three of them had been in the Fabergé collection which was dispersed on the eve of the World War II, one was in the Berlin Museum, and the fifth was in the Smithsonian in America. My example was none of these, and clearly, with that degree of rarity, expertisation was essential.

English experts consulted suggested that New York might be a good place to expertise it, so that is where the stamp was sent. The reply came back with admirable speed but a disappointing result: ‘Tiflis Embossed - FAKE. In my opinion, this stamp is a forgery’. The end of the story? The stamp returned to New Zealand with me at the end of my time in Britain in late 2015.

Researches in New Zealand. An unexpected development came when I received an offer of £5,000 for the stamp, sight unseen, from someone who had heard the story and knew of the opinion. An unusual situation, to say the least! It was an offer not without attraction: I was in possession of an apparent forgery, for which I was being offered two or three times the price I had paid for the entire collection of which it had been part.

It certainly forced me to do all the research I could to try to understand the whole background of the Tiflis issue, which became possible as Norman Banfield continued to supply me with a series of articles he managed to locate in the philatelic press: fortunately they were mostly in English, having been published in America in the specialist magazine Rossica. Had the certificate stated that my item was a proof or a postal stationery cutout, I would have had no reason to query it.

But notwithstanding my complete ignorance of early Russian philately, the more I read, the more I could not see how it was actually possible for my stamp to be a forgery, for two reasons. One concerned the history of the issue, the other the album from which the stamp came. The articles revealed a fascinating story about Victorian uncertainty regarding the Tiflis.

Awareness that there was such a forerunner of the later stamps of Russia only surfaced over twenty years after its use. The well-known philatelist J. B. Moens then listed the stamp in his published catalogue, but despite enquiries in Tiflis he could find no details about the issue.

The first example of the Tiflis stamp (now in the Berlin Museum) was not identified until 1913, shortly before the outbreak of the First World War. During the following decade, positive archival evidence of its authorisation was located.

As for the album before me, it was printed in 1876, and the stuck down collection in it appeared to include nothing later than the very early 1880s. (Some other stamps had been added around 1930, but they were hinged not stuck in, and had been kept distinct from the original collection.)

If the stamp was only identified quarter of a century after the collection had been put together, how could it possibly have been forged in about 1880? Yet there was no sign of interference with the original collection. And it could not have been a modern forgery, because the stamp had been on its page long enough to leave a shadow impression of the embossing visibly etched into the page after the stamp had been soaked off, and that could not happen without long contact.

Other matters were also troubling. I could not find a single forgery or reprint of any kind in the collection; there were no Samoa, for instance, and the sole Heligoland stamp was common and its colour proclaimed it to be genuine. And if my stamp was a more recent forgery intended to make money, why put it in a collection with no marking of any kind to suggest the stamp was of possible interest, and then sell the collection in a country in which not one single collector could identify what it was?

None of this made sense, and in the end I decided matters could not be left as they were. My stamp needed direct comparison with one of the known accepted examples, and none of those were in Australasia or readily accessible. I went before a Justice of the Peace to swear and sign a legal declaration under oath of how it had come into my possession, and took the item back with me to the United Kingdom when I returned there to renew my historical studies in July 2016.

Steps retraced: England and America revisited If a second opinion was to be sought, the only possible expertising body in the United Kingdom which might progress an item of this magnitude was that of the Royal Philatelic Society of London.

It was my great good fortune that its chairman, Christopher Harman, was prepared to hear me out and became interested in the story; perhaps he was influenced by having received for his committee’s opinion during the previous couple of years several European classics he might not have expected from New Zealand, drawn from the same collection.

I left with him the Tiflis stamp, the page from which it had come, the previous negative opinion, and such evidence as I had been able to muster, and waited to see whether or not the Committee would confirm the earlier finding. First, it subjected the Tiflis to very close examination and comparison under high magnification with photographic records of the known examples.

The design details proved satisfactory, but given the circumstances it was essential that physical comparison be made. Eventually Mr Harman took the stamp to New York, where the staff of the Smithsonian National Postal Museum kindly agreed to remove their example from its page so that the two specimens could be examined together. The results were startling and conclusive.

The process of the examination has been detailed in Christopher G. Harman RDP Hon. FRPSL, ‘Tiflis City Post circa June 1857 New Discovery: Sixth Example of the First Adhesive Stamp of Russia’, The London Philatelist, September 2017, pp. 310-315. One particularly interesting observation under high magnification showed the same previously unrecorded small design flaw present on both stamps.

