"Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

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Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Old Architect »

Global Administrator wrote:
30 Aug 2020 20:10
.
Paper physical dimensions size might alter by a tiny fraction of a mm after any soaking. Impossible to measure it. :mrgreen:

As outlined clearly above SIZING is an additive to the stamp paper.

Every amateur alchemist witch-doctor who bleaches and fiddles and otherwise degrades stamp paper loses or decreases that sizing, with each mad hatter experiment. Do it several times, and you have a limp and sad and faded blotting paper quality, sad mush. :evil:

Their stamps - they can cut them into pieces if they choose or dip them into tar etc. Seems a shame though.

Glen

Hot topic Sheriff!

In book binding we bathe very old papers with distilled water, sometimes chemicals are introduced, like ethanol, liquid Mylar, et al, in extreme cases, to rinse off debris.

Unless one is a paper restoration specialist the question is rudimentary to me. I.e. your comment that the patinas are preferred to a "cleaned" paper (or coin). I conserve old documents & I can tell you yes, foxing is a problem. One never tries to do anything other than CONSERVE.

This usually means removing dirt, grime, etc., & leaves the document as "original" as possible. That stated, conserved papers, that finish brighter, are not necessarily frowned upon, unless chemically induced. Papers ARE different, requiring different techniques for each, & sizing is a relatively new process.

Old papers often come out "brighter" after common (water) cleansing. Anything that takes away ANY of the original is generally a conservation "No-No" unless it is detrimental to the piece, such as acidic gums, etc.

If there is an element that IS a detriment & can't be removed, every effort is spent in SLOWING the process of degradation.

Having gum definitely throws a "don't touch" into the mix. I would caution anyone attempting any type of "conservation / cleaning." Any good paper conservationist will "ditto" the above.

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Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Catweazle »

Stapper wrote:
22 Jun 2021 01:37
Catweazle wrote:
22 Jun 2021 01:32


Thoughts on these?

Great covers, but far from the best condition. Note those browning hues around the stamps – perhaps a nice hot bath for a start?

Is this the same mess seen throughout these threads? Is it the gum that was effected, and now that's been spreading further afield?

I'm wondering if I should start being real picky about future material, and leave such things behind. These were from a box lot (typical!) – other covers were fine but these not so.



Image

IMHO, If those stamps are not rare, I would throw them away - too much foxing/rust
Is there a safe way to inhibit this rusting process, or will they only get worse over time?

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Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by MJ's pet »


Catweazle wrote:Is there a safe way to inhibit this rusting process, or will they only get worse over time?


If on cover, generally no. Dabbing some rust remover on perf tips is about all you can do. If it is an expensive cover (and I mean expensive), then an archival restorer can remove and inhibit further rust. But the cover really has to be worth it $$$$$.

For an el-cheapo cover (like those shown), simply sell it and replace it.

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Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Stapper »

.
Catweazle wrote:
28 Jun 2021 16:19
Stapper wrote:
22 Jun 2021 01:37
Catweazle wrote:
22 Jun 2021 01:32



Thoughts on these?

Great covers, but far from the best condition. Note those browning hues around the stamps – perhaps a nice hot bath for a start?

Is this the same mess seen throughout these threads? Is it the gum that was effected, and now that's been spreading further afield?

I'm wondering if I should start being real picky about future material, and leave such things behind. These were from a box lot (typical!) – other covers were fine but these not so.



Image



IMHO, If those stamps are not rare, I would throw them away - too much foxing/rust
Is there a safe way to inhibit this rusting process, or will they only get worse over time?
Rust is a fungus and fungus is destroyed when freezing below -20° C. Put them in freezer for a week and the fungus is gone. BTW, This is done when archives are flooded. The spots will still be there.

When washing them with luke warm water and a drop of organic dish washing soap, they can be cleaned but that will destroy the covers.

I did it with stockbooks I bought and where I was not sure if they where not contaminated. After the freezing, let them air for a few weeks and if you smell fungus, trow them away.

Stamps not showing decolloration can be kept but not with other stamps.

BUT, the fungus will be dead, the spores not. And although spores are everywhere, the concentration in the paper will be very high due to the living fungus inside. Those will germ as soon as humidity and temperature are ideal.

If you intend to keep them, keep them separated from the rest of your collection, in a different album and a different cupboard.

Personally, if the stamps are common, I would trow them away.

Hans
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Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by MJ's pet »

Stapper wrote:Personally, if the stamps are common, I would throw them away.


Agree. I wouldn't bother playing amateur chemist. If you have a really valuable stamp or cover that you can't replace, then look at spending some $$ on professional restoration or conservation treatment.

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