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Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 03 Jun 2020 20:17
by 60022Mallard
I noticed the following message on an eBay item I have up for auction at present with good interest and an existing bid.

"Send offer
Get it sold by sending an offer to buyers interested in your item"


I have not seen this before, nor have I received any offers on items I am watching / bidding on.

Is it a UK or world wide feature?

Do I as a seller potentially miss out on two knock out bids at the end? Do you as a buyer pay more than you might have to without knowing whether there is much interest?

To me it is all a bit underhand, but then it is eBay.

If I send an offer to all 4 people interested so far and sell it to the first responder, how do you feel if you were the bidder and saw the offer of less than your top bid too late?

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 03 Jun 2020 20:41
by Global Administrator
.
Many sellers actively send offers to ''watchers''.

I got one last week offering something at HALF the listed price, and I was near buying it at the initial asking price of $300.

No IQ test required to become an ebay seller! :!:

Maybe he was short of cash, maybe he is an idiot. Maybe both. Anyway the $150 (extra) winner was me. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 03 Jun 2020 21:06
by RomeoLima
Yes quite common, more often on fixed price listing as opposed to auctions.

Quite often I'll "watch" something that I'm interested and as I compare prices/examples. Often I think that it's worth buying at the offered price but want to be sure and then I'll get an offer 10-20% off.

It's a way of getting people to buy, in the same way you would in any other market place. You show an interest in an item at the listed price and the seller offers a discount and you think it must be a bargain so you buy!

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 03 Jun 2020 22:33
by MarkM
I’ve had a few offers in the last few weeks, but I’m buying in the <$10 range, so a 20% discount isn’t that huge, but it is handy.

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 03 Jun 2020 22:57
by 60022Mallard
MarkM

Are you saying the eBay offers are 20% off the starting price?

My item starts at £1 for something that should make at least £10

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 03 Jun 2020 23:13
by Global Administrator
I suspect it is for BIN material or Auction lots with NO bids to the point of offer.

I asked about some housewares tonight for auction $30 start or BIN $50 but NO bids.

Seller asked me to bid $30 and she would then sell to me for $30 and cancel auction which she did. I'd have gladly paid $50 as I think it would have got that if sale ran as scarce vintage material.

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 04 Jun 2020 00:54
by steevh
EBay as ever just trying to generate more cash flow -- any sale is a good sale to eBay.

As a seller, I have full confidence in my own estimates, and would never be hurried by eBay into closing a deal.

Sometimes an auction goes to the sole bidder, but there's often a flurry of interest in the last few minutes, not to mention snipes etc.

If you end early you'll miss all that.

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 04 Jun 2020 03:55
by gavin-h
60022Mallard wrote:
03 Jun 2020 22:57
MarkM

Are you saying the eBay offers are 20% off the starting price?

My item starts at £1 for something that should make at least £10
Sorry to jump in and answer for Mark, but I've had a few of these recently as a buyer, not a seller.

It goes something along the lines of "As you showed an interest in this BIN item at £20, the seller is sending you a special offer to buy it for £16. Note this offer has been sent to others too, so don't dilly dally or you might miss it".

I even had one on an "Open to offers", the price was £39.99, they said £33.99 so I put in an offer of £28 and got it (Don't know who was more surprised at this one - actually, I do, it was me!!!)

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 05 Jun 2020 22:34
by The Pom
One question I'd be interested in getting the answer to:

Does the seller see the individual identities of the potential buyers who have put items on their watch list to whom they are sending offers?

Or do they get an option along the lines of "Someone has put this item on their watch list, you can send them an offer" without ebay disclosing identities?

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 06 Jun 2020 04:23
by colinscovers
Hi

You do not see any "watchers" detail. You get a prompt in your active selling items that you can send an offer at a discount to get it sold. You chose the price you are happy to discount to and it gets sent and they have either 24 or 48 hours to respond to accept the offer.

I currently have about 100 active GBFDC's for sale at a reasonable buy it now price but also says I am open to offers. If I get a prompt I always send an offer to the watcher as they have been listed three months now.

I did say no to a few offers soon after the original listing but said no as just listed. I now regret that decision on some of them. A bird in the hand.....

Depends how much you want to sell.

On the other side I have also had offers from sellers where I have the item in my watch list.

Colin

Re: Official short circuiting of eBay auctions?

Posted: 07 Jun 2020 06:05
by ligneN
Well, I guess quite often ebayers mark items for watch just to see if they get sold at the wanted price.
To have an idea of its value
And yes, the watch can go on for months.

If there are several watcher s and nobody buys, the seller perhaps assumes his wanted price is to high.
Then the seller perhaps sends out a much reduced offer.
Perhaps encouraged by some reminding bot/app, who knows.

In my case a bulky lot (large mug) claimed crazy international postage.
Had it marked on watch for five months. Was the only watcher BTW.
But when reduced 50% price inc. shipping was just bearable and I accepted.
And yes, it was 1970s 2nd hand.