Examination of the constituents of the handmade paper provided a very close match. The final conclusion: ‘The Expert Committee is satisfied that the newly discovered example of the Tiflis city post 6 kop matches the known genuine examples in both design and paper, and is genuine in every respect’. An unqualified certificate was therefore issued.

The most significant find ever made in New Zealand There are a small handful of New Zealand stamps of which only a single example is known, such as the Second Sideface halfpenny and twopence with single line sideways watermark, the 4d inverted centre of 1902-07, or the 1943 health stamp imperf between varieties.

These are usually variants of stamps often seen in a much commoner form, and in terms of world significance they cannot compare with the first issue of a large stamp-issuing country of which there are (now) only six known examples.

The Tiflis is by far the rarest classic issue ever discovered in New Zealand; the nearest challenger would be the Indian Queen Victoria four annas stamp of 1854-55 with inverted head found in 1934 by Miss Mary Lynch of Levin, which is number XXIII in the Williams listing devoted to rare stamps of the world.

The Tiflis is so rare that it was over half a century before the first example was found in 1913. The other four previously known copies were all found between then and 1939, so no new example had surfaced in the past seventy-five years. For such a thing to turn up in 2014 in New Zealand, of all places, borders on the bizarre.

This must surely be the first occasion on which this country has been able to add significantly to the records of classical philately, but the new find does that because the collection from which it came can reliably be dated to c.1880. That makes it the only example that can definitely be placed around the time when Moens was making his enquiries.

In a sense, therefore, not only does the comparison of the New Zealand stamp with that in the Smithsonian prove the genuineness of the former, it also confirms the genuineness of the latter. The new find is not only historically important and rare, it is the most expensive stamp ever discovered in this country. It was offered in London by Spink as lot 1677 in their Philatelic Collector’s Series sale of 25-26 October 2017.

Image


The lot was described as: Russia 1857 Tiflis Local 6k. embossed in colourless relief on thick white paper, unused without gum, margins all round, generally fine and sharp embossing; a few very minor surface marks. A superb and wonderful recently discovered World Rarity which had remained unrecognised in an old Oppens album in New Zealand for the last 100 years or so. The first stamp of Russia and one of only six recorded genuine examples, two of which are in institutional collections. With R.P.S. Certificate (2016). Photo.

The lot was estimated at £70,000-£100,000. Spirited bidding in the room and on internet saw it knocked down with a hammer price of £165,000. (Spink Buyer Fee and VAT on Buyer Fees etc add to about 24% total = £205,000.)

Can the discovery of the Tiflis affect the future of our Society? It will be plain from this account that the discovery of the New Zealand Tiflis was sheer accident and luck, my own contribution no more than a little deduction and a certain bloody-mindedness.

On the other hand, there were critical contributions from philatelic friendships in New Zealand and abroad: from the Royal Philatelic Society of London, whose Expert Committee went far beyond the call of duty during its outstanding analysis of the stamp; from Norman Banfield, without whose assistance I could have done no research in New Zealand; from the auctioneer, without whose over-hasty use of scissors the album would be intact on my shelves as a book, the Tiflis still disregarded and unidentified; and from Dominic Savastano at Spink, who first identified what it was with no reference works to consult.

Under the circumstances, it is appropriate that the majority of the proceeds from this discovery should be used for the benefit of organized philately. I have a close relationship with the two Royal Societies of London and New Zealand, being a Fellow of both, one of the two London representatives in this country (with Barry Scott), and a past President of our own Society - it was while holding that position that I really came to know Norman Banfield. By strange coincidence, both societies are currently in need of a new home. So that is what I have targeted.

A message to all members and to other Wellington philatelists. Our current President has been informed that $100,000 will be made available towards this purpose (and no other) provided owning our own building has the clear and enthusiastic support of our membership. As I write this before the AGM, I am rather concerned to note that at this point of time we have no Secretary, and only two Council members apart from the officials. I think Lindsay Chitty and his team need more support.

Would all members please consider the matter and let their views be known to our President. In a wider sense I also appeal to other societies, collectors, dealers and auctioneers in the Wellington area to review current trends in philately, look thirty years into the future, and give serious consideration to whether the time may not be ripe for the foundation of something wider, a Wellington Philatelic Centre of which the Royal forms only a part.

An occasion like the discovery of the Tiflis is unlikely ever to come again. If it helps kick-start new philatelic developments in our nation’s Capital, the extraordinary story of this particular Russian stamp will echo long into the future.
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Lakatoi 4 »

A superbly written account of a great philatelic discovery.

