Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onwards

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rossi
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Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onwards

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Last edited by rossi on 18 Mar 2015 22:47, edited 15 times in total.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 9 Anne, Cap. 10 - November 25, 1710

An act for establishing a general post office for all her Majesty’s dominions, and for settling a weekly sum out of the revenues thereof, for the service of the war, and other her Majesty’s occasions.

MOST gracious sovereign, whereas by an act made in the twelfth year of the reign of his late majesty King Charles the Second, a general post office was erected and established in that part of Great Britain called England, and by the twentieth act of the fifth session of the first parliament of his late majesty King William the Third, a general post office was erected and established in that part of Great Britain called Scotland, and several rates of postage were thereby severally appointed to be received, under several different powers and authorities ; which two kingdoms being since united, it is most likely that a correspondence by posts will be best managed and ordered for the publick good, by uniting also the said two post offices under one postmaster general : and whereas also posts have at great charges been established by packet boats between that part of Great Britain called England and the West Indies, and also on the main land in North America, through most of her Majesty’s plantations and colonies in those parts, as also to divers parts in Europe, to which no packet boats were till lately settled, and more posts may yet be settled and established for the publick good and welfare of all your Majesty’s subjects : and whereas the several rates of postage may in many parts, with little burthen to the subject, be encreased, and other new rates granted, which additional and new rates may, in some measure, enable your Majesty to carry on and finish the present war, so as suitable powers and authorities be made for collecting the same, and sufficient provision be made, as well for preventing the undue collecting the delivery of letters by private posts, carriers, biglers, watermen, drivers of stage coaches, and other persons, as all other frauds to which the revenue might otherwise be liable ; which cannot be well and properly done, to answer the ends aforesaid, without the authority of parliament in a new act to be made for the said office, and for the revenues to arise thereby : we therefore your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the commons of Great Britain in parliament assembled, do most humbly beseech your Majesty, that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the Queen’s most excellent majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and commons, in this present parliament assembled, and by authority of the same, That the said act made in England in the twelfth year of the reign of his said late majesty King Charles the Second, intituled, An act for erecting and establishing a post office, and the said act made in Scotland in the fifth session of the first parliament of his said late majesty King William the Third, intituled, An act anent the post office, and every article, clause, and thing therein or in either of them contained, shall be, and is and are hereby, from and after the first day of June, one thousand seven hundred and eleven, actually repealed, except as is herein after mentioned.

II. And to the end a general post office may be established for and throughout her Majesty’s kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, her colonies and plantations in North America, and the West Indies, and all other her Majesty’s dominions and territories, in such manner as may be most beneficial to the people of these kingdoms, and her Majesty may be supplied, and the revenue arising by the said office better improved, settled, and secured to her Majesty, her heirs and successors, in such manner as is herein after mentioned ; be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the said first day of June, one thousand seven hundred and eleven, there be from thenceforth one general letter office and post office erected and established in some convenient place within the city of London, from whence all letters and packets whatsoever may be with speed and expedition sent into any part of the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, or to North America, the West Indies, or to any other of her Majesty’s dominions or territories, or unto any other kingdom or country beyond the seas, at which said office all returns and answers may be likewise received ; and that one master of the said general letter office and post office shall be, from time to time, appointed by the Queen’s majesty, her heirs and successors, to be made and constituted by letters patents under the great seal of Great Britain, by the name and stile of her Majesty’s postmaster general ; which said master of the said office, and his deputy and deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, and his and their servants and agents, and no other person or persons whatsoever, shall, from time to time, and at all times, have the receiving, taking up, ordering, dispatching, sending post, or with speed, carrying and delivering of all letters and packets whatsoever, which shall, from time to time, and at all or any times, be sent to and from all and every the parts and places of Great Britain and Ireland, North America, the West Indies, and other her Majesty’s dominions, and also to and from all and every the kingdoms and countries beyond the seas, where he shall settle or cause to be settled posts, or running messengers for that purpose : except such letters as shall respectively concern goods sent by common known carriers of goods by carts, waggons, or pack horses, and shall be respectively delivered with the goods such letters do concern, without hire or reward, or other profit or advantage for receiving or delivering such letters ; and except letters of merchants, and masters, owners of any ships, barques, or vessels of merchandize, or any the cargo or loading therein sent on board such ships, barques, or vessels of merchandize, whereof such merchants or masters are owners, as aforesaid, and delivered by any masters of any such ships, barques, or vessels of merchandize, or by any other person employed by them for the carriage of such letters aforesaid according, to their respective directions, so as such letters be delivered to the respective persons to whom they shall be directed without paying or receiving any hire or reward, advantage, or profit for the same in any wise ; and also except commissions, or the return thereof, affidavits, writs, process, or proceedings or returns thereof, issuing out of any court ; and also any letter or letters to be sent by any private friend or friends, in their way of journey or travel, or by any messenger or messengers sent on purpose for or concerning the private affair of any person or persons.

III. Provided always nevertheless, That nothing in the said exception contained shall extend or be construed to extend to give any licence or authority to any common known carriers of goods by carts, waggons, or pack horses, their servants or agents, to receive, collect, or deliver, with or without hire, any letter or letters, packet or packets of letters whatsoever, that do not concern goods in their carts, waggons, or on their pack horses, nor to any owners or drivers of stage coaches, nor to any owners, masters, or commanders of boats called passage boats, sailing between any part of Great Britain or Ireland, and any parts or places beyond the seas, or their servants or agents, nor to any passenger or passengers on board such boats or vessels, nor to the owners or watermen on board of any boat, barge, or vessel passing or repassing on any river or rivers, to and from any parts of Great Britain and Ireland, North America, or the West Indies, or other her Majesty’s dominions and territories, although such drivers of stage coaches, owners, masters, or commanders of boats called passage boats, or passengers therein, owners or watermen on board of any such boat, barge, or vessel passing or repassing on any such river or rivers, as aforesaid, do not receive any hire or reward, or other advantage for the same ; but that all such carriers, owners, and drivers of stage coaches, owners, masters, or commanders of passage boats, and the passengers therein, and all owners and watermen on board of any boat, barge, or vessel passing or repassing on any river or rivers, to or from any the parts and places aforesaid, collecting and delivering letters, as aforesaid, though without hire or reward, shall be deemed and taken, and are hereby declared to be persons offending against this act, and shall forfeit and pay such sum and sums of money, as persons collecting, receiving, taking up, conveying and delivering of letters for hire, or setting up, employing and maintaining any post contrary to this act, or that are or shall be concerned therein, are herein after enacted to forfeit and pay.

IV. And to the end there may be one chief letter office also in North Britain and Ireland, and at New York in North America, and in the West Indies, from whence the distances for which the rates hereby granted may be computed and settled ; be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That such postmaster general so to be constituted, as aforesaid, shall be at liberty to keep one chief letter office in the city of Edinburgh, and one other chief letter office in the city of Dublin, and one chief letter office in New York aforesaid, and other chief offices at some convenient place or places in each of her Majesty’s provinces or colonies in America, and in each of the islands in the West Indies, called the Leward Islands, and appoint sufficient deputies under him, for the better managing, ordering, collecting, and improving the revenue hereby granted.

V. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That such postmaster general for the time being, as shall from time to time be made and constituted by her Majesty, her heirs and successors, and the respective deputies or substitutes of such postmaster general, and no other person or persons whatsoever, shall prepare and provide horses and furniture, to let to hire unto all or any person or persons riding in post, by commission or without, to or from all and every the parts and places of Great Britain and Ireland, where any post-roads are or shall be settled and established.

VI. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for such postmaster general to be constituted and appointed, as aforesaid, and his deputy and deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the use of her Majesty, her heirs and successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the portage, and conveyance of all such letters and packets which he shall so convey, carry, or send post, as aforesaid, and for the providing and furnishing horses for persons riding in post, as aforesaid, according to the several rates and sums of lawful British money hereafter mentioned, not to exceed the same : ( that is to say ) for the port of every single letter, or piece of paper, to or from any place not exceeding eighty English miles distant from the said general post-office in London, and within that part of Great Britain called England, and not coming from or directed on ship-board, three pence ; and for the like port of every double letter, six Pence ; and so proportionably unto the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every packet of writs, deeds, and other things, after the rate of twelve pence of British money for every ounce weight ; and for the port of every single letter, or piece of paper, to or from any place above eighty such English miles distant from the said general post-office, and within that part of the kingdom of Great Britain called England, or to the town of Berwick upon Tweed, and not coming from or directed on ship-board, four pence ; and for the like port of every double letter eight pence ; and so proportionably unto the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every packet of writs, deeds, and other things, after the rate of one shilling and four pence British money for every ounce weight : and for the port of every single letter, or piece of paper, from the said general post-office in London unto the city of Edinburgh, in that part of Great Britain called Scotland, or from thence to the said general post-office in the city of London, and to and from Dumfreys, or Cockburnspeth, and between either of those places and the said city of Edinburgh, not coming from, or directed on board any ship, six pence ; and for the like port of every double letter, twelve pence ; and so proportionably unto the said rates, for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every packet of writs, deeds, and other things, after the rate of two shillings British money for every ounce weight ; and for the port of every single letter, or piece of paper, to or from the chief post-office in the said city of Edinburgh, to or from any place not exceeding fifty such English miles distant from the said chief post-office in Edinburgh, and within that part of the kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland, and not coming from, or directed on board of any ship or vessel, two pence British money ; and for the like port of every double letter, four pence of like money ; and so proportionably to the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every packet of writs, deeds, and other things, after the rate of eight pence British money for every ounce weight ; and for the port of every single letter or piece of paper, to or from any place above fifty such miles distant from the said chief office in Edinburgh, and not exceeding eighty such miles, and within that part of Great Britain called Scotland, and not coming from, or directed on ship-board, three pence ; and for the like port of every double letter, six pence ; and so proportionably to the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every packet of writs, deeds, and other things, after the rate of twelve pence British money for every ounce weight ; and for the port of every single letter, or piece or paper, to or from any place above eighty English miles distant from the said chief office in Edinburgh, and within that part of Great Britain called Scotland, and not coming from or directed on ship-board, four pence British money ; and for the like port of every double letter, eight pence ; and so proportionably to the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every packet of writs, deeds, and other things, after the rate of one shilling and four pence British money for every ounce weight : and for the port of every single letter, or piece of paper, from the said general letter office in London, unto the city of Dublin in Ireland, or from the said city of Dublin in Ireland, unto the said general post-office, and not coming from, or directed on board of any ship, six pence of British money ; and for the like port of every double letter, twelve pence British money ; and so proportionably unto the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every other packet of writs, deeds, and other things of greater bulk, two shillings of British money for every ounce weight ; and for the port of such letters or packets as shall be conveyed or carried from the chief post-office in the said city of Dublin, unto any other place or places within the kingdom of Ireland, or from any other place within the said kingdom, not coming from, or directed on ship-board, according to the rates and sums of British money hereafter following, ( viz. ) for the port of every single letter from the chief post-office in the said city of Dublin, to or from any place not exceeding forty English miles distant from the said chief office in Dublin, and within the said kingdom of Ireland, not coming from, or directed on ship-board, two pence ; and for the like port of every double letter, four pence ; and so proportionably unto the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every other packet of writs, deeds, or other things, after the rate of eight pence for every ounce weight ; and for the port of every single letter or piece of paper, to or from any place above forty English miles distant from the said chief office in Dublin, and within the said kingdom of Ireland, and not coming from, or directed on board of any ship or vessel, four pence ; and for the like port of every double letter, eight pence ; and so proportionably unto the said rates for the port of every packet of letters ; and for the like port of every packet of writs, deeds, and other things, after the rate of one shilling and four pence for every ounce weight : and for the port of all and every the letters and packets of letters directed on board, or fetched or brought from on board any ship or vessel, riding or stopping in any port within her Majesty’s dominions, the sum of one penny, over and above the rates granted in and by this act : and for the port of all and every the letters and packets, passing or repassing by the carriage called the penny-post, established and settled within the cities of London and Westminster, and borough of Southwark, and parts adjacent, and to be received and delivered within ten English miles distant from the said general letter-office in London, one penny : and for the port of all and every the letters, packets, and parcels of goods that shall be carried or conveyed to or from any of her Majesty’s said dominions, to or from any other parts or places beyond the seas, according to the several and respective rates following, the same being rated either by the letter or by the ounce ; that is to say,

All letters and packets coming from any part of France to London,
  • Single, ten pence.
  • Double, one shilling eight pence.
  • Treble, two shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, three shillings four pence.
All letters and packets passing from London, through France, to any part Spain or Portugal ( port paid to Bayone ) and from Spain and Portugal, through France, unto London,
  • Single, one shilling six pence.
  • Double, three shillings.
  • Treble, four shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, six shillings.
All letters and packets passing from London, through France, to any part of Italy, or Sicily, by the way of Lyons ; or to any part of Turkey, by the way of Mercelia, and from any of those parts, through France, unto London,
  • Single, one shilling three pence.
  • Double, two shillings six pence.
  • Treble, three shillings nine pence.
  • Ounce, five shillings.
All letters and packets coming from part of the Spanish Netherlands, unto London,
  • Single, ten pence.
  • Double, one shilling eight pence.
  • Treble, two shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, three shillings four pence.
All letters and packets passing from London through the Spanish Netherlands to any part of Italy or Sicily ( port paid to Antwerp ) and from any part of Italy or Sicily, through the Spanish Netherlands unto London,
  • Single, one shilling.
  • Double, two shillings.
  • Treble, three shillings.
  • Ounce, four shillings.
All letters and packets passing from London through the Spanish Netherlands to any part of Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, and all parts of the north, and from any of those parts through the Spanish Netherlands unto London,
  • Single, one shilling.
  • Double, two shillings.
  • Treble, three shillings.
  • Ounce, four shillings.
All letters and packets passing from London through the Spanish Netherlands to any part of Spain or Portugal, and from any part of Spain or Portugal, through the Spanish Netherlands unto London,
  • Single, one shilling six pence.
  • Double, three shillings.
  • Treble, four shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, six shillings.
All letters and packets passing from any part of the United Provinces, unto London,
  • Single, ten pence.
  • Double, one shilling eight pence.
  • Treble, two shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, three shillings four pence.
All letters and packets passing from London through the United Provinces for any part of Italy or Sicily, and from any part of Italy or Sicily, through the United Provinces, unto London,
  • Single, one shilling.
  • Double, two shillings.
  • Treble, three shillings.
  • Ounce, four shillings.
All letters and packets passing from London through the United Provinces to any part of Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Sweden, and all parts of the north, and from any of those parts and places, through the United Provinces unto London,
  • Single, one shilling.
  • Double, two shillings.
  • Treble, three shillings.
  • Ounce, four shillings.
All letters and packets passing from London through the United Provinces unto any part of Spain or Portugal, and from any part of Spain or Portugal, through the United Provinces unto London,
  • Single, one shilling six pence.
  • Double, three shillings.
  • Treble, four shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, six shillings.
All letters and packets passing from London through the Spanish Netherlands, or the United Provinces, to Hamburgh ( port paid to Antwerp or Amsterdam ) and from Hamburgh, through the Spanish Netherlands, or the United Provinces unto London,
  • Single, ten pence.
  • Double, one shilling eight pence.
  • Treble, two shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, three shillings four pence.
All letters and packets passing between London, Spain, or Portugal, by packet boats,
  • Single, one shilling six pence.
  • Double, three shillings.
  • Treble, four shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, six shillings.
All letters and packets passing from London unto Jamaica, Barbadoes, Antegoa, Montserrat, Nevis, and Saint Christophers in America, and from any of those places to London,
  • Single, one shilling six pence.
  • Double, three shillings.
  • Treble, four shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, six shillings.
All letters and packets from London to New York in North America, and thence to London,
  • Single, one shilling.
  • Double, two shillings.
  • Treble, three shillings.
  • Ounce, four shillings.
All letters and packets from any part of the West Indies, to New York, aforesaid,
  • Single, four pence.
  • Double, eight pence.
  • Treble, one shilling.
  • Ounce, one shilling and four pence.
All letters and packets from New York, to any place within sixty English miles thereof, and thence back to New York,
  • Single, four pence.
  • Double, eight pence.
  • Treble, one shilling.
  • Ounce, one shilling and four pence.
All letters and packets from New York to Perth Amboy, the chief town in East New Jersey, and to Bridlington, the chief town in West New Jersey, and from each of those places back to New York, and from New York, to any place not exceeding one hundred English miles, and from each of those places to New York,
  • Single, six pence.
  • Double, one shilling.
  • Treble, one shilling and six pence.
  • Ounce, two shillings.
All letters and packets from Perth Amboy and Bridlington to any place not exceeding sixty English miles, thence back again,
  • Single, four pence.
  • Double, eight pence.
  • Treble, one shilling.
  • Ounce, one shilling and four pence.
All letters and packets from Perth Amboy and Bridlington, to any place not exceeding one hundred English miles, and thence back again
  • Single, six pence.
  • Double, one shilling.
  • Treble, one shilling six pence.
  • Ounce, two shillings.
All letters and packets from New York to New London, the chief town in Connecticute in New England, and to Philadelphia the chief town in Pensilvania, and from those places back to New York,
  • Single, nine pence.
  • Double, one shilling six pence.
  • Treble, two shillings three pence.
  • Ounce, three shillings.
All letters and packets from New London and Philadelphia, to any place not exceeding sixty English miles, and thence back again,
  • Single, four pence.
  • Double, eight pence.
  • Treble, one shilling.
  • Ounce, one shilling four pence.
All letters and packets from New London and Philadelphia, to any place, not exceeding one hundred English miles, and so back again,
  • Single, six pence.
  • Double, one shilling.
  • Treble, one shilling six pence.
  • Ounce, two shillings.
All letters and packets from New York aforesaid to New Port the chief town in Rhode Island, and Providence Plantation in New England, and to Boston the chief town in Massachusets bay in New England aforesaid, and to Portsmouth the chief town in New Hampshire in New England aforesaid, and to Annapolis the chief town in Maryland, and from every of those places to New York,
  • Single, one shilling.
  • Double, two shillings.
  • Treble, three shillings.
  • Ounce, four shillings.
All letters and packets from Newport, Boston, Portsmouth, and Annapolis aforesaid, to any place not exceeding sixty English miles, and thence back again,
  • Single, four pence.
  • Double, eight pence.
  • Treble, one shilling.
  • Ounce, one shilling four pence.
All letters and packets from Newport, Boston, Portsmouth, and Annapolis aforesaid, to any place not exceeding one hundred English miles, and thence back again,
  • Single, six pence.
  • Double, one shilling.
  • Treble, one shilling six pence.
  • Ounce, two shillings.
All letters and packet from New York aforesaid, to the chief offices in Salem and Ipswich, and to the chief office in Piscataway, and to Williamsburgh the chief office in Virginia, and from every of those places to New York,
  • Single, one shilling three pence.
  • Double, two shillings six pence.
  • Treble, three shillings nine pence.
  • Ounce, five shillings.
All letters and packets from the chief offices in Salem, Ipswich, Piscataway, and Williamsburgh aforesaid, to any place not exceeding sixty English miles, and thence back again,
  • Single, four pence.
  • Double, eight pence.
  • Treble, one shilling.
  • Ounce, one shilling four pence.
All letters and packets from the chief offices in Salem, Ipswich, Piscataway, and Williamsburgh, aforesaid, to any place not exceeding one hundreds English miles, and thence back again,
  • Single, six pence.
  • Double, one shilling.
  • Treble, one shilling six pence.
  • Ounce, two shillings.
All letters and packets from New York aforesaid, to Charles Town, the town in North and South Carolina, and from Charles Town aforesaid, to New York,
  • Single, one shilling six pence.
  • Double, three shillings.
  • Treble, four shillings six pence.
  • Ounce, six shillings.
All letters and packets from Charles Town aforesaid, to any place not exceeding sixty English miles, and thence back again,
  • Single, four pence.
  • Double, eight pence.
  • Treble, one shilling.
  • Ounce, one shilling four pence.
All letters and packets from Charles Town aforesaid, to any place not exceeding one hundred English miles, and thence back again,
  • Single, six pence.
  • Double, one shilling.
  • Treble, one shilling six pence.
  • Ounce, two shillings.
VII. And be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That such postmaster general so to be appointed, as aforesaid, shall and may receive and take, according to the same rates and proportions for the port of letters, packets, and parcels, to or from any of the parts or places beyond the seas, where posts have not been heretofore settled, and may hereafter be settled by such postmaster general for the time being.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That all letters and packets directed to, or coining from any of the foreign parts or places aforesaid, and collected or delivered at any part or place between London and any of the ports from whence any of her Majesty’s packet boats shall at any time hereafter sail, or at which they shall or may arrive with the foreign mails, do pay the same rates as if the same were conveyed in the said mails to or from London.

IX. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That such postmaster general shall be at liberty to keep and maintain packet boats to go weekly ( wind and weather permitting ) to and from Donachadee, or some other convenient port in Ireland, to Port Patrick, or some other convenient port in that part of Great Britain called Scotland, for conveyance of letters and packets for the conveniency of trade and commerce between the said kingdoms, paying over and above the inland rates hereby rated and appointed to be received for such letters and packets, at the place where such letter or letters are delivered in to be sent by such packet boats, according to the rates following ; that is to say, For every such single letter two pence, double four pence, treble six pence, ounce eight pence.

X. And forasmuch as it may be convenient to erect some cross stages for the better maintaining of trade and commerce, and mutual correspondencies, and to settle the rates for all by or way letters and packets conveyed by post in any of the said kingdoms ; be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the said first day of June, one thousand seven hundred and eleven, it shall and may be lawful to and for the postmaster general for the time being, so constituted, as aforesaid, to erect and set up cross stages to and from any place or places whatsoever ; and thereupon such postmaster general, and his deputy and deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, shall and may lawfully demand, have, receive, and take for the postage and conveyance, as well of all such letters and packets which he or they shall so convey, carry, or send post, as aforesaid, in any such cross stages, as for all by or way letters and packets, the same rates in proportion to the distances of the places to which they shall be directed from the places at which they shall be put in, as letters and packets conveyed and re-conveyed to and from London, are rated to pay.

XI. And for the better reducing all miles in both the said kingdoms throughout all the post roads within one hundred miles distance from the said chief offices, and in the cross roads now settled, or hereafter to be settled, to one and the same measure and standard ; and for preventing disputes touching the same ; be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for such person and persons as the postmaster general for the time being shall appoint, to measure, or cause to be measured, by the wheel, all roads, except such roads where stages are already settled ; and that such person or persons so to be authorized, shall cause fair surveys or books to be made for each of the said kingdoms ; one of each whereof to be left with her Majesty’s postmaster general in London ; another of each to be left at the chief post office in Edinburgh, with the postmaster general’s deputy there ; another of each to be left at the chief post office in Dublin, with the postmaster general’s deputy there, to remain in the said post offices ; and each of which said books shall be signed by such person or persons making the same, and by the postmaster general for the time being, and his deputies in such general offices in each kingdom, and the comptrollers and surveyors belonging or to belong to the said general post offices in London, Edinburgh, and Dublin : which books or surveys shall ascertain and determine the distances on all the said roads.

XII. Provided always, That such person or persons who shall be authorized to measure the said distances, and every of them, shall be sworn to perform the same, according to the best of their skill and judgment ; which oath shall and may be administred by any of her Majesty’s justices of the peace in the said kingdoms respectively, who shall make a certificate thereof in writing, to be entred in the three general post offices aforesaid, without fee or charge.

XIII. Provided always, That all merchants accounts not exceeding one sheet of paper, and all bills of exchange, invoices, and bills of lading, are, and shall hereby be understood to be allowed without rate in the price of the letters ; and likewise the covers of letters, not exceeding one fourth part of a sheet of paper, sent by the way of Vienna, Marseilles, Venice, or Leghorne, to be sent to or from Turkey, shall be understood to be allowed to pass without rate or payment for the same.

XIV. And in regard the said postmaster general and his deputies are obliged, as well for performing the duties of the several stages of Great Britain and Ireland, as for furnishing such as ride post with horses and furniture, to be at great charge to maintain a convenient number of servants, horses, and furniture ; be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for such postmaster general and his deputy and deputies, to ask, demand, take and receive of every person, that he or they shall furnish and provide with horses and furniture, or with horses, furniture, and guide, to ride post in any of the post roads, as aforesaid, three pence of British money for each and every horse-hire or postage for every English mile, and four pence of like money for the person riding as guide for every stage ; and the deputy or deputies of such postmaster general shall not charge any person riding post, for the carrying of any bundle or parcel of goods, carried along with them, in their way of travel, so as any such bundle or parcel of goods do not exceed the weight of eighty pounds averdupois, to be laid on the horse rid by the guide, and no deputy shall be obliged to carry above that weight for any person riding post.

XV. And whereas, upon the arrival of ships from parts beyond the seas, into several ports within her Majesty’s dominions, many letters directed to several merchants and others, have been either imbezilled or long detained, to the great damage of the merchants and others, to whom the same were directed, in want of that speedy advice and intelligence, which they might had, if the same had been forthwith dispatched by the settled posts, and sometimes such letters have been delivered by the masters or passengers of such ships, to ignorant and loose hands that understand not the ways and means of speedy conveyance and delivery of letters, whereby great prejudice hath accrued to the affairs of merchants and others, as well by the miscarriage of many letters so brought, as oftentimes by the opening the same, to the discovery of the correspondency and secrets of the merchants ; be it therefore further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all letters and packets, that by any master of any ship or vessel, or any of his company, or any passengers therein, shall or may be brought to any port town, or which shall arrive or touch at any port belonging to any port town, within any her Majesty’s dominions, or any the members thereof, or which shall be on board any ship or vessel, that shall do touch or stay at any such port town ( other than such letters as are before excepted, or may be sent by common known carriers in manner aforesaid, or by a friend, as aforesaid ) shall, by such master, passenger, or other person or persons, be forthwith delivered unto the deputy or deputies only of such postmaster general for the time being, by him appointed, for such place or port town, and to be by such deputy or deputies sent post unto the said general post office, to be delivered according to the several and respective directions of the same, upon pain of forfeiting the sum of five pounds of British money, for every several offence against the tenor of this present act.

XVI. And for the encouragement of all such masters of ships or vessels, or such other persons, on their arrival at such ports, as aforesaid, from any parts beyond the seas, to deliver unto the deputy or deputies of such postmaster general for such place or port town at which they shall so touch or arrive, all such letters and packets as they shall respectively have on board such vessel or vessels, every such master or other persons, for every letter or packet of letters he or they shall so deliver unto such deputy or deputies, shall receive the sum of one penny, of such deputy or deputies, he or they signing a certificate of the number of letters delivered, and by what vessel they came, and of the time when he or they delivered the fame to such deputy or deputies, and giving a receipt for such number of pence as he or they shall receive of such deputy or deputies ; which certificate and receipt shall be by such deputy by the next post returned to the said postmaster general, together with the letters so delivered, who shall have credit on his account for so much money as any such deputy shall pay on that account.

XVII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no person or persons whatsoever, or body politick or corporate, in any part of these kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, or other her Majesty’s plantations and colonies in the West Indies and America, other than such postmaster general as shall, from time to time, be nominated and appointed by her Majesty, her heirs and successors, and constituted by letters patents under the great seal of Great Britain, as aforesaid, and his and deputies, or assigns, shall presume to receive, take up, order, dispatch, convey, carry, recarry, or deliver any letter or letters, packet or packets of letters ( other than as before excepted ) or make any collection of letters, or set up or employ any foot post, horse post, or packet boat, or other vessel or boat, or other person or persons, conveyance or conveyances whatsoever, for the receiving, taking up, ordering, dispatching, conveying, carrying, recarrying, or delivering any letter or letters, packet or packets of letters, by sea or by land, or on any river, within her Majesty’s dominions, or by means whereof any letter or letters, packet or packets of letters, shall be collected, received, taken up, ordered, dispatched, conveyed, carried, recarried, or delivered, by sea or land, or on any river, within her Majesty’s dominions ( other than as before excepted ) or shall presume to keep, provide, and maintain horses, or furniture for the horsing of any person or persons riding post, that is to say, riding several stages upon a post road, and changing horses, or shall lett to hire, or furnish any person or persons whatsoever with horses or furniture for riding post, as aforesaid, on any of the post roads or stages now or hereafter to be appointed, with or without a guide or horn, for hire or reward, or on any agreement or promise of reward, or whereby he or they may have any profit or advantage ; on pain forfeiting the sum of five pounds of British money for every several offence against the tenor of this present act, and also of the sum of one hundred pounds of like British money for every week that any offender against this act shall collect, receive, take up, order, dispatch, convey, carry, recarry, or deliver any letter or letters, packet or packets of letters, by sea or land, or on any river, within her Majesty’s dominions ( other than as before excepted ) or that shall presume to set up, continue, or employ any foot post, horse post, or packet boat, or other vessel or boat, or any other person or persons, conveyance or conveyances whatsoever, for the receiving, taking up, ordering, dispatching, conveying, carrying, recarrying, or delivering of any letter or letters, packet or packets of letters, by sea or land, or on any river, within her Majesty’s dominions, as aforesaid.

XVIII. And whereas divers deputy postmasters do collect great quantities of post letters called by or way letters, and by clandestine and private agreements amongst themselves, do convey the same post in their respective mails, or by bags, according to their several directions, without accounting for the same, or endorsing the same on their bills, to the great detriment of her Majesty s revenues : for preventing whereof for the time to come ; be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if at any time hereafter, any person or persons employed as a deputy postmaster, or otherwise, in these kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, or in any of her Majesty’s dominions and territories in the West Indies, or in North America, shall not duly answer and account to her Majesty, her heirs and successors, for all such by or way letters as such deputy of deputies, or any by his, her, or their order shall receive the port for, or that shall not on his or her post bills exactly mention all the by or way letters he, she, or they shall or do receive, or which shall come to his, her, or their hand or hands, custody or power, distinguishing them severally, whether single, double, treble, or ounce weight, or that shall destroy or embezil any such by letter or by letters, packet or packets of letters ; every such person so offending shall forfeit and pay for every such offence, such penalties and forfeitures, as the persons herein before prohibited, setting up or employing other posts, or collecting, carrying, recarrying, ordering, dispatching, or delivering letters and packets contrary hereunto, are enacted to forfeit and pay.

XIX. And it is hereby enacted, That all and singular the said several penalties and forfeitures by this act imposed on any offender or offenders against the same, or any part thereof, shall and may be sued for and recovered by action or actions of debt, bill, plaint, or information, in any of her Majesty’s courts of record, wherein no effoin, privilege, protection, or wager of law shall be admitted ; and the said several and respective penalties and forfeitures, that shall happen from time to time to be recovered, shall be and remain, the one moiety thereof to her Majesty, her heirs and successors, and the other moiety thereof to such person or persons who shall or will inform against the offender or offenders against this present act, and shall and will sue for the said penalties and forfeitures upon the same ; and on every such recovery, such person or persons so informing, and prosecuting for the said penalties and forfeitures, shall recover, and have also taxed and paid, their full costs of suit.

XX. Provided always, That if any postmaster of any respective stages on any post-roads, in any her Majesty’s dominions, now settled, or hereafter to be settled, doth not or cannot furnish any person or persons riding in post, with sufficient horses within the space of one half hour after demand, that then such person or persons is and are hereby understood to be left at liberty to provide themselves as conveniently as they can to the next stage, and so at every stage where he or they shall not be furnished, as aforesaid ; and the person or persons who shall furnish such horses, shall not therefore be liable to any penalties or forfeitures contained in this act, by reason thereof.

XXI. Provided always, That if through default or neglect the postmaster general, or his deputy for the time being, any person or persons riding in post, shall fail, as aforesaid, of being furnished with a sufficient horse or horses, for his or their use after demand, as aforesaid, that then and in every such case the postmaster general or his deputy, so offending, shall forfeit the sum of five pounds sterling ; the one moiety to her Majesty, her heirs and successors, and the other moiety to him or them who shall sue for the same in any court of record, to be and divided, as aforesaid.

XXII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall be understood to prohibit the carrying or re-carrying of any letters or packets, to or from any town or place, to or from the next respective post-road or stage appointed for that purpose, above six miles from the said general post-office, or the chief offices of Edinburgh and Dublin, but that every person shall have free liberty to send and employ such person or persons as they shall think fit for to carry the said letters or packets, as aforesaid, without any forfeiture or penalty therefore ; any thing herein contained to the contrary notwithstanding.

XXIII. Provided always nevertheless, That nothing herein contained hall be construed to extend to give licence to any person or persons whatsoever, to make collection of letters in or near the city of London, or suburbs thereof, under pretence of conveying the same to any parts or places in the said city or suburbs, or to the general office of the said city, without the licence and leave of the postmaster general for the time being : and any person or persons acting contrary hereunto shall forfeit and pay as persons collecting, receiving, carrying, re-carrying, and delivering letters contrary to this act, are hereby enacted to forfeit and pay, to be recovered, as aforesaid, and with full costs of suit.

XXIV. Provided always, That if the packet or mail shall be carried out of Great Britain into any part or place beyond the seas, in any ship or vessel which is not a free ship, and navigated with such seamen as, by the laws of this land, the same are required to be, that then, and in every such case, the postmaster general for the time being shall forfeit the sum of one hundred pounds sterling, the one moiety to her Majesty, her heirs and successors, and the other moiety to him or them who shall sue for the same in any court of record, to be recovered by bill, plaint, or other information, wherein no effoin, protection, or wager at law shall be allowed.

XXV. Provided always, and be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That such postmaster general, and all officers and deputies acting under him, and all officers belonging to the said general post-office, within that part of the said united kingdom called England, receiving the sacrament according to the usage of the church of England, and taking, making, and subscribing the test, and the oaths of allegiance and supremacy, and abjuration, appointed by any of the laws of the said part of the said united kingdom, to be taken, made, and subscribed by officers in publick places of trust in the government, and within such times, and in such places as are particularly appointed by any of those laws for doing the same, shall be deemed and taken to be sufficiently qualified to act in their respective stations and duties, and to execute their respective employments throughout the said whole united kingdom, and all other her Majesty’s dominions, and shall not incur any penalties, forfeitures, or disabilities, for not taking the oaths of allegiance and abjuration, and subscribing the assurance appointed by any the laws of that part of the said united kingdom called Scotland, or by any law or laws of the said united kingdom of Great Britain, to be taken and made by any person in publick trust, notwithstanding such postmaster general, and such deputies and officers, shall exercise their respective offices and employments within all and every the parts and places of that part of the said united kingdom called Scotland : and all deputies and agents acting under such postmaster general within that part of the said united kingdom called Scotland, taking and making the oaths of allegiance and abjuration, and subscribing the same, with the assurance appointed by any of the laws of the said part of the said united kingdom called Scotland, or by any law or laws of the said united kingdom of Great Britain, to be taken and made by any person in publick trust, and within such times, and at such places, as are particularly appointed by any of those laws for doing the same, shall be deemed and taken to be sufficiently qualified to execute and exercise their respective employments in the said office throughout the said whole united kingdom, and all other her Majesty’s dominions ; any act or acts of parliament in either of the said united kingdoms at any time heretofore made to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.

XXVI. Provided also, and be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That a letter or packet post shall twice every week come by the way of Trurow and Penrin to the town of Penzance, in the county of Cornwall ; and once a week to Kendall, by the way of Lancaster ; and to the town of Penrith in Cumberland, by the way of Newcastle and Carlisle ; and to the city of Lincoln and the borough of Grimsby, in the county of Lincoln ; any thing in this act contained to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.

XXVII. And for the better management of the said post-office, and that the people of these kingdoms may have their intercourse of commerce and trade the better maintained, and their letters and advices conveyed, carried, and re-carried with the greatest speed, security, and conveniency that may be ; be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the said postmaster general so nominated, appointed, and constituted, as aforesaid, and his deputies, shall, from time to time, observe and follow such orders, rules, directions, and instructions for and concerning the settlement of posts and stages upon the several roads in Great Britain and Ireland, and other her Majesty’s dominions, and the providing and keeping a sufficient number of horses at the several stages, as well for the carrying and conveying the said letters and packets, as for the horsing of all persons riding in post by warrant, or otherwise, as aforesaid, as her Majesty, her heirs and successors, shall, from time to time, in that behalf make and ordain.

XXVIII. Provided always, and be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no person or persons shall have power to take, use, or seize any horses for the services mentioned in this act, without the consent of the owner or owners thereof ; any law, statute, usage, or custom to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.

XXIX. And forasmuch as the post must necessarily pass several ferries in North America, in which the ferrymen give great delays, and sometimes have endeavoured to exact money from them, notwithstanding the same have always been free for the post ; be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no deputy or agent of such postmaster general, travelling with any mail of letters, shall pay any thing for passing or repassing any ferry within any of the colonies or plantations of her said Majesty in North America aforesaid ; but such ferrymen shall forthwith, within one half hour after demand, convey such deputies, on pain of forfeiting for every offence the sum of five pounds, to be recovered in any court of record within any of the provinces or colonies in North America, by bill, plaint, or information, where in no effoin, protection, or wager of law shall be allowed ; one moiety thereof to her Majesty, her heirs and successors, towards the support of the government of the said provinces, and the contingent charges thereof ; and the other moiety to the postmaster general, who shall sue and prosecute for the same, together with full costs of suit.

XXX. And whereas many persons having received their letters, refuse to pay for the same, or often run in debt for the postage their letters, or having received some small sum for the port of letters, which sums being very small in particular, are properly to be recovered in a summary way ; be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all sum and sums of money, not exceeding five pounds, that now is, or shall be due from any person or persons for letters or packets, or any letter or packet, to them delivered by any deputy or deputies of such postmaster general, or which now is, or shall be due from any person persons for the port of letters or packets to them delivered by any deputy or agent of such postmaster general, not exceeding the said value, or which have been, or shall be received for the port of letters, not exceeding the same value, without answering or paying the monies so due and owing to the receiver general of the said revenues for her Majesty’s use, shall be recovered before justices of the peace, in the same manner, and under the same rules, as small tithes are, by the laws of England, to be recovered ; and such debt or sums of money shall be preferable in payment by the person owing the same, or from whose estate the same is or shall be due, before any debt of sort to any private person whomsoever.

XXXI. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all inland letters sent by any packet post established by this act, as aforesaid, do and shall pay the rates and prices before mentioned at such stages at which they are last delivered only, unless the party that doth put in the letters desireth to pay elsewhere, and unless any such letters are directed on board any ship or vessel, or to any person in the army, or are sent by the penny-post, and unless they be letters or packets going out of Great Britain, which have usually paid the rates in England ; any thing in this act contained to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.

XXXII. Provided always, That this act, or any thing therein contained, shall not in any wise be prejudicial to the privileges of the two universities of Oxford and Cambridge, or either of them, or to the chancellors or scholars of the same, or their successors, but that they may use and enjoy such privileges as heretofore they have lawfully used and enjoyed, and that all letters and other things may be sent or conveyed to or from the said two universities in manner as heretofore hath been used ; any thing herein to the contrary notwithstanding.

XXXIII. Provided always, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the postmaster general for the time being, his deputy and deputies, to continue by-bags for collecting and delivering of by-letters as hath been heretofore accustomed ; such deputy and deputies duly accounting to, and paying the respective ports thereof to the receiver general of the said revenue for the time being, for the use of her Majesty, her heirs and successors.

XXXIV. Provided always, and be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all and every sum and sums of money which shall or may be due and owing to her Majesty on the said first day of June, one thousand seven hundred and eleven, for the duties and revenues that have arisen, or shall or may arise to that time by posts, or by reason of the duties and revenues granted by either of the said former acts, shall be paid to the receiver general of the said revenue, for her Majesty’s use, and be recovered and recoverable in such manner, and by such ways and means, as the same were recoverable before the making of this present act ; any thing herein contained to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.

XXXV. And towards the establishment of a good, sure, and lasting fund, in order to raise a present supply of money for carrying on the war, and other her Majesty’s most necessary occasions ; be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the twenty ninth day of September, one thousand seven hundred and eleven, for and during the whole term of thirty two years from thence next and immediately ensuing, the full, clear, and intire weekly sum of seven hundred pounds of lawful money of Great Britain, out of all the duties and revenues from time to time, arising by virtue of this act, shall be brought and paid by the postmaster general, the receiver general of the post-office, or such other person or persons who, for the time being, shall have the receipt of the laid duties and revenues, who are hereby respectively enjoined and required to bring and pay the same accordingly, into the receipt of the Exchequer, upon Tuesday in every week, if it be not an holy-day, and if it be, then upon the next day that is not an holy-day, as one week shall successively and immediately and succeed another ; and in case in any week or weeks the whole receipt of the monies of the said duties or revenues hereby charged, as aforesaid, shall not be sufficient to answer the said weekly payment or payments hereby directed for such particular week or weeks, that then and so often the deficiency and deficiencies thereof shall be supplied and made good out of the whole receipt of the said duties or revenues arising in the next week or weeks, when the receipt or receipts shall be sufficient to bear the same ; all which payments into the Exchequer shall be made for the purposes, and under the penalties, forfeitures, and disabilities hereafter in this act expressed.

XXXVI. And it is hereby further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the postmaster general for the time being, at the head office in London, shall, from time to time, cause an account to be kept by an accountant general of all the monies arising by virtue of this act, of or for the duties or revenues aforesaid, and every or any of them, as the same shall, from time to time arise, be paid or brought into the said office, to the hands of the receiver general for the time being, who is or shall be appointed, from time to time, to receive the same ; and that such receiver general for the time being shall, out of the monies so arising, make the said weekly payments into the Exchequer, in manner, as aforesaid ; and if the said postmaster general for the time being shall refuse or neglect to appoint or keep such accountant general, or if such accountant general shall neglect to keep a just and true account, as aforesaid, or if such receiver general shall at any time refuse or neglect to make any such weekly payments, as aforesaid, into the Exchequer, according to the true meaning of this act, or if the said postmaster general, accountant general and receiver general for the time being, or any of them, or any other officer of the said duties, shall divert or misapply any of the monies which should make good the said weekly payments, or any of them, or any part thereof, contrary to the tenor and true meaning of this act, at any time or times, during the said term of thirty two years, then and in any such case they and every of them so offending shall forfeit their several offices and places, and be incapable to serve the Queen, her heirs or successors, in any office or place of trust or profit, and shall be liable, for every such offence, to pay double the value of the money so diverted or misapplied, to any person or persons who shall or may be grieved by reason of such offence, and will inform or sue for the same by action of debt, or of the case, bill, suit, or information, in any of her Majesty’s courts of record at Westminster, wherein no effoin, protection, wager of law, or more than one imparlance shall be granted or allowed.

XXXVII. And to the end the said weekly sum of seven hundred pounds may be made a fund or security for the purposes in this act expressed ; be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That there shall be provided and kept in the office of the auditor of the receipt of the Exchequer, one book, in which all the monies which shall be paid in weekly, as aforesaid, for, or upon account of the said weekly sums out of the said duties, shall be entred apart and distinct from all other monies which shall be brought and paid to the said receipt upon any other account whatsoever.

XXXVIII. Provided always, and it is hereby enacted, That the said weekly sum of seven hundred pounds for the purposes aforesaid, shall, from time to time, during all the said term of thirty two years, be paid into the Exchequer, as aforesaid, out of the whole produce of the duties and revenues arising by virtue of this act, with preference to all other payments which are, shall, or may be charged or chargeable thereupon, the necessary charges for managing the said post-office, and the duties thereof, and for receiving, answering, and accounting for the revenues arising thereby, only excepted ; and that the said duties and revenues arising by this act, ( after deduction, from time to time, to be first made of so much as shall be then due and incurred, or in arrear of or for the said weekly payments, at any me within or during the term aforesaid, and after the allowance of such necessary charges, as aforesaid, and not otherwise shall, from time to time, be subject and liable to such annuities, and other payments and incumbrances, which by any act pf parliament now in force were lawfully charged upon the revenues of the post-office, or any of them, granted by the said former acts hereby repealed, as aforesaid, or which having been charged by any grant upon the said revenues, have been saved by act of parliament, of and for such estate and estates in possession, reversion, or remainder, and subject to such conditions, limitations, restrictions, and appointments, and in such or the like manner and form, ( and not otherwise ) as the said revenues, payable by the said former acts, or any of them, would have been subject or liable if this act had not been made ; any thing herein contained to the contrary notwithstanding.

XXXIX. Provided always, and be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the first day of June, one thousand seven hundred forty and three, the same rates and prices only, and no more, shall be taken or paid for the carriage, conveyance, and delivery of all letters and packets sent by the post from one part of Great Britain to another, as also for all letters brought to Great Britain, or sent from thence, from or to any parts beyond the seas, than were authorized or allowed to be taken by the postmaster general, or his deputy or deputies, for the postage of such letters, by the said several acts hereby repealed.

XL. And whereas abuses may be committed by wilfully opening, imbeziling, detaining and delaying of letters or packets, to the great discouragement of trade, commerce, and correspondence : for prevention thereof, be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the said first day of June, one thousand seven hundred and eleven, no person or persons shall presume wittingly, willingly, or knowingly, to open, detain, or delay, or cause, procure, permit, or suffer to be opened, detained, or delayed, any letter or letters, packet or packets, after the same is or shall be delivered into the general or other post office, or into the hands of any person or persons employed for the receiving or carrying post letters, and before delivery to the persons to whom they are directed, or for their use ; except by an express warrant in writing under the hand of one of the principal secretaries of state for every such opening, detaining, or delaying ; or except in such cases where the party or parties, to whom such letter or letters, packet or packets, shall be directed, or who is or are hereby chargeable with the payment of the port or ports thereof, shall refuse or neglect to pay the same ; and except such letters or packets as shall be returned for want of true directions, and where the party, to whom the same is or are directed, cannot be found ; and that every person or persons offending in manner aforesaid, or who shall imbezil any such letter or letters, packet or packets, shall for every such offence forfeit the sum of twenty pounds ; the said penalties for any such offence Committed in England, Wales, or Berwick upon Tweed, to be recovered by action, bill, plaint, or information in any of her Majesty’s courts of record at Westminster ; and for any such offence committed in that part of Great Britain called Scotland, to be recovered in the court of sessions or Exchequer there ; such penalties respectively to be recovered by such person or persons as will inform or sue for the same, together with full costs of suit ; and over and above such penalty, as aforesaid, every such person or persons so offending, as aforesaid, shall be for ever incapable of having, using, exercising, or enjoying any office, trust, or employment in or relating to the post-office, or any branch thereof.

XLI. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no person or persons shall, after the said first day of June, one thousand seven hundred, and eleven, be capable of having, using, or exercising the office or offices of postmaster general, or any part thereof, or any other employment relating to the post office, or any branch thereof, or be any way concerned in receiving, sorting, or delivering of letters or packets, unless such person or persons shall first have taken the following oath before some one justice of the peace for the county or where such person resides, which said oath such justice of peace is hereby authorized to administer in the following words :

I A. B. do swear, That I will not wittingly, willingly, or knowingly open, detain, or delay, or cause, procure, permit, or suffer to be opened, detained, or delayed any letter or letters, packet or packets, which shall come into my hands, power, or custody, by reason of my employment in or relating to the post office ; except by the consent of the person or persons to whom the same is or shall be directed, or by an express warrant in writing under the hand of one of the principal secretaries of state for that purpose ; or except in such cases, where the party or parties to whom such letter or letters, packet or packets shall be directed, or who is or are hereby chargeable with the payment of the port or ports thereof, shall refuse or neglect to pay the same ; and except such letters or packets as shall be returned for want of true directions, or when the party or parties to whom the same is or shall be directed, cannot be found : and that I will not any way imbezil any such letter or letters, packet or packets, as aforesaid.

XLII. And it is further enacted and declared by the authority aforesaid, That from the said first day of June, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and eleven, one third part of the surplus of the yearly produce arising by the said letter or post office, or duties upon postage of letters and packets by this act granted, over and above the sum of one hundred and eleven thousand four hundred sixty one pounds, seventeen shillings and ten pence, which was the amount of the gross receipt of the duties arising by virtue of the said former acts of parliament, ( which are now repealed ) for one year ended the nine and twentieth day of September, in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and ten, and over and above the said sum of seven hundred pounds per week, shall be, and is by this act reserved to the disposal of parliament for the use of the publick, and shall not be divertible or diverted to any other use, intent, or purpose, other than according to such disposal.

XLIII. And to the intent the inheritance of such part of the said duties and revenue arising in and by the said general letter office or post office, which is hereby vested in her Majesty, her heirs and successors, undeterminable, as aforesaid, may be preserved in the crown, for the future benefit thereof ; be it further enacted and declared by the authority aforesaid, That the same, or any part thereof, shall not hereafter be alienable chargeable or grantable by her Majesty, her heirs or successors, for any estate, term, or time whatsoever, to endure longer than the life of her Majesty, or of such King or Queen as shall make such alienation, charge, or grant respectively ; and that all gifts, grants, alienations, and assurances whatsoever, to be had or made of, and charges upon the said duties or revenue, or any part thereof, contrary to the provision of this act, shall be null and void, without any inquisition, Scire facias, or other proceeding to determine or make void the same.

XLIV. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no postmaster or postmasters general, or his or their deputy or deputies, or any person employed by or under him or them, in the receiving, collecting, or managing the revenue of the post office, or any part thereof, shall, by word, message, or writing, or in any other manner whatsoever, endeavour to persuade any elector to give or disswade any elector from giving his vote for the choice of any person to be a knight of the shire, citizen, burgess, or baron of any county, city, borough, or cinque port, to serve in parliament ; and every officer or other person offending therein shall forfeit the sum of one hundred pounds ; one moiety thereof to the informer, the other moiety to the poor of the parish where such offence shall be committed, to be recovered by action of debt, bill, plaint, or information in any of her Majesty’s courts of record at Westminster, or in the court of Exchequer in Scotland, for the said offences committed in England or Scotland respectively, wherein no effoin, protection, or wager of law, or any more than one imparlance shall be allowed ; and every person convict on any such suit of thesaid offence, shall thereby become disabled and incapable of ever bearing or executing any office or place of trust whatsoever under her Majesty, her heirs or successors.
Last edited by rossi on 18 Mar 2015 22:19, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 4 George II, Cap. 33 - January 1, 1731

An Act for obviating a Doubt which hath arisen concerning the usual Allowance made upon the Delivery of Letters sent by the Penny Post to Places out of the Cities of London and Westminster and Borough of Southwark, and the respective Suburbs thereof.

WHEREAS upon the first Establishment of the Office called the Penny Post Office, the Carriage or Conveyance of the Letters by that Post was confined to the Cities of London and Westminster, the Borough of Southwark, and the respective Suburbs thereof ; and whereas upon the Application of the Inhabitants of several Towns and Places within the Compass of ten Miles round the City of London, and upon their voluntary Offer to allow and pay to the Messengers or Persons carrying or transmitting such Letters, in consideration of their being obliged to travel with an Horse to Places at that Distance, one Penny upon the Delivery of every Letter directed to any Person at any Place out of the Cities of London and Westminster, and Borough of Southwark, and the respective Suburbs thereof, over and above the Penny paid upon putting every such Letter into the Penny Post Office in London, the Carriage and Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the said Post, commonly called The Penny Post, was extended ten Miles round the City of London, and one Penny hath been constantly allowed to and taken by such Messengers, on the Delivery of every Letter directed to any Person at any Place out of the Cities of London and Westminster, the Borough of Southwork, and the respective Suburbs thereof, over and above the Penny paid upon putting such Letter into the Penny Post Office in London ; and whereas by reason of the Provisions contained in an Act of Parliament made in the ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof, for the Service of the War, and other Her Majesty’s Occasions, some Doubts have lately arisen, whether the Messengers or Persons carrying or transmitting such Letters, could lawfully receive and take the said Allowance of one Penny, upon the Delivery of every Letter, directed or delivered to or for any Person, at any Place out of the Cities of London and Westminster, the Borough of Southwark, and the respective Suburbs thereof, over and above the Penny paid upon putting such Letter into the Penny Post Office in London ; For obviating and taking away all such doubts, be it declared and enacted by the King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That nothing in the said Act of the ninth Year of Her said late Majesty’s Reign shall or ought to be construed to extend to restrain or hinder any such Messenger, or Person carrying or transmitting Letters by the said Post commonly called the Penny Post, from demanding or taking for every Letter originally sent by the Penny Post, and not first passing by the General Post and from thence transmitted by the Penny Post, which hath been or shall be delivered to or for any Person, at any Place out of the Cities of London and Westminster, the Borough of Southwark, and respective Suburbs thereof, one Penny, over and above the Penny paid upon putting every such Letter into the Penny Post Office, and that no such Messenger or other Person shall incur, or shall be deemed, adjudged or taken to have incurred, or to incur any Penalty or Forfeiture whatsoever, for demanding and taking for any such Letter so delivered or to be delivered as aforesaid, one Penny, over and above the Penny paid upon putting such Letter into the Penny Post Office, or for detaining or delaying any such Letter, until such One penny for any such Letter so delivered or to be delivered as aforesaid, was or shall be paid ; any Thing in the said Act, or in any other Law or Statute to the contrary in any wise notwithstanding.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 4 George III, Cap. 24 - January 1, 1763

An Act for preventing Frauds and Abuses in relation to the sending and receiving of Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage.

WHEREAS, under Colour of the Privilege of sending and receiving Post Letters by Members of Parliament, free from the Duty of Postage, many great and notorious Frauds have been and still are frequently practised, as well in Derogation of the Honour of Parliament, as to the Detriment of the Public Revenue ; divers Persons having presumed to counterfeit the Hand, and otherwise fraudulently to make use of the Names, of Members of Parliament, upon Letters and Packets to be sent by the Post, in order to avoid the Payment of the Duty of Postage : And whereas the Allowance of sending and receiving Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage, heretofore granted to, or customarily exercised by, certain Persons not being Members of Parliament, in respect of their Offices, has not been sufficiently confined to such Letters and Packets only as relate to the Business of their respective Offices, and may therefore, if continued without further Restrictions and Limitations, be liable to great Abuse : In order, therefore, to put the more effectual Stop to these and the like Frauds and Abuses, and at the same Time to ascertain, for the better Guidance and Direction of His Majesty’s Post Master General, and the Officers to be employed under him, in the Performance of their Duty, by what Persons only, and under what Regulations or Restrictions, the Privilege or Allowance of sending and receiving Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage shall thenceforth be enjoyed and exercised, May it please your Majesty that it may be enacted ; And be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the First Day of May one thousand seven hundred and sixty-four, so long as the Revenue arising in the General Letter Office or Post Office, or Office of Post Master General, shall continue to be carried to, and made Part of the Aggregate Fund, no Letters or Packets sent by the Post, to or from any Place whatsoever, shall be exempted from paying the Duty of Postage, according to the Rates established by the several Acts of Parliament now in Force ; other than and except such Letters and Packets as are hereinafter excepted, and in such Manner, and under such Restrictions, as are herein after declared and enacted concerning the same ; that is to say, except all such Letters and Packets as shall be sent from or to the King’s most Excellent Majesty ; all Letters and Packets, not exceeding the Weight of two Ounces, sent from and to any Places ( within the Kingdoms of Great Britain or Ireland ) during the Sitting of any Session of Parliament, or within forty Days before or forty Days after any Summons or Prorogation of the same, which shall be signed, on the Outside thereof, by any Member of either of the two Houses of Parliament of Great Britain, and whereof the whole Superscription shall be of the Hand Writing of such Member, or which shall be directed to any Member of either House of the Parliament of Great Britain, or at any of the Places of his usual Residence, or at the Place where he shall actually be at the Time of the Delivery thereof, or at the House of Parliament, or the Lobby of the House of Parliament of which he is a Member ; all Letters and Packets, not exceeding the Weight of two Ounces, sent from and to any Places within the Kingdom of Ireland, during the Sitting of any Session of Parliament of Ireland, or within forty Days before or forty Days after any Summons or Prorogation thereof, which shall be signed, on the Outside thereof, by any Member of either of the two Houses of the Parliament Ireland, and whereof the whole Superscription shall be of the Hand Writing of such Member, or which being sent, during such Time as aforesaid, from any Part of Great Britain or Ireland to any Part of Ireland, shall be directed to any Member of either House of the Parliament of Ireland, at any of the Places of his usual Residence, or at the Place where he shall actually be at the Time of the Delivery thereof, or at the House of Parliament, or the Lobby of the House of Parliament of which he is a Member ; all Letters and Packets directed to the Lord High Treasurer, or Commissioners of the Treasury, or the Secretaries to the Treasury ; to the Lord High Admiral, or Commissioners of the Admiralty, or the Secretaries of the Admiralty ; to his Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, or their Under Secretaries ; to the Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, or their Secretary ; to his Majesty’s Secretary at War, or the Deputy Secretary at War ; or to his Majesty’s Lieutenant General, or other Chief Governor or Governors of Ireland, and his or their Chief Secretary, his or their Secretary for the Provinces of Ulster and Munster in that Kingdom, his or their Secretary residing always in Great Britain, the Under Secretary and First Clerk in the Office in Ireland of the said Chief Secretary, the First Clerk in the Office in Ireland of the said Secretary for the Provinces of Ulster and Munster ; or to his Majesty’s Post Master General, or to the Deputy of the Post Master General, for that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, for the Kingdom of Ireland, or for his Majesty’s Dominions in America respectively ; or to the Secretary of such Post Master General, or Deputy of the Post Master General, or to the Farmer of the Bye and Cross Road Letters, or to any of the Surveyors of the Post Office, all for the Time being ; and all Letters and Packets sent from any of the said Officers for the Time being, which shall be signed, on the Outside thereof, by such Officer, and whereof the Whole Superscription shall likewise be of the Hand Writing of such Officer ; and also except all Letters and Packets sent from the Treasury, the Admiralty Office, the Office of his Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, the Plantation Office, the War Office, or from the General Post Office at London, or from any of the Chief Offices at Edinburgh, at Dublin, or in America, and which shall appear by an Indorsement made thereupon by some Person properly authorized as herein after mentioned to make the same, to be upon his Majesty’s Service, and shall be sealed with the Seal of the Office, or with the Seal of the Principal Officer in the Office or Department from which they are sent.

II. And, for more effectually preventing all such Frauds and Abuses as might otherwise be practised under colour of the Allowance hereby granted and continued, of sending Letters and Packets from the several Offices and Officers herein before mentioned, free from the Duty of Postage ; Be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful for the Lord Treasurer, or Commissioners of the Treasury, the Lord High Admiral, or Commissioners of the Admiralty, his Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, the Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, his Majesty’s Secretary at War, his Majesty’s Post Master General, and the Deputies of the Post Master General herein before mentioned, all for the Time being, to authorize and direct certain Persons in each of their Offices or departments respectively, a List of whose Names shall be from time to time transmitted, by the Principal Officer or Officers authorizing the same, to the General Post Office in London, to make and subscribe an Indorsement upon each Letter or Packet which shall concern the publick Business of their respective Offices, signifying that such Letter or Packet is upon His Majesty’s Service, and to seal the same with the Seal of such Office or Officer respectively ; all which Persons are hereby strictly forbid so to indorse and seal any Letter or Packet whatsoever, unless such only concerning which they shall receive the special Direction of their superior Officer, or which they shall themselves know to concern the Business of their respective Offices ; and if any Person employed in any of the said Offices, shall knowingly make and subscribe such Indorsement, or procure the same to be made upon any Letter or Packet which does not really concern the Business of the Office in respect of which he is authorized to make the same, he shall, for the first Offence, forfeit and pay the Sum of Five Pounds, to be recovered and applied in such Manner as, by the Act of the ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne for establishing a General Post Office, is directed, with respect to the Penalties inflicted by the said Act ; and for the Second Offence, shall be dismissed from his Office.

III. Provided always, That the Number of Persons so to be appointed, in each of the Offices above mentioned, to make and subscribe such Indorsement as aforesaid, shall not exceed two in any one Office or Department, except only in the Admiralty Office and the War Office ; and that the Number so to be appointed in the Admiralty Office shall not exceed eight in Time of Peace, or twelve in Time of War ; and that the Number so to be appointed in the War Office shall not exceed six in Time of Peace, or ten in Time of War.

IV. Provided also, and be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That in case any Person intitled to send Letters or Packets free of the Duty of Postage, being, by bodily Infirmity, disabled from writing the whole Superscription of such Letters or Packets, shall chuse to authorize and appoint some one Person, on his Behalf, and in his Stead, to sign his Name upon, and write the Superscription of, such Letters and Packets, and shall cause Notice thereof in Writing, under his Hand and Seal, to be transmitted to His Majesty’s Postmaster General ; all Letters and Packets, so signed and superscribed by the Person so authorized and appointed, shall be allowed to pass free of the Duty of Postage, and shall, in all respects, be proceeded with, as if the Whole Superscription had been of the Hand Writing of the Person by whom such Authority was given as aforesaid.

V. Provided always, and it is hereby further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall extend to charge with the Duty of Postage, any printed Votes, or Proceedings in Parliament, or printed News Papers, being sent without Covers, or in Covers open at the Sides, which shall be signed, on the Outside thereof, by the Hand of any Member of Parliament, in such Manner as hath heretofore practised, or which shall be directed to any Member of Parliament, at any Place whereof he shall have given Notice in Writing to the Post Master General, or to his Deputy at Edinburgh or Dublin respectively, but that all such Votes, Proceedings, and News Papers, so sent and signed directed as aforesaid, shall be received free of the Duty of Postage ; any thing in this or any former Act to the contrary notwithstanding.

VI. And forasmuch as it hath been usual for the Clerks in the Offices of his Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, and also for certain Officers in the Office of his Majesty’s Post Master General, to frank printed Votes, and Proceedings in Parliament, and printed News Papers, to be sent by the Post ; Be it therefore enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful for such Clerks and Officers as aforesaid, being thereunto licensed by his Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, or his Majesty’s Post Master General respectively, to continue to frank such printed Votes, and Proceedings in Parliament, and printed News Papers, in such Manner as they have heretofore been accustomed to frank the same ; provided that such printed Votes, Proceedings, and News Papers, shall be sent without Covers, or in Covers open at the Sides.

VII. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful for his Majesty’s Post Master General, or any of the Officers employed under him, to examine and search any Packet sent without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides, in order to discover whether any other Paper or Thing whatsoever be inclosed or concealed in or with such printed Paper, as is hereby permitted to be sent free of Postage without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides ; and in case any such other Paper or Thing whatsoever shall be found to be inclosed or concealed in or with such printed Paper as aforesaid, or in Case there shall be any Writing other than the Superscription upon such printed Paper, or upon the Cover thereof, the Whole of such Packet shall be charged with the Duty of Postage, according to the Rates established by the several Acts of Parliament now in Force for that Purpose.

VIII. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid That if any Person shall, after the First Day of June one thousand seven hundred and sixty-four, counterfeit the Hand Writing of any Person whatsoever, in the Superscription of any Letter or Packet to be sent by the Post, in order to avoid the Payment of the Duty of Postage, every Person so offending shall be deemed guilty of Felony, and shall be transported for Seven Years.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 5 George III, Cap. 25 - October 10, 1765

An act to alter certain rates of postage, and to amend, explain, and enlarge several provisions in an act made in the ninth year of the reign of Queen Anne, and in other acts relating to the revenue of the post office.
[10th October 1765]

Most gracious Sovereign,

WHEREAS the security and improvement of correspondence, throughout your Majesty’s dominions, is a matter of great concernment, and highly necessary for the preservation and extension of trade and commerce : and whereas by an act made in the ninth year of the reign of her late majesty Queen Anne, several rates are settled for the port and conveyance of letters and packets passing to and from the several parts of the British dominions in Europe and America : and whereas by the increase of trade and commerce since the passing of the said act, and by the vast accession of territory gained by the late treaty of peace, several communications are opened, and new posts have been or may be established to and from the several parts of your Majesty’s dominions in America, for which the rates of postage cannot, under the present law, be properly ascertained : and whereas the present rates of postage may in some parts be reduced, and the revenue nevertheless may hereafter be improved, by means of a more extensive circulation : we your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal subjects, the commons of Great Britain in parliament assembled, do most humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most excellent majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and commons, in this present parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, That so much of the said act made in the ninth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for establishing a general post office for all her Majesty’s dominions, and for settling a weekly sum out of the revenues thereof for the service of the war, and other her Majesty’s occasions, as establishes certain rates or sums for the port or conveyance of letters and packets passing between London and the British dominions in America, and between any places within the said dominions, shall, from and after the tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, be, and is hereby, repealed.

II. And, to the end that more easy and equal rates of postage may be settled and established, and the benefit of posts be in time extended to every part of the British dominions in America, be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the said tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five,it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s post master general for the time being, and his deputy and deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the use of his Majesty, his heirs, and successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the port and conveyance of all and every the letters, packets, and other things, that shall be carried or conveyed to or from London, from or to any of the British dominions in America, and to or from any part of the said dominions, from or to any other part thereof, according to the several and respective rates and sums hereafter mentioned ; the same being rated either by the letter, or by the ounce ; that is to say,

For all letters and packets passing from London to any port within the British dominions in America, and from any such port unto London, for every single letter one shilling ; for every double letter two shillings ; for every treble letter three shillings ; and for every ounce four shillings ; and so in proportion for every packet of deeds, writs, or other things.
For all letters and packets conveyed by sea from any port in the British dominions in America to any other port within the said dominions, for every single letter four pence ; for every double letter eight pence ; for every treble letter one shilling ; and for every ounce one shilling and four pence ; and so in proportion for every packet of deeds, writs, or other things.
For the inland conveyance of all letters and packets to or from any chief post office established, or to be established, within the British dominions in America, from or to any other part of the said dominions, not exceeding sixty British miles distant from such chief offices respectively ; or from the office where such letters or packets, not passing through any such chief office, may be put in, for every single letter four pence ; for every double letter eight pence ; for every treble letter one shilling ; and for every ounce one shilling and four pence ; and, being upwards of sixty such miles, and not exceeding one hundred such miles, for every single letter six pence ; for every double letter one shilling ; for every treble letter one shilling and six pence ; and for every ounce two shillings ; and, being upwards of one hundred such miles, and not exceeding two hundred such miles, for every single letter eight pence ; for every double letter one shilling and four pence ; for every treble letter two shillings ; and for every ounce two shillings and eight pence ; and for every distance not exceeding one hundred such miles beyond such two hundred miles, and for every such further distance, for every single letter two pence ; for every double letter four pence ; for every treble letter six pence ; and for every ounce eight pence ; and so in proportion, according to the said several and respective rates and distances, for every packet of deeds, writs, or other things.

III. And whereas by certain clauses in the said act, made in the ninth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, it is enacted, That all letters and packets that, by any master of any ship or vessel, or any of his company, or any passengers therein, should or might be brought to any port town, or which should arrive or touch at any port belonging to any port town within any her Majesty’s dominions, or any the members thereof, or which should be on board any ship or vessel which should or did touch or stay at any such port town ( other than such letters as in the said act are excepted ) should by such master, passenger, or other person or persons, be forthwith delivered unto the deputy or deputies of such post master general for the time being by him appointed for such place or port town, and to be, by such deputy or deputies, sent post unto the said general post office, to be delivered according to the several and respective directions of the same ; upon pain of forfeiting the sum of five pounds of British money for every several offence against the tenor of the said act : and whereas the said provision, in the said above recited clause, hath been found ineffectual for the purposes intended ; be it therefore further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, no ship or vessel shall be permitted to break bulk, or to make any entry in any port in the British dominions, until all letters and packets brought by any master of any such ship or vessel, or by any of his company, or any passenger on board the same, to any port in the said dominions where posts are or hereafter may be established, and from whence such letters and packets can or may be dispatched by post, shall be delivered to the deputy or deputies, or agents, of the said post master general for the time being, to be by him or them forwarded, according to their respective directions, in the same course that other letters are sent from such respective ports ; except such letters, commissions, and other matter and things, as are excepted in the said act made in the ninth year of the reign of her late majesty Queen Anne ; and also, except all such letters and packets as shall or may be brought in any ship or vessel liable to the performance of quarentine ; all which letters or packets last-mentioned shall be delivered, by the person or persons having possession thereof, to the person or persons appointed to superintend the quarentine, that all proper precautions may be by him or them taken before the delivery thereof ; and when due care has been had therein, the said letters or packets shall be by him or them dispatched, in the usual and accustomed manner, by the post ; and all masters, mariners, passengers, and other person or persons, neglecting or refusing to deliver the letters or packets brought by them as aforesaid, shall, for every such neglect or refusal respectively, forfeit the sum of twenty pounds ; to be sued for and recovered by action of debt, bill, plaint, or information, in any court of record within the kingdom, colony, plantation, or place, where the offence shall be committed ; and no essoin, privilege, protection, or wager of law, shall be admitted ; one moiety of the said penalty to his Majesty, his heirs, and successors, and the other moiety thereof to such person or persons who shall or will inform against such offender or offenders, and sue for the said penalties and forfeitures ; and for every recovery such person or persons, so informing and prosecuting for the said penalties and forfeitures, shall recover and have also taxed and paid their full costs of suit ; any thing in the said act, made in the ninth year of the reign of her majesty Queen Anne, to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.

IV. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the said deputy or deputies to demand, have, receive, and take, for every such letter and packet so delivered from any ship or vessel, other than packet boats, to such deputy or deputies at the ports in his Majesty’s dominions, as shall be directed to any place within the town belonging to such port, or within the limits of the delivery of letters and packets by such deputy and deputies, the rate or sum of one penny, over and above what may now be received for the same.

V. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, the rates now payable for the postage of letters and packets, sent or conveyed by the general post, not exceeding one post stage in Great Britain and Ireland, and not exceeding two post stages in that part of Great Britain called England, do cease and determine ; and that from and after the said tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, it shall and may be lawful to and for the said post master general, and his deputy and deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the use of his Majesty, his heirs and successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the port and conveyance of all such letters and packets which he shall convey, carry, or send post, within the kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, according to the several rates and sums hereafter-mentioned ( the same being rated either by the letter or by the ounce ) that is to say,

For the port or conveyance of every single letter, so conveyed or carried by the post as aforesaid, not exceeding one whole post stage from the office where such letter may be put in, within the kingdoms aforesaid, the sum of one penny ; for every double letter two pence ; for every treble letter three pence ; and for every ounce four pence ; and so in proportion for every packet of deeds, writs, or other things.
And for the port and conveyance of every single letter, so conveyed or carried by the post as aforesaid ; above one post stage, and not exceeding two post stages, from the office where such letter may be put in, within that part of Great Britain called England, the sum of two pence ; for every double letter four pence ; for every treble letter six pence ; and for every ounce eight pence ; and so in proportion for every packet or deeds, writs, or other things.

VI. Provided always, and be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That nothing herein before contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to alter, or in any wise to affect, the rates or sums to be paid for letters or packets or repassing by the carriage called The Penny Post.

VII. And whereas, for the more ready and extensive conveyance of letters and packets between that part of Great Britain called England, and Ireland, and for the conveniency of trade and commerce between the said kingdoms, it may be convenient and expedient to improve the communication for the conveyance of such letters and packets by the post through Carlisle, Dumfries, and Port Patrick, or some other convenient port in Scotland ; and through Donaghadee, or some other convenient port in Ireland ; be it further declared and enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the said post master general, and his deputy or deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the port and conveyance of all letters and packets, passing and repassing by the post between England and Ireland, through Carlisle, Dumfries, Port Patrick, and Donaghadee, or other convenient ports in Scotland and Ireland, the same rates or sums for English postage, according to the number of miles or stages such letters and packets are carried by the post in England, as also the fame rates or sums for Scotch postage, according to the number of miles or stages such letters and packets are carried by the post in Scotland, and moreover the same rates or sums for packet postage between Port Patrick and Donaghadee, or other convenient ports in Scotland and Ireland, as likewise the same rates or sums for Irish postage, according to the number of miles or stages such letters are carried by the post in Ireland, as are respectively settled, established, and ascertained, by the said act made in the ninth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, or by this present act.

VIII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That so much of the said act, made in the ninth year of the reign of her late majesty Queen Anne, as directs, that the rates or sums to be paid for the conveyance of letters, to be sent by packet boats, between Port Patrick and Donaghadee, shall be paid at the place where such letter or letters are delivered, in order to be sent by such packet boats, shall, from and after the said tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, be, and is hereby, repealed.

IX. And, to the end that all letters or packets may be charged with postage, according to the rated distance they are respectively carried by the post, and for preventing all disputes touching the same, be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for such person and persons as the post master general for the time being shall appoint, to measure, or cause to be measured, by the wheel, all the post roads which are now settled and established, or which shall hereafter be settled and established, in any part of the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, and other the British dominions.

X. Provided always, That such person or persons, who shall be so appointed as aforesaid to measure the said distances, and every of them, shall be sworn to perform the same according to the best of their skill and judgement ; which oath shall and may be administered by any justice of the peace, who is hereby authorized and required to administer the same, and to make certificates thereof in writing, to be entered, without fee or charge, in the three chief post offices in Great Britain and Ireland ; and the chief post offices established, or to be established, in America ; and moreover, that such person or persons so to be appointed by such post master as aforesaid, shall, and they are hereby required to cause fair surveys or books to be made out ; one of each whereof shall be left with his Majesty’s post master general in London, another of each to be left at the chief post office in Edinburgh with the post master general’s deputy there, another of each to be left at the chief post office at Dublin with the post master general’s deputy there, and another of each of such surveys or books shall be left at each of the chief post offices established, or to be established, in America, with the respective deputies of the post master general there, to remain in the said post offices ; each of which said surveys or books shall be signed by the person or persons making the same, who shall and are hereby respectively required to make oath of the truth of such surveys ; which oath or oaths shall and may be administered by any justice of the peace, who is hereby authorized and required to administer the same ; and a certificate of his or their having sworn to the truth thereof hall be signed by the post master general for the time being, or by his deputy or deputies, in such chief post offices in Great Britain and Ireland, and in the British dominions in America ; which books and surveys shall determine the distances on all the said post roads : and in case of any suspicion of error or wrong admeasurement, it shall and may be lawful for the said post master general to cause new surveys to be made ; and the last surveys which shall be made, and shall be verified and attested as above directed, shall in all courts of justice, be evidence of the distances on such post roads ; and all rates granted by any former act or acts, or by this present act, for the port or conveyance of letters and packets, shall be paid and taken according to such surveys.

XI. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the post master general for the time being, and his deputy and deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to settle and establish an office, to be called The Penny Post Office, in any city or town, and the suburbs thereof, and places adjacent, within the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, and the British dominions in America, where such post shall, by the post master general, be adjudged necessary and convenient ; and to demand, have, receive, and take, the same rates and sums for the postage and conveyance of all letters and packets, conveyed by such penny post, as are or may be taken for the carriage of letters and packets, sent or conveyed by the carriage called The Penny Post, established and settled within the cities of London and Westminster, and borough of Southwark, and parts adjacent, according to the extent and meaning of the said act made in the ninth year of her said late majesty Queen Anne, and of an act made in the fourth year of his late majesty King George the Second, and of this present act.

XII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That when such penny post office or offices shall be settled and established in such cities, towns, suburbs, or places adjacent, within the kingdoms of Great Britain and Ireland, and the British dominions in America, as aforesaid, no person or persons whatsoever shall make any collection of letters or packets in or near such city, town, suburbs, or places, where such penny post office or offices shall be established, without licence or leave of the post master general for the time being ; upon pain of incurring the forfeitures and penalties to be forfeited and paid by persons collecting, receiving, carrying, recarrying and delivering letters, contrary to the said act made in the ninth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, to be recovered in manner as by the said act is directed, and with full costs of suit.

XIII. And be it further enacted and declared by the authority aforesaid, That all letters and packets whatsoever, which shall or may be brought, by the inland or foreign post, to the general post office in London, directed to any person or persons at any place or places beyond the delivery of the inland or foreign departments of the general post office respectively, and within the delivery of the said office called The Penny Post Office, shall be conveyed and delivered by the said penny post office ; and that it shall and may be lawful for any messenger or person, carrying or transmitting such letters or packets, to demand and take for the carriage and delivery of the same, one penny, and no more, over and above the rates of postage which shall have become due, for the port or conveyance of such letters or packets to the general post office.

XIV. And whereas the weight of letters and packets, sent or conveyed by the carriage called The Penny Post, hath not yet been ascertained by any law or statute : and whereas many heavy and bulky packets and parcels are now sent and conveyed by such carriage, which by their bulk and weight, greatly retard the speedy delivery thereof ; be it thereof enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the fifth day of July, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, no letter, packet, or parcel whatsoever, shall be forwarded, sent, or conveyed, by any carriage called The Penny Post already established, or hereafter to be established, if the weight of such letter, packet, or parcel, shall exceed the weight of four ounces, other than such letters or packets as have first come by the post to the general post office, or shall be passing by the said carriage called The Penny Post, into the said general post office.

XV. And whereas by the said act, made in the ninth year the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, certain rates established for all letters passing from London through the Spanish Netherlands, or the United Provinces, to Hamburgh ( post-paid to Antwerp or Amsterdam ) and from Hamburgh through the Netherlands, or the United Provinces, unto London ; be it enacted, That so much of the said act, made in the ninth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, as establishes the rates last above mentioned, shall, from and after the fifth day of July, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, be, and the same is hereby repealed ; and the said rates shall from thenceforth cease and determine : and from and after the said fifth day of July, it shall and may be lawful to and for the said post master general, and his deputy or deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the use of his Majesty, his heirs, and successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the port and conveyance of all letters and packets, sent or conveyed by the post from London to Hamburgh, or from Hamburgh to London, the same rates or sums of money which, by the said made in the said ninth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, are settled, and appointed to be taken for all letters and packets passing by the post from London to all other parts of Germany.

XVI. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the said post master general, and his deputy and deputies, if such post master general shall deem it necessary and expedient, to cause the rates or sums for the postage of all letters and packets which are to be sent by the post out of the kingdom of Great Britain, to be paid upon their being put into any post office within the said kingdom.

XVII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if any deputy, clerk, agent, letter carrier, or other officer whatsoever, appointed, or to be hereafter appointed and employed in the business of the post office, shall, from and after tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, secrete, embezzle, or destroy, any letter, packet, bag, or mail of letters, which he, she, or they, shall and may be respectively entrusted with, or which shall have come to his, her, or their hands or possession, by virtue of their respective employments in the said post office, containing any bank note, bank post bill, bill of exchange, exchequer bill, South Sea or East India bond, dividend warrant of the bank, South Sea, East India, or any other company, society, or corporation, navy or victualling bill, seaman’s ticket, state lottery ticket, goldsmith’s note for the payment of money, or other bond or warrant, bill, or promissory note for the payment of money, or American provincial bill of credit ; or shall steal and take, out of any letter or packet that shall come to his, her, or their hands of possession, by virtue of their respective employments, any such bank note, bank post, bill, bill of exchange, exchequer bill, South Sea or East India bond, dividend warrant of the bank, South Sea, East India, or any other company, society, or corporation, navy or victualling bill, seaman’s ticket, state lottery ticket, goldsmith’s note for the payment of money, or other bond or warrant, or promissory note for the payment of money, or American provincial bill of credit, with intent to secrete, embezzle, or destroy the same ; every such offender or offenders, being thereof convicted in due form of law, shall be deemed guilty of felony, and shall suffer death as a felon.

XVIII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the said tenth day of October, one thousand seven hundred and sixty five, if any person or persons whatsoever shall rob any of his Majesty’s mails of any letter or letters, packet or packets, bag or mail of letters, although such robbery shall not appear, or be proved, to be a taking from the person, or upon the King’s highway, or to be a robbery committed in any dwelling-house, or any coach-house, stable, barn, or any outhouse belonging to a dwelling-house, and although it should not appear that any person or persons were put in fear by filch robbery, yet such offender or offenders, being thereof convicted as aforesaid, shall nevertheless respectively be deemed guilty of felony, and shall suffer death as a felon.

XIX. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That is any deputy, clerk, agent, letter carrier, or other servant, appointed, authorized, and intrusted, to take in letters or packets, and receive the postage thereof, shall, after the said tenth day of October, imbezzle, or apply to his, her, or their own use, any money or monies by him, her, or them, received with such letters or packets, for the postage thereof ; or shall burn or otherwise destroy any letter or letters, packet or packets, by him, her, or them, so taken in or received ; or who, by virtue of their respective offices, shall advance the rates upon letters or packets sent by the post, and shall not duly account for the money by him, her, or them, received for such advanced postage ; every such offender or offenders, being thereof convicted as aforesaid, shall be deemed guilty of felony.

XX. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That if any post boy or rider, having taken any of his Majesty’s mails, or bags of letters or packets, under his care, in order to convey the same to the next post town or stage, shall, after the said tenth day of October, quit or desert the same before his arrival at such post town or stage, or shall suffer any other person or persons ( the person or persons employed to guard such mail or bags of letters and packets only excepted ) to ride on the horse or carriage along with the said mails or bags of letters and packets ; or shall loiter on the road, and wilfully mispend his time, so as to retard the arrival of the said mails or bags of letters at the next post town or stage ; or shall not, in all possible cafes, convey such mails or bags of letters after the rate of six English miles an hour at the least ; every such offender, for every such offence, being thereof convicted, either by voluntary confession of the party, or by the oath or oaths of one or more credible witness or witnesses, before any one or more justice or justices of the peace ( which oath and oaths the said justice or justices is and are hereby respectively impowered and required to administer ) shall be sent to the house of correction, and confined to hard labour for any time not exceeding one month, nor less than fourteen days.

XXI. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the said tenth day of October, if any post boy or post boys, rider or riders, shall, by himself or themselves, or in combination with others, unlawfully collect or receive letters or packets, or convey, or cause letters and packets to be unlawfully conveyed, and shall thereof be convicted, either by the voluntary confession of the party, or by the oath of one or more credible witness or witnesses, before any one or more justice or justices of the peace ( which oath and oaths the said justice and justices is and are hereby respectively impowered and required to administer ) every such offender or offenders shall for every letter or packet so by him or them unlawfully collected, conveyed, or delivered, forfeit the sum of ten shillings, to be paid to the informer ; and if the fame shall not be forthwith paid upon conviction, it shall and may be lawful for such justice and justices to commit such offender or offenders to the house of correction, there to remain at hard labour for any space exceeding two months, nor less than one month.

XXII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all and every the clauses, provisoes, powers, privileges, advantages, disabilities, penalties, forfeitures, and methods for the recovery of the same matters and things, contained in the said act made in the ninth year of the reign of her said late majesty Queen Anne, or in any other act or acts whatsoever, touching the general post office, or the carriage called The Penny Post Office, and not herein and hereby expresly altered or repealed, shall be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend, to this present act, as fully and effectually, to all intents and purposes, as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in the body of this present act.

XXIII. And be it further enacted and declared, That all rates or sums of money established or appointed by this act, and also all sums of money imposed as forfeitures or penalties, and all sums of money required to be paid, and all other monies herein mentioned, shall be deemed and taken to be sterling money of Great Britain, and shall be collected, taken, recovered, and paid, to the amount of the value which such nominal sums bear in Great Britain.

XXIV. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all the monies arising by the rates aforesaid, except the monies which shall be necessary to defray such expences as shall be incurred in the collection and management of the same, all other expences attending the said office, and the due execution of the acts relating thereto, shall be appropriated and applied to such and the same uses, to which the present rates of postage are respectively now by law appropriated and made applicable.

XXV. Provided always and be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all charges, out-goings, and disbursements, necessary for the receipt and management of the said rates, and the rates granted by former acts, and all other expences attending the said office, and the due execution of the several acts relating thereto, be allowed and paid, in like manner as the same have heretofore been allowed, authorized, and paid, at any time since the commencement of the rates granted by the said act made in the ninth year of the reign of Queen Anne ; any thing in this act, or in an act passed in the first year of his Majesty’s reign, intituled An act for the support of his Majesty’s houshold, and of the honour and dignity of the crown of Great Britain, to the contrary notwithstanding.

XXVI. And whereas by an act made in the fourth year of the reign of his present Majesty, intituled An act for preventing frauds and abuses, in relation to the sending and receiving of letters and packets free from the duty of postage, it is enacted, That from and after the first day of May, one thousand seven hundred and sixty four, so long as the revenue arising in the general letter office or post office, or office of post master general, shall continue to be made part of the aggregate fund, no letters or packets sent by the post, to or from any place whatsoever, shall be exempted from paying the duty of postage, except such letters and packets as are therein particularly excepted : and whereas the privilege of sending and receiving letters and packets, free from the duty of postage, is not by the said act extended to the pay master general of his Majesty’s forces for the time being, or to the clerk of the parliaments, or to the clerk of the house of commons of Great Britain, for the time being, who, by virtue of their respective offices and employments, necessarily send and receive many letters relating to the publick concerns of these kingdoms ; be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, That from and after the passing of this act, the said pay master general of his Majesty’s forces for the time being, shall and may send and receive letters, free from the duty of postage, in the same manner, and under such restrictions, as other officers mentioned in the said act are thereby permitted, in respect of their offices, to send and receive ; and that the said clerk of the parliaments, and clerk of the house of commons of Great Britain, for the time being, shall and may respectively, from and after the passing of this act, send and receive letters, free from the duty of postage, in the same manner, and under such restrictions, as any member of either of the two houses of parliament of Great Britain now send and receive the same, in pursuance of the said act.

XXVII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That is any action or suit shall be commenced against person or persons for any thing done in pursuance of this act, the same shall be commenced within six months after the fact committed, and not afterwards ; and the defendant or defendants in such action or suit shall and may plead the general issue, and give this act, and the special matter, in evidence ; and the same was done in pursuance, and by the authority of this act : and if it shall appear so to be done, or that such action or suit shall be commenced after the time before limited for bringing the same, that then the jury shall find for the defendant or defendants ; and upon a verdict for the defendant, or if the plaintiff or plaintiffs shall be nonsuited, or discontinue his, her, or their action or suit, after the defendant or defendants shall have appeared ; or if, upon demurrer, judgment shall be given against the plaintiff or plaintiffs, the defendant or defendants shall and may recover treble costs, and have the like remedy for the same, as any defendant or defendants hath or have in any other cases by law.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

Post by rossi »

Act, 7 George III, Cap. 50 - January 1, 1767

An Act for amending certain Laws relating to the Revenue of the Post Office ; and for granting Rates of Postage for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets between Great Britain and the Isle of Man, and within that Island.

WHEREAS it is of the utmost Importance to the Trade and Commerce of these Kingdoms, that all Letters, Packets, Bank Notes, Bills of Exchange and other Things, may be sent and conveyed by the Post with the greatest Safety and Security ; and it having been found necessary, that some further Regulations and Provisions should be made for that Purpose : May it please Your Majesty, that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That if any Deputy, Clerk, Agent, Letter Carrier, Post Boy or Rider, or any other Officer or Person whatsoever, employed, or to be hereafter employed, in receiving, stamping, sorting, charging, carrying, conveying or delivering, Letters or Packets, or in any other Business relating to the Post Office, shall, from and after the first Day of November one thousand seven hundred and sixty seven, secrete, embezzle or destroy, any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets, Bag or Mail of Letters, which he, she or they, shall and may be respectively intrusted with, or which shall have come to his, her or their Hands or Possession, containing any Bank Note, Bank Post Bill, Bill of Exchange, Exchequer Bill, South Sea or East India Bond, Dividend Warrant of the Bank, South Sea, East India, or any other Company, Society or Corporation, Navy or Victualling or Transport Bill, Ordnance Debenture, Seaman’s Ticket, State Lottery Ticket or Certificate, Bank Receipt for Payment on any Loan, Note of Assignment of Stock in the Funds, Letter of Attorney for receiving Annuities or Dividends, or for selling Stock in the Funds, or belonging to any Company, Society or Corporation, American Provincial Bill of Credit, Goldsmith’s or Banker’s Letter of Credit or Note for or relating to the Payment of Money, or other Bond or Warrant, Draught, Bill or Promissory Note whatsoever, for the Payment of Money ; or shall steal and take out of any Letter or Packet that shall come to his, her or their Hands or Possession, any such Bank Note, Bank Post Bill, Bill of Exchange, Exchequer Bill, South Sea or East India Bond, Dividend, Warrant of the Bank, South Sea, East India, or any other Company, Society or Corporation, Navy or Victualling or Transport Bill, Ordnance Debenture, Seaman’s Ticket, State Lottery Ticket or Certificate, Bank Receipt for Payment on any Loan, Note of Assignment of Stock in the Funds, Letter of Attorney for receiving Annuities or Dividends, or for selling Stock in the Funds, or belonging to any Company, Society or Corporation, American Provincial Bill of Credit, Goldsmith’s or Banker’s Letter of Credit or Note for or relating to the Payment of Money, or other Bond or Warrant, Draught, Bill or Promissory Note whatsoever, for the Payment of Money ; every such Offender or Offenders, being thereof convicted in due Form of Law, shall be deemed guilty of Felony, and shall suffer Death as a Felon without Benefit of Clergy.

II. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That, from and after the said first Day of November one thousand seven hundred and sixty seven, if any Person or Persons whatsoever shall rob any Mail or Mails, in which Letters are sent or conveyed by the Post, of any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets, Bag or Mail of Letters ; or shall steal and take from or out of any such Mail or Mails, or from or out of any Bag or Bags of Letters, sent or conveyed by the Post, or from or out of any Post Office, or House or Place for the Receipt or Delivery of Letters or Packets sent or to be sent by the Post, any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets ; although such Robbery, Stealing or Taking, shall not appear, or be proved to be a Taking from the Person, or upon the King’s Highway, or to be a Robbery committed in any Dwelling-house, or any Coach-house, Stable, Barn or any Out-house belonging to a Dwelling-house ; and although it should not appear that any Person or Persons were put in Fear by such Robbery, Stealing or Taking ; yet such Offender or Offenders, being thereof convicted as aforesaid, shall nevertheless respectively be deemed guilty of Felony, and shall suffer Death as a Felon, without Benefit of Clergy.

III. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That if any Deputy, Clerk, Agent, Letter Carrier, Officer or other Person whatsoever, employed or hereafter to be employed in any Business relating to the Post Office, shall take and receive into his, her or their Hands or Possession any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets, to be forwarded by the Post, and receive any Sum or Sums of Money therewith for the Postage thereof, shall, after the said first Day of November one thousand seven hundred and sixty seven, burn or otherwise destroy any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets, by him, her or them, so taken in or received ; or if any such Deputy, Clerk, Agent, Letter Carrier, Officer or other Person whatsoever, so employed, or hereafter to be so employed, shall advance the Rate or Rates of Postage upon any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets, sent by the Post, and shall secrete, and not duly account for the Money by him, her or them received for such advanced Postage ; every such Offender or Offenders, being thereof convicted as aforesaid, shall be deemed guilty of Felony.

IV. And whereas it hath been found necessary, for the Convenience and Improvement of Trade and Commerce, and for the more safe and speedy Conveyance of Letters and Packets between Great Britain and the Isle of Man, to establish a Packet Boat between the Port of Whitehaven in the County of Cumberland, and the Port of Douglas in the said Isle of Man ; Be it enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That, from and after the fifth Day of July one thousand seven hundred and sixty seven, it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the Post and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats to or from the Port of Whitehaven aforesaid, or any other convenient Port in the Kingdom of Great Britain, from or to the Port of Douglas aforesaid, or any other convenient Port in the said Isle of Man ( over and above all other Rates payable for such Letters or Packets ) according to the Rates and Sums hereafter mentioned ( the same being rated either by the Letter, or by the Ounce ) that is to say,

For every Single Letter, two Pence.
For every Double Letter, four Pence.
For every Treble Letter, six Pence.
And for every Ounce, eight Pence.

And so in Proportion for every Packet of Deeds, Writs and other Things.

V. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That, from and after the said fifth Day of July one thousand seven hundred and sixty seven, it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General to establish Post Offices and Post Roads within the said Isle of Man, wherever it shall appear to him to be necessary and convenient for the Benefit of Trade and Correspondence so to do ; and that it shall and may be lawful for such Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the Inland Port or Conveyance of all Letters and Packets sent or conveyed by the Post within the said Isle, such Rates of Postage, in Proportion to the Number of Miles or Stages such Letters and Packets are carried or convoyed by the Post, as now are respectively settled, established and ascertained to be paid for the Inland Port or Conveyance of Letters and Packets within that Part of Great Britain called England.

VI. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That, from and after the said firth Day of July one thousand seven hundred and sixty seven, all and every the Clauses, Provisions, Powers, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties and Methods for the Recovery of the same, and all other Matters and Things contained in an Act made in the ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a Weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of the War, and other Her Majesty’s Occasions, ( and not repealed or altered by any subsequent Law ) ; as also an Act made in the sixth Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George the First, intituled, An Act for preventing Frauds and Abuses in the Publick Revenues of Excise, Customs, Stamp Duties, Post Office and House Money, so far as the said Act relates to the Post Office ; as also in an Act made in the twenty sixth Year of the Reign of His Majesty King George, the Second, intituled, An Act for the more effectual preventing the fraudulent Removal of Tobacco by Land or Water, and for the Ease of the fair Trader ; and for ascertaining the Rates payable for the Postage of certain Letters ; and for amending and explaining the Laws relating to the Sale of Spirituous Liquors by Retail, so far as the said Act relates to the Post Office ; as also in an Act made in the fourth Year of the Reign of His present Most Gracious Majesty, intituled, An Act for preventing Frauds and Abuses in relation to the sending and receiving Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage ; as also in an Act made in the fifth Year of His present Majesty, intituled, An Act to alter certain Rates of Postage ; and to amend, explain and enlarge several Provisions in an Act made in the ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, and in other Acts relating to the Revenue of the Post Office ; and also in this present Act, or in any other Acts relating to the Post Office, shall extend, and be deemed and construed to extend to the said Isle of Man, and to all His Majesty’s Subjects within the said Isle, as fully and effectually, in every respect, as if the said Isle, and His Majesty’s Subjects therein, had been expressly included in the said several Acts, or in any of them.

VII. And be it enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That all the Monies arising by the Rates aforesaid, except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Collection and Management of the same, and all other Expences attending the said Office, and the due Execution of the Acts relating thereto, shall be appropriated and applied to such and the same Uses so to which the present Rates of Postage are respectively now by Law appropriated and made applicable.

VIII. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That if any Action or Suit shall be commenced against any Person or Persons for any thing done in pursuance of this Act, the same shall be commenced within six Months after the Fact committed, and not afterwards ; and the Defendant or Defendants in such Action or Suit shall and may plead the General Issue, and give this Act, and the Special Matter, in Evidence, and that the same was done in pursuance and by the Authority of this Act ; and if it shall appear so to be done, or that such Action or Suit shall be commenced after the time before limited for bringing the same, that then the Jury shall find for the Defendant or Defendants ; and upon a Verdict for the Defendant, or if the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs, shall be nonsuited, or discontinue his, her or their Action or Suit after the Defendant or Defendants shall have appeared ; or if, upon Demurrer, Judgment shall be given against the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs, the Defendant or Defendants shall and may recover Treble Colts, and have the like Remedy for the same as any Defendant or Defendants hath or have in any other cases by Law.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

Post by rossi »

Act, 24 George III, Cap. 37 - May 18, 1784

An Act for granting to his Majesty certain additional Rates of Postage for Conveyance of Letters and Packets, by the Post, within the Kingdom of Great Britain ; for preventing Frauds in the Revenue, carried on by the Conveyance of certain Goods in Letters and Packets ; and for further preventing Frauds and Abuses in relation to the sending and receiving of Letters and Packets free from Postage.

Most Gracious Sovereign,
WE, your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, towards raising, by the most easy Means, the necessary Supplies to defray your Majesty’s publick Expences, have freely and voluntarily resolved to give and grant unto your Majesty the additional Rates and Duties herein-after mentioned ; and do most humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That, from and after the thirty-first Day of August, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-four, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorised, to and for the Use of his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all such Letters and Packets which he shall convey, carry, or send Post within the Kingdom of Great Britain, according to the several Rates and Sums hereafter mentioned, the same being rated by the Letter or by the Ounce, in Addition to all other Rates and Duties, now payable for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the Post within the said Kingdom, by any Act or Acts of Parliament now in Force ; that is to say,

For the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, so conveyed or carried by the Post as aforesaid, not exceeding one whole Post Stage from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within the said Kingdom of Great Britain, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Deeds, Writs, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above one Post Stage, and not exceeding two Post Stages, from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called England, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above two Post Stages, and not exceeding Eighty English Miles, distant from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called England, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above eighty English Miles, and not exceeding one hundred and fifty English Miles distant from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called England, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above one hundred and fifty English Miles distant from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called England, the Sum of two Pence :
For every double Letter, four Pence :
For every treble Letter, Sixpence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, eight Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port or Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post from the General Post Office in the City of London unto the City of Edinburgh, in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, or from thence to the said General Post Office in the said City of London, and to and from Dumfries and Cockburnspeth, and between either of those Places and the said City of Edinburgh, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above one Post Stage, and not exceeding fifty English Miles, distant from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above fifty English Miles, and not exceeding eighty English Miles, distant from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above eighty English Miles, and not exceeding one hundred and fifty English Miles, distant from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland, the Sum of one Penny :
For every double Letter, two Pence :
For every treble Letter, three Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter, conveyed or carried by the Post above one hundred and fifty English Miles distant from the Office where such Letter may be put in, within that Part of the said Kingdom of Great Britain called Scotland, the Sum of two Pence :
For every double Letter, four Pence :
For every treble Letter, six Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, eight Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of Writs, Deeds, or other Things.

II. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That no Letter or Packet ( not passing through London ) to or from Glasgow, or the intermediate Places by the Way of Carlisle, shall pay an higher Rate of Postage than if the same had passed through Edinburgh, to or from Glasgow ; and that no Letter or Packet, passing to or from Edinburgh, or any intermediate Places in England and Scotland, North of London, shall be subject to an higher Rate of Postage than seven Pence for a single Letter, and so in Proportion.

III. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That no Letter or Packet, together with the Contents thereof, shall be taxed or rated at an higher Rate of Postage, according to the Rates and Duties granted by any former Act or Acts of Parliament, or by this present Act, than as a treble Letter, unless the same shall be one Ounce in Weight ; and that all Letters and Packets of the Weight of one Ounce shall be rated as four single Letters, and so in Proportion for every Quarter of an Ounce above the Weight of one Ounce, reckoning each Quarter of an Ounce as a single Letter.

IV. And for the Prevention of Frauds on the Revenue, by the Importation into this Kingdom, in Letters or Packets sent by the Post, of Goods which are prohibited to be imported, or on the Importation of which a Duty is payable ; be it further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act, whenever any foreign Letter or Packet, containing any Inclosure, shall be received at any of the Offices of the General Post Office, it shall and may be lawful for any of the Officers employed in the said Office to carry such Letter or Packet to any Justice of Peace, or other Magistrate for the Town, District, or County, in which such Office shall be situate, and to make Oath before such Magistrate, that he suspects the same to contain Goods which are prohibited to be imported, or on the Importation of which a Duty is payable ; and it shall then be lawful for him, in the Presence of the said Magistrate, to cut with a Penknife in and through the Folds of the said Letter or Packet, and its Inclosure or Inclosures, one Opening or Slit not exceeding two Inches in Length ; and if it shall then appear to the said Magistrate that any such Goods as aforesaid are contained therein, he shall proceed forthwith to open the said Letter or Packet, and shall immediately, in Presence of the said Officer, destroy such Goods ; and in such Case, the Magistrate shall inclose such Letter or Packet in a Cover, in which shall be written an Attestation signed by him, containing the Name of the Officer by whom such Letter or Packet shall have been brought to him, the Time of its being so brought, and the Quantity and Description of the Goods found therein, and attesting that the same were then by him destroyed, and shall deliver the said Letter or Packet so inclosed, and also sealed by him, to the said Officer, to be by him forwarded to the Commissioners of his Majesty’s Customs, who shall, on the Receipt thereof, cause to be paid to the said Officer any Sum not exceeding five Pounds, nor less than ten Shillings.

V. And be it further enacted, That if, on making such Opening as aforesaid in such Letter or Packet, no such Goods shall be found therein, the said Magistrate shall then inclose the same in a Cover, with an Attestation signed by him, that the Opening in such Letter or Packet was made in his Presence, and shall deliver the same, sealed up, to the said Officer, to be transmitted by the ordinary Course of the Post to the Person or Persons to whom such Letter or Packet shall have been directed when it was received at the Post Office : Provided always, That no additional Postage shall be charged on any such Letter or Packet in consequence of these Proceedings, nor shall any Letter or Packet be detained thereby beyond the due and regular Course of the Post, except in Cases of the most urgent Necessity.

VI. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein-before contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to alter, or in anywise to affect the Rates or Sums to be paid for Letters or Packets passing by the Carriage called The Penny Post.

VII. And whereas, notwithstanding the several Provisions made in an Act passed in the fourth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, intituled, An Act for preventing Frauds and Abuses in relation to the sending and receiving of Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage, divers Persons have presumed to counterfeit the Hand-writing, and otherwise fraudulently to make use of the Names of Members of Parliament in the Superscription of Letters and Packets sent by the Post, with Intent to avoid Payment of the Duty of Postage ; in order therefore to put the more effectual Stop to these Frauds and Abuses, be it further enacted, That, from and after the End of this present Session of Parliament, so long as the Revenue arising in the General Letter Office, or Post Office, or Office of Postmaster General shall continue to be carried to, and made Part of, the Aggregate Fund, no Letter or Packet, sent by the Post from any Place whatsoever within the Kingdom of Great Britain, directed by any Member of either the two Houses of Parliament of Great Britain, shall be exempted from paying the Duty of Postage according to the Rates established by the several Acts of Parliament now in Force, and by this present Act, unless the whole Superscription upon every Letter or Packet so sent shall be of the Hand-writing of the Member directing the same, and shall have indorsed thereon the Name of such Member, together with the Name of the Post Town from which the same is intended to be sent, and the Day, Month, and Year, when the same shall be to be put into the Post Office, the Day of the Month to be in Words at Length, and the Whole to be of the Hand-writing of the Member ; and also unless every such Letter or Packet shall be put into the General Post Office, or other Post Office, or into any receiving House or Place appointed by his Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Receipt of Letters and Packets to be forwarded by the Post, on the Day of the Date put upon such Letter or Packet ; and no Letters or Packets directed to any Member of either of the Two Houses of Parliament of Great Britain shall be exempted from paying the Duty of Postage, unless such Letters and Packets as shall, during the Sitting of any Session of Parliament, or within forty Days before, or forty Days after any Summons or Prorogation of the same, be directed to any such Member at the Place where he shall actually be at the Time of the Delivery thereof, or at his usual Place of Residence in London, or at the House of Parliament, or the Lobby of the House of Parliament, of which he is a Member.

VIII. And be it enacted, That the several Persons who, by virtue of any Act or Acts of Parliament, are authorised in Right of their respective Offices and Employments, to send and receive Letters free from the Duty of Postage, and their Successors in such Offices and Employments, shall and may, during their Continuance in such Offices and Employments, respectively send and receive Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage, in the same Manner, and under such Restrictions, as any Member of either House of Parliament may send and receive the same in pursuance of this Act ; and shall and may respectively send and receive Votes, Proceedings in Parliament, and printed Newspapers, free from the Duty of Postage, in such and the like Manner as any Member of either House of Parliament may send and receive the same : Provided always, That nothing herein contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to the Delivery of Letters or Packets sent or conveyed by the Carriage called The Penny Post.

IX. And be it further enacted, That if any Person whatsoever shall, from and after the End of this present Session of Parliament, forge or counterfeit the Hand-writing of any Person whatsoever, in the Superscription of any Letter or Packet to be sent by the Post, in order to avoid the Payment of the Duty of Postage, or shall forge, counterfeit, or alter, or shall procure to be forged, counterfeited, or altered, the Date upon the Superscription of any such Letter or Packet, or shall write and send by the Post, or cause to be written and sent by the Post, any Letter or Packet, the Superscription or Cover whereof shall be forged or counterfeited, or the Date upon such Superscription or Cover altered, in order to avoid the Payment of the Duty of Postage, knowing the same to be forged, counterfeited, or altered ; every Person so offending, and being thereof convicted in due Form of Law, shall be deemed guilty Felony, and shall be transported for seven Years.

X. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates and Duties herein-before granted shall be paid, from Time to Time, into the Hands of the Receiver General for the Time being of the Post Office, who shall pay out of such Rates and Duties ( the necessary Charges of collecting, paying and accounting for the same being first deducted ) the full, clear, and intire weekly Sum of two thousand three Pounds, of lawful Money of Great Britain, into the Receipt of the Exchequer, for the Purposes in Act mentioned, upon Tuesday in every Week, if it be not an Holiday, and if it be, then upon the next Day that is not an Holiday, as one Week shall successively and immediately follow and succeed another ; the first of the said weekly Payments to begin and be made on Tuesday the thirtieth Day of November, thousand seven hundred and eighty-four ; and in case the Rates and Duties hereby granted shall not be sufficient to answer the said weekly Payments hereby directed to be made, that then and so often the Deficiency and Deficiencies thereof shall be supplied and made good out of the whole Receipt of the Rates and Duties of Postage ; and in case the Rates and Duties hereby granted shall be more than sufficient to answer the said weekly Payments, that then, and so often as it shall so happen, the Overplus shall be appropriated and applied to such and the same Uses as the present Rates and Duties of Postage are respectively now by Law made applicable.

XI. And, to the End the said weekly Sum of two thousand three hundred Pounds may be made a Fund or Security for the Purposes herein expressed ; be it further enacted, That there shall be provided and kept, in the Office of the Auditor of the Receipt of the Exchequer, a Book or Books, in which all the Monies which shall be paid in weekly as aforesaid, for or upon Account of the said Rates and Duties, shall be entered separate, apart, and distinct from all other Monies paid and payable to his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, upon any Account whatsoever ; and the said weekly Payments shall be a Fund for the Payment of the several Annuities and all such other Charges and Expences as are directed to be paid and payable, pursuant to an Act of this present Session of Parliament, intituled, An Act for raising a certain Sum of Money by way of Annuities, and for establishing a Lottery.

XII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall at any Time or Times be sued, molested, or prosecuted, for any Thing by him or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter, or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the Special Matter in Evidence for his or their Defence ; and if upon Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him or them against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 25 George III, Cap. 57 - July 15, 1785

An Act to exempt Carriages, carrying the Mail, from paying Tolls at any Turnpike Gate in Great Britain.

WHEREAS by several Acts of Parliament, made for repairing particular Roads in this Kingdom, Carriages, Horses, and other Cattle, employed in the Conveyance of the Mail or Packet, are exempt from the Payment of the Tolls directed to be levied by such Acts : And whereas, by several other Acts of Parliament, Horses only that are employed in carrying the Mail or Packet are exempt from the Payment of the said Tolls : And whereas it may be of Advantage to the Publick that the Mail, or Packet, should be conveyed to different Parts of the Kingdom by Carriages or Publick Diligences, which renders it expedient that all Carriages, as well as Horses and other Cattle, conveying the Mail or Packet from one Part of this Kingdom to another, should be exempt from the Payment of Tolls at all and every Turnpike, Toll-gate, or Bar, erected or set up by Authority of Parliament ; be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the fifteenth Day of July, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-five, all Carriages of what Description soever, or Horses, which shall be employed in conveying from one Part of this Kingdom to another the Mail or Packet, which shall be made up under the Authority or Direction of his Majesty’s Postmaster General, or his Deputy or Deputies, shall be, and the same are hereby exempted, freed, and discharged from the Payment of any Tolls whatsoever that shall or may be demanded for the Passage of Carriages or Horses, through any Turnpike, Toll-gate, or Bar, at which any Toll is collected by any Act or Acts of Parliament now in force ; and all Turnpike Keepers or Toll Collectors are hereby directed and required to permit such Carriages and Horses to pass through all and every Turnpike, Toll-gate, or Bar, without demanding any Toll or Duty for so doing ; any Thing in any Act or Acts of Parliament contained to the contrary notwithstanding.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 27 George III, Cap. 9 - January 23, 1787

An act for granting rates of postage for the conveyance of letters and packets, between Great Britain and the port of Waterford, in the kingdom of Ireland, by way of Milford Haven.

WHEREAS it hath been found necessary, for the convenience and improvement of trade and commerce, and for the more speedy conveyance of letters and packets between Great Britain end Ireland, to establish packet boats between the port of Milford Haven in the county of Pembroke, and the port of Waterford in the kingdom of Ireland ; be it therefore enacted by the King’s most excellent majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and commons, in this present parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, That, from and after the fifth day of April, one thousand seven hundred and eighty-seven, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s postmaster general, and his deputy and deputies, by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the use or his Majesty, his heirs and successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the port and conveyance of all and every the letters and packets that shall be carried or conveyed, by packet boats, to or from the port of Milford Haven aforesaid, or to or from any other convenient port in the kingdom of Great Britain, from or to the port of Waterford aforesaid, or from or to any other convenient port in the said kingdom of Ireland, ( over and above all other rates payable for the portage and conveyance of such letters and packets ), according to the rates and sums hereafter mentioned, ( the same being rated either by the letter, or by the ounce ), that is to say

For every single letter, sixpence :
For every double letter, one shilling :
For every treble letter, one shilling and sixpence ;
And for every ounce, two shillings :

And so in proportion for every packet of deeds, writs, and other things.

II. Provided always, and be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That no letter or packet, sent by the post from or to London, to or from the port of Waterford aforesaid, by way of Milford Haven, shall be charged with an higher rate of postage than letters and packets sent from or to London, to or from Dublin, by the way of Holyhead, are now rated and liable to pay.

III. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the monies to arise by the rates and duties aforesaid, ( except the monies which shall be necessary to defray such expences as shall be incurred in the collection and management of the same ), shall be appropriated and applied to such and the same uses as the present rates and duties of postage are now, or shall be respectively made applicable.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 33 George III, Cap. 60 - June 17, 1793

An Act to enable the Postmaster General to send the Mail to the Dominions of His Catholick Majesty, on board of any Vessels authorised by His Catholick Majesty to carry the same.
[ 17th June 1793 ]

WHEREAS by an Act, passed in the ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of the War, and other Her Majesty’s Occasions ; it is provided, That if the Packet or Mail shall be carried out of Great Britain into any Port or Place beyond the Seas in any Ship or Vessel which is not a free Ship, and navigated with such Seamen as by the Laws of this Land the same are required to be, that then, and in every such case, the Postmaster General for the time being shall forfeit the Sum of one hundred Pounds Sterling, the one Moiety to Her Majesty, her Heirs and Successors, and the other Moiety to him or them who shall sue for the same, to be recovered in such manner as therein is mentioned : And whereas it is in contemplation to establish Packet Boats between the Port of Falmouth in England, and Corunna in Spain, for the Port of Letters, Packets and Parcels of Goods, to or from His Majesty’s Dominions, and the Dominions of His Catholick Majesty ; and it will tend much to the Convenience of Trade and Commerce between the two Kingdoms, if His Majesty’s Postmaster General shall be permitted to send the Packet or Mail by Packet Boats, authorised and appointed by His Catholick Majesty, whenever he shall see Occasion ; Be it therefore enacted by the King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General for the time being, or Persons holding the Office of Postmaster General, and he and they are hereby authorised and impowered from time to time, and as often as he or they hall fee Occasion, to send the Packet or Mail intended for the Dominions of His Catholick Majesty from Falmouth aforesaid, by any Ship or Vessel belonging to His said Catholick Majesty, and duly authorised and employed by him, for the Purpose of carrying Packets or Mails between the two Countries ; any thing in the said hereinbefore recited Act contained to the contrary thereof in any wise notwithstanding.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 34 George III, Cap. 18 - March 28, 1794

An Act for regulating the portage and conveyance of letters by the carriage called The Penny Post.
[ March 28, 1794 ]

WHEREAS every letter sent by the penny post from London or Westminster, the borough of Southwark, or the respective suburbs thereof, and delivered to any person at any place out of the cities of London and Westminster, the borough of Southwark, and the respective suburbs thereof, is subject to the charge of one penny, over and above the penny paid upon putting every such letter into the penny post office : and whereas, towards defraying the expence of a more frequent and speedy delivery of letters by the penny post, it is reasonable that letters conveyed by the said carriage called The Penny Post, from places out of the said cities and borough, and the suburbs thereof, to places within those cities and boroughs, and the suburbs thereof, should be charged with the payment of an additional penny in like manner : may it therefore please your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most excellent majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the lords spiritual and temporal, and commons, in this present parliament assembled, and by the authority of the same, That, from and after the passing this act, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s postmaster general, and his deputy and deputies, officer and officers, by him thereunto sufficiently authorised, to demand, have, receive, and take for the conveyance of every letter originally sent by the said carriage called The Penny Post, and not first passing by the general post from any place out of the cities of London and Westminster, the borough of Southwark, and the respective suburbs thereof, to any place within the said cities and borough, and the suburbs thereof respectively, the sum of one penny in addition to the sum of one penny now payable for the conveyance of every such letter.

II. And whereas a penny per letter for every letter originally sent by the penny post ( and not first passing by the general post ), to any place within the delivery of the penny post is now paid on putting every such letter into a penny post office : and whereas it may be convenient that the postage of letters should be paid in one sum, either on putting in the same or on delivery thereof, at the option of the persons sending the same ; be it therefore further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be optional in the person and persons sending any letter or letters originally by the penny post ( and not first passing by the general post ), either to pay the postage of every such letter or not, as he or they may think proper, on putting the same into any penny post office, and that where the postage shall be paid by the person sending the same, such letter shall be delivered free from any other rate or duty of postage.

III. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and maybe lawful to and for his Majesty’s postmaster general, and his deputy and deputies, officer and officers, to demand, have, receive, and take for the conveyance of every letter originally sent by the penny post, ( and not first passing by the general post ), the postage whereof shall not be paid on putting the same into a penny post office, the several rates or sums of money herein-after mentioned ; ( that is to say),

For the conveyance of every letter sent from any place within the cities of London and Westminster, the borough of Southwark, and the respective suburbs thereof, to any other place within the same cities and borough, and the suburbs thereof, the sum of one penny :

And for the conveyance of every letter sent from any place within the same cities and borough, and the suburbs thereof, to any place out of the same, the sum of two-pence :

And for the conveyance of every letter sent from any place out of the said cities and borough, and the suburbs thereof respectively, to any place within the same, or from any place out of the said cities and borough, and the suburbs thereof, to any other place out of the same, the sum of two-pence.

IV. Provided always, That nothing herein contained shall extend to exempt letters put into a penny post office to be forwarded by the general post, from the payment of the duty now chargeable thereon on putting the same into such penny post, but that the sum of one penny a letter for each letter put into a penny post office to be forwarded by the general post, shall be paid upon putting the same into a penny post office as heretofore ; any thing herein-before contained to the contrary thereof in anywise notwithstanding.

V. Provided also, and be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the sum of one penny per letter, payable upon the delivery of every letter originally passing by the general post, directed to any person at any place or places beyond the delivery of the inland or foreign department of the general post office, and within the delivery of the penny post, shall be paid on delivery by the penny post, in the manner directed by an act, made and passed in the fifth year of the reign of his present Majesty, ( intituled, An Act to alter certain rates of postage, and to amend, explain, and enlarge several provisions in an act, made in the ninth year of the reign of Queen Anne, and in other acts relating to the revenue of the post office ) ; any thing herein-before contained to the contrary thereof in anywise notwithstanding.

VI. And whereas the conveyance of letters by the penny post is by law limited to ten English miles distant from the general post office in London : and whereas it may be expedient to extend the conveyance of letters by the said post beyond that distance in certain cafes ; be it therefore further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s postmaster general, for the time being, at any time after the passing of this act, at his and their discretion to extend the conveyance and delivery of letters by the said carriage called The Penny Post, beyond the distance of ten English miles from the said general post office in London ; any law, statute, custom, or usage to the contrary thereof in anywise notwithstanding.

VII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That all and every the powers, authorities, and regulations herein contained, with respect to the post called The Penny Post, established within the cities of London and Westminster, and borough of Southwark, and the respective suburbs thereof, shall extend and be applied to several cities and towns, and the places adjacent thereto respectively, in which penny post offices are already established, or hereafter maybe established, within Great Britain, and that postmaster general, for the time being, shall and may in his discretion extend the conveyance and delivery of letters by the post beyond the distance of ten English miles from such cities and towns in which penny post offices are already or may hereafter be established, and that the same rates of postage hereby made payable, shall and may be received in such cities, towns, and places respectively.

VIII. And be it further enacted by the authority aforesaid, That the surplus which shall remain at the end of each quarter of all monies arising by the said rates and duties by this act granted, after defraying the additional expence of the more frequent delivery of letters by the penny post, shall be, and be deemed part of the revenue of the general letter office, or post office, or office of postmaster general, and shall be carried to and made part the consolidated fund.

IX. And be it further enacted, That if any person or persons shall at any time or times be sued, molested, or prosecuted, any thing by him or them done or executed in pursuance of act, or of any clause, matter, or thing herein contained, such person and persons shall and may plead the general issue, and give the special matter in evidence for his or their defence ; and if upon the trial a verdict shall pass for the defendant or defendants, or the plaintiff or plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such defendant or defendants hall have treble costs awarded to him or them, against such plaintiff or plaintiffs.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

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Act, 35 George III, Cap. 53 - May 5, 1795

An Act for further regulating the sending and receiving Letters free from the Duty of Postage ; for allowing Non-commissioned Officers, Seamen, and private Men, in the Navy and Army, whilst on Service, to send and receive Letters at a low Rate of Postage ; and for permitting Patterns and Samples of Goods to be transmitted by the Post at an easier Rate than is now allowed by Law.
[ 5th May 1795 ]

WHEREAS it is expedient further to regulate the sending and receiving Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage ; be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That, from and after the passing of this Act, no Letter or Packet whatsoever, sent by the Post from any Place within the Kingdom of Great Britain, directed by or to any Member of either of the two Houses of Parliament of Great Britain, shall be exempted from the Payment of the Duty of Postage, according to the Rates by Law established, if such Letter or Packet shall exceed one Ounce in Weight.

II. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That no Letter or Packet, directed by any Member of either of the said two Houses of Parliament, shall, from and after the passing of this Act, be exempted from the Payment of the Duty of Postage, unless the Member whose Name shall be indorsed thereon, pursuant to the Laws now in force, shall actually be in the Post Town into the Post Office of which every such Letter or Packet shall be put, or within the Limits of the Delivery of Letters for such Post Town, or within twenty Miles of such Post Town, on the Day, or on the Day before the Day, on which such Letter or Packet shall be put into the Post Office.

III. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That no Member of either of the said two Houses of Parliament shall be entitled or allowed to send by the Post, free from the Duty of Postage, superscribed or directed by him, more than ten Letters in any one Day ; nor shall be entitled or allowed to receive by the Post, free from the Duty of Postage, more than fifteen Letters directed to him in any one Day.

IV. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That whenever the Number of Letters or Packets, not weighing more than one Ounce each, sent or received by any Member of either of the two Houses of Parliament in any one Day, shall exceed the Number exempted by this Act from the Duty of Postage, and the Rates of Postage on the said Letters or Packets respectively, or any of them, shall differ ; then such of the said Letters or Packets as would be chargeable with a higher Rate of Postage than the Remainder, shall be included in the Number so exempted, in preference to any which would be chargeable with a lower Rate of Postage ; and the Remainder of such Letters or Packets shall be chargeable with the several Rates of Postage respectively to which such Letters or Packets would now by Law be chargeable if sent or received by any Persons not entitled to send or receive Letters or Packets free from the Duty of Postage.

V. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That the several Persons who, by virtue of any Act or Acts of Parliament, are authorized, in Right of their respective Offices and Employments, to send and receive Letters free from Postage, and their Successors in such Offices and Employments, shall and may, during their Continuance in such Offices and Employments respectively, send and receive Letters and Packets, free from the Duty of Postage, in the same Manner, and under such Restrictions, as they now send and receive the same.

VI. Provided always, and it is hereby further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall extend to charge with the Duty of Postage, any printed Votes or Proceedings in Parliament, or printed Newspapers, being sent without Covers, or in Covers open at the Sides, which shall be signed on the Outside thereof by the Hand of any Member of Parliament, in such Manner as hath been heretofore practised, or which shall be directed to any Member of Parliament, at any Place whereof he shall have given Notice in Writing to the Postmaster General, or to his Deputy ; but that all such Votes, Proceedings, and Newspapers, so sent and signed or directed as aforesaid, shall be received free of the Duty of Postage ; any Thing in this, or any former Act, to the contrary notwithstanding.

VII. And whereas it is expedient that the Non-commissioned Officers, Seamen, and Privates, employed in his Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery, and Marines, should, whilst on Service, be permitted to send and receive single Letters by the Post, on their own private Concerns, at a low Rate of Postage ; be it therefore further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That, from and after the passing of this Act, no single Letter sent by the Post from any Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private, employed in his Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery, or Marines, shall, with such Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private respectively, shall be employed on his Majesty’s Service, and not otherwise, be charged and chargeable, by virtue of any Act of Parliament now in force, with the higher Rate of Postage than the Sum of one Penny for the Conveyance of each such Letter ; such Rate of Postage than the Sum of one Penny for the Conveyance of each such Letter ; such Rate of Postage of one Penny for each such Letter to be paid at the Time of putting the same into the Post Office of the Town or Place from whence such Letter is intended to be sent by the Post : Provided nevertheless, that no Letter or Letters sent by the Post, from any Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private, employed in his Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery, or Marines, shall be exempted from the Payment of the Rate of Postage chargeable upon Letters according to the Laws now in force, unless there shall be written upon every such Letter, in the Hand Writing of, and signed by the Commanding Officer for the Time being of the Ship or Vessel, or of the Corps, Regiment, or Detachment, to which such Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private, employed in his Majesty’s Service, shall respectively belong, the Name of such Commanding Officer, and of the Ship, Vessel, Corps, Regiment, or Detachment, commanded by him.

VIII. And be it further enacted by the Authority aforesaid, That, from and after the passing of this Act, no single Letter sent by the Post, directed to any Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private, employed in his Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery, or Marines, upon his own private Concerns only, whilst such respective Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private shall be employed on his Majesty’s Service, and not otherwise, shall be charged or chargeable by virtue of any Act of Parliament now in force, with an higher Rate of Postage than the Sum of one Penny for each such Letter ; which Sum of one Penny shall be paid at the Time of the Delivery thereof : Provided nevertheless, that no such Letter shall be exempted from the Rate of Postage chargeable upon Letters according to the Laws now in force, unless every such Letter shall be directed to such Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private, employed in his Majesty’s Service, specifying the Ship, Vessel, Regiment, Troop, Corps, Company, or Detachment, to which he may belong ; and provided also, that it shall not be lawful for the Deputy Postmaster of the Town or Place to which such Letter shall be sent to be delivered, to deliver such Letter to any Person except to the Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private, to whom such Letter shall be directed, or to any Person appointed to receive the same by the Commanding Officer of the Ship, Vessel, Regiment, Troop, Corps, Company, or Detachment, to which the Non-commissioned Officer, Seaman, or Private, to whom such Letter shall be directed, shall belong.

IX. And whereas by an Act passed in the twenty-sixth Year of the Reign of his late Majesty King George the Second, intituled, An Act for the more effectually preventing the fraudulent Removals of Tobacco by Land or Water, and for the Ease of the fair Trader in Tobacco ; and for ascertaining the Rates payable for the Postage of certain Letters ; and for amending and explaining the Laws relating to the Sale of Spirituous Liquors by Retail ; it was declared and enacted, that, for every single Letter or Cover, containing one or more Paper or Papers, with Patterns, or containing one or more Pattern or Patterns of Cloth, Silk, or Stuff, or one or more Sample or Samples of any other Sort of Goods, or one or more Piece or Pieces of any other Sort of Thing inclosed therein, or affixed thereto, though not Paper, if the same together did not weigh an Ounce, the Rates payable for a double Letter should be paid, and no more : And whereas it may be expedient to permit Patterns of Cloth, Silk, Stuff, and other Goods, and small Samples of other Sorts of Things, to be transmitted by the Post at a more easy Rate of Postage : Be it therefore enacted, That, from and after the passing of this Act, every Packet or Cover containing therein, or having affixed thereto, one or more Paper or Papers with Patterns, or one or more Pattern or Patterns of Cloth, Silk, Stuff, or other Goods, or one or more Sample or Samples of any other Sort of Thing, not exceeding together one Ounce in Weight, shall be chargeable and charged with no higher Rate of Postage than as a single Letter, so as every such Packet or Cover shall be sent open at the Sides, and without any Letter or Writing in, upon, or with such Packet or Cover, other than the Name or Names of the Person or Persons sending the same, and the Place or Places of his or their Abode, and the Prices of the Articles contained therein, or affixed thereto.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

Post by rossi »

Act, 37 George III, Cap. 18 - December 28, 1796

An Act for altering certain Rates of Postage for Conveyance of Letters in England and Scotland respectively, and of Packets to and from Great Britain, from and to Portugal and the British Colonies in America respectively ; and for setting apart, at the Receipt of the Exchequer, for a certain Period, out of the Revenues of the Post Office, the Annual Sum of forty thousand Pounds, towards defraying the increased Charge occasioned by any Loan raised, or Stock created, by any Act or Acts passed in the thirty-fifth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty.
[ 28th December 1796 ]

Most Gracious Sovereign,

WHEREAS it is expedient that certain Rate of Postage established by an Act of the ninth Year of the Reign of her late Majesty Queen Anne, and by two several Acts of the fifth and twenty-fourth Years of your Majesty’s Reign, should be repealed: We, your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, as well for the Purposes aforesaid, as towards raising the necessary Supplies to defray your Majesty’s Public Expences, and making a permanent Addition to the Public Revenue, have freely and voluntarily resolved to give and grant unto your Majesty the Rates and Duties herein after mentioned ; and do therefore most humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That so much of an Act, made in the ninth Year of the Reign of her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a Weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof, for the Service of the War, and other her Majesty’s Occasions ; and so much of an Act, made in the fifth Year of your most Gracious Majesty’s Reign, intituled, An Act to alter certain Rates of Postage ; and to amend, explain, and enlarge, several Provisions in an Act made in the ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, and in other Acts relating to the Revenue of the Post Office ; and also so much of another Act, passed in the twenty-fourth Year of your most Gracious Majesty’s Reign, intituled, An Act for granting to his Majesty certain additional Rates of Postage for Conveyance of Letters and Packets, by the Post, within the Kingdom of Great Britain ; for preventing Frauds in the Revenue, carried on by the Conveyance of certain Goods in Letters and Packets ; and for further preventing Frauds and Abuses in relation to the sending and receiving of Letters and Packets free from Postage, as establishes certain Rates or Sums for the Port and Conveyance of Letters and Packets within that Part of the Kingdom of Great Britain called England, the Dominion of Wales, and the Town of Berwick upon Tweed, shall, from and after the fifth Day of January one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, be, and the same are hereby repealed.

II. And be it further enacted, That from and after the said fifth Day of January one thousand seven and ninety-seven, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the Use of his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which he shall convey, carry, or send Post, within that Part of Great Britain aforesaid, according to the several Rates and Sums herein-after mentioned, the same being rated by the Letter or by the Ounce ; that to say,

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter so conveyed or carried by the Post, not exceeding fifteen measured Miles from the Office where such Letter may be put in, to the Office where such Letter may be delivered, within that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, the Sum of Three-pence ; for every Double Letter Sixpence ; for every Treble Letter Nine-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight one Shilling ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter conveyed or carried by the Post above fifteen measured Miles, and not exceeding thirty measured Miles from the Office where such Letter may be in, to the Office where such Letter may be delivered, within that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, the Sum of Four-pence ; for every Double Letter Eight-pence ; for every Treble Letter one Shilling ; and every Ounce in Weight one Shilling and Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter conveyed or carried by the Post above thirty measured Miles, and not exceeding sixty measured Miles from the Office where such Letter may be put in, to the Office where such Letter may be delivered, within that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, the Sum of Five-pence ; for every Double Letter Ten-pence ; for every Treble Letter one Shilling and Three-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight one Shilling and Eight-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter conveyed or carried by the Post above sixty Miles, and not exceeding one hundred measured Miles from the Office where such Letter may be put in, to the Office where such Letter may be delivered, within that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, the Sum of Sixpence ; for every Double Letter one Shilling ; for every Treble Letter one Shilling and Sixpence ; and every Ounce in Weight two Shillings ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter conveyed or carried by the Post above one hundred measured Miles, and not exceeding one hundred and fifty measured Miles from the Office where such Letter may be put in, to the Office where such Letter may be delivered, within that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, the Sum of Seven-pence ; for every Double Letter one Shilling and Two-pence ; for every Treble Letter one Shilling and Nine-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight two Shillings and Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater W eight than an Ounce :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter conveyed or carried by the Post one hundred and fifty measured Miles, or upwards, from the Office where such Letter may be put in, to the Office where such Letter may be delivered, within that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, the Sum of Eight-pence ; for every Double Letter one Shilling and Four-pence ; for every Treble Letter two Shillings ; and for every Ounce in Weight two Shillings and Eight-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet greater Weight than an Ounce.

III. And be it further enacted, That from and after the said fifth Day of January one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, over and above the Rates of Postage now payable, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which he hall convey, carry, or send Post, within Scotland, the additional Rate of Postage herein after mentioned ; that is to say,

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter one Penny ; for every Double Letter Two-pence ; for every Treble Letter Three-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce.

IV. And be it further enacted, That so much of the said Act, made in the ninth Year of the Reign of her late Majesty Queen Anne, as establishes Rates of Postage for Letters from and to London, to and from Portugal; and so much of the said Act, made in the fifth Year of your most Gracious Majesty’s Reign, as establishes Rates of Postage for Letters from and to London, to and from the British Dominions in America, shall, from and after the said fifth Day of January one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, be, and the same are hereby repealed ; and that, from and after the said filth Day of January one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters, Packets, and other Things, which shall be carried or conveyed from or to the Kingdom of Great Britain, to or from the Kingdom of Portugal, a Packet Postage according to the several Rates herein-after mentioned ; that is to say,

For all Letters and Packets, passing from any Part of the Kingdom of Great Britain to Lisbon, or to any other Port in the Kingdom of Portugal, and from any such Port into Great Britain ; for every Single Letter one Shilling ; for every Double Letter two Shillings ; for every Treble Letter three Shillings ; and for every Ounce in Weight four Shillings ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce.

V. And be it further enacted, That from and after the said fifth Day of January one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all and every Letters, Packets, and other Things, which shall be carried or conveyed from or to the Kingdom of Great Britain, to or from any Port within the British Dominions in America, a Packet Postage according to the several Rates hereinafter mentioned; that is to say,

For all Letters and Packets passing from any Part of the Kingdom of Great Britain, to any Port within the British Dominions in America, and from any such Port into Great Britain ; for every Single Letter one Shilling ; for every Double Letter two Shillings ; for every Treble Letter three Shillings ; and for every Ounce in Weight four Shillings ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce.

VI. And be it further enacted, That over and above the Rates aforesaid, all Letters and Packets passing to or from Portugal, from or to that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, or to or from the British Dominions in America, from or to that Part of Great Britain as aforesaid, shall be charged with the full Inland Rate of Postage hereby established, according to the Distance such Letters and Packets shall be conveyed within England, the Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, and with the full Inland Rate of Postage now payable, together with the additional Rate of Postage hereby established, according to the Distance such Letters and Packets shall be conveyed within Scotland.

VII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That no Letter or Packet, together with the Contents thereof, shall be rated at an higher Rate of Postage, according to the Rates and Duties hereby granted, than as a Treble Letter, unless the same shall be one Ounce in Weight ; and that all Letters and Packets of the Weight of one Ounce, shall be rated as four Single Letters, and in Proportion for every Quarter of an Ounce above the Weight of an Ounce, reckoning each Quarter of an Ounce as a Single Letter.

VIII. Provided also, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall increase or alter, or be construed to increase or alter, the Amount or Manner of charging the Rates of Postage upon Single Letters to be sent by the Post by or to Non-commissioned Officers, Seamen, and Privates, on their own private Concerns, whilst such Non-commissioned Officers, Seamen, and Privates, shall be employed in his Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery, and Marines, made payable by an Act passed in the thirty-fifth Year of your most Gracious Majesty’s Reign, intituled, An act for further regulating the sending and receiving Letters free from the Duty of Postage ; for allowing Non-commissioned Officers, Seamen, and Private Men, in the Navy and Army, whilst on Service, to send and receive Letters at a low rate of Postage ; and for permitting Patterns and Samples of Goods to be transmitted by Post at an easier Rate than is now allowed by Law ; any Thing herein-before contained to the contrary therefore in anywise notwithstanding.

IX. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the said fifth Day of January one thousand seven hundred and ninety-seven, all and every the Clauses, Provisions, Powers, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, and Methods for the Recovery of the same, and all other Matters and Things in Force, at the Time of passing this Act, and contained in the said Act, made in the ninth Year of the Reign of her late Majesty Queen Anne, or in any other Act of Acts of Parliament, so as far the same relates to the Post Office, ( and not repealed or altered by this Act, ) shall continue in Force, and shall be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend, to this present Act, as fully and effectually, to all Intents and Purposes, as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in the Body of this present Act.

X. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates and Duties herein-before granted shall be paid, from Time to Time, into the Hands of the Receiver General for the Time being of the Post Office, who shall pay the same ( the necessary Charges for collecting, paying, and accounting for the time being first deducted ) into the Receipt of his Majesty’s Exchequer, on such Days and Times and in such Manner as the Rates and Duties hereby repealed were, by any Law in Force at and immediately before the passing of this Act, directed to be paid ; and the said Money, so paid into the said Receipt as aforesaid, shall be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund.

XI. And whereas the annual average Produce of the Revenue of the Post Office for three Years, ending on the fifth Day of April one thousand seven hundred and ninety-five, amounted to four hundred and ten thousand five hundred and fifty-six Pounds : And whereas by an Act, passed in the thirty-filth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, intituled, An act for further regulating the sending and receiving Letters free from the Duty of Postage ; for allowing Non-commisioned Officers, Seamen, and Private Men, in the Navy and Army, whilst on Service, to send and receive Letters at a low Rate of Postage ; and for permitting Patterns and Samples of Goods lo be transmitted by the Post at an easier Rate than is now allowed by Law, the said Revenue hath been increased by a Sum computed at the annual Sum of forty thousand Pounds, communibus annis: Be it further enacted, That, out of the Monies to arise from the said Revenue of the Post Office, the Sum of one hundred and two thousand six hundred and thirty-nine Pounds, being one-fourth Part of the annual average Amount before mentioned, shall Quarterly on the fifth Day of April, the fifth Day of July, the tenth Day of October, and the fifth Day of January in every Year, during the Periods herein-after mentioned, be set apart from the Remainder of the said Revenue ; and that the Sum of ten thousand Pounds of the said Remainder of the said Revenue, shall Quarterly, for the Period of eight Years from the passing of this Act, be paid into the Receipt of his Majesty’s Exchequer, separate and apart from all other Branches of the Public Revenue, and that the Amount thereof, or so much as shall be sufficient, shall be deemed an Addition made to the Public Revenue, for the Purpose of defraying the increased Charge occasioned by any Loan raised, or Stock created, by any Act or Acts passed in the said thirty-fifth Year of the Reign of his present Majesty ; and that after setting apart the Amount of the annual Averages aforesaid, and the said further annual Sum of forty thousand Pounds, the Remainder of the said Revenue of the Post Office shall, during the Period of ten Years after the passing of this Act, be paid into the Receipt of his Majesty’s Exchequer, distinctly and apart from all other Branches of the Public Revenue ; and that the said Remainder of the said Rate so paid, into the said Receipt, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient, shall be deemed an Addition made to the Revenue, for the Purpose of defraying the increased Charge occasioned by any Loan made or to be made, or Stock created or to be created, by virtue of any Act or Acts passed or to be passed in this Session of Parliament ; and that there shall be provided and kept in the Office of the Auditor of the said Receipt, during the said respective Periods, Books in which the said annual Sum of forty thousand Pounds, and the said Remainder of the Monies arising from the said Revenue of the Post Office, shall together with the Monies arising from any other Duties granted in this Session of Parliament, for the Purpose of defraying such increased Charge as aforesaid, be entered separate and apart from all other Monies paid or payable to his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, upon any Account Whatever.

XII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall at any Time or Times be sued, molested, or prosecuted