Most people would have given up when the first certificate came back incorrectly stating that it was a forgery.

Had the true nature of this discovery not been pursued, the outcome would have been a sad loss to philately.

Well done :!:
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by dukeprince »

A wonderful and inspiring tale explained expertly , great perseverance was rewarded .

Believe in what you find and see always, to do otherwise results in loss to self and the hobby.

The idiot that removed the page deserves his loss, though it did drive you to the investigation and the wonderful result and reward that eventuated .

Well done, and I am envious of your tenacity and good fortune.

This great hobby again reinvigorated by such finds.
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by chaseynz »

I was an under-bidder for the album at the public auction in 2014, although truth be told I dropped out once the bids had gone much past the reserve price. There was some quite spirited bidding between Dr Gwynn and another gentleman.

I remember the album well, and there were some fabulous stamps there. Strange to think, though, that I would have glanced over a $300,000 stamp without realising what it was.

Over the past few years I have often wondered what became of that album and the stamps therein, so I was very pleased to have read this thread and the article. I'm also pleased that the album did go to such an astute collector - if I had been successful, I know that I probably would have assumed the Tiflis stamp to be a postal stationery cut-out.

It would be fascinating to know the story behind the original owner of the owner and how the album came to be for sale at the auction in 2014.
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Global Administrator »

chaseynz wrote:Strange to think, though, that I would have glanced over a $300,000 stamp without realising what it was.

I know that I probably would have assumed the Tiflis stamp to be a postal stationery cut-out.
MOST of us would have done the same I am sure. Me included most likely. :mrgreen:
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by adam78 »

Global Administrator wrote:Sadly google does not index PDF's so have added it here as well, which will expose it to 10,000s of extra readers. :mrgreen:
Nervous as I am to contradict Glen, Google does index linked PDFs.

They appear in searches prefixed with [PDF] as below - I searched for some content in some PDF's I've uploaded.
Image

All is covered in their link here.

https://webmasters.googleblog.com/2011/09/pdfs-in-google-search-results.html

On the original Tiflis topic, it is good to see several local NZ newspapers have picked up on the story.

NZ Herald
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11991082

Stuff
https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/101263704/the-kiwi-the-rare ... o-fool-him
(Although where they made the link that it was the NY Expert who tried to fool him beats me. :? )
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dukeprince
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by dukeprince »

adam78 wrote:
Global Administrator wrote:Sadly google does not index PDF's so have added it here as well, which will expose it to 10,000s of extra readers. :mrgreen:
Nervous as I am to contradict Glen, Google does index linked PDFs.

They appear in searches prefixed with [PDF] as below - I searched for some content in some PDF's I've uploaded.
Image

All is covered in their link here.

https://webmasters.googleblog.com/2011/09/pdfs-in-google-search-results.html

On the original Tiflis topic, it is good to see several local NZ newspapers have picked up on the story.

NZ Herald
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11991082

Stuff
https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/101263704/the-kiwi-the-rare ... o-fool-him
(Although where they made the link that it was the NY Expert who tried to fool him beats me. :? )
Adam your Herald and Stuff links add some new wonderful information and pictures of the album as well in the video , well done.

It would be nice to know who made the $5k offer , perhaps the Spink Guy who muttered Tiflis could be somewhere in the picture maybe?
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by Global Administrator »

adam78 wrote:
Nervous as I am to contradict Glen, Google does index linked PDFs.
NOT always. Often I know PDFs exist of a stamp topic that google does not index.
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jkrabbenbos
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Re: Russia 1857 6K Tiflis $300,000 World Rarity discovered i

Post by jkrabbenbos »

Global Administrator wrote:
adam78 wrote:
Nervous as I am to contradict Glen, Google does index linked PDFs.
NOT always. Often I know PDFs exist of a stamp topic that google does not index.
Glen's statement is indeed correct.

Webmasters have a possibility to tell search robots what to search and what not to search. Which can result in PDF files not being indexed. For the technical side of this search for 'robots.txt' on Google or any other search engine.

Back on topic: great story which keeps us collectors looking around for that single big find in our life. And I love the gesture to reinvest the money into stamps collecting, even if it is on the other side of the world for me (although I'm a RPSNZ member 8) ).
Kind regards,
Jan
Collecting: Netherlands, pre-decimal New Zealand, Canada
Special interest areas: Canada Admirals, NZ Adsons, Antarctica, E.H. Shackleton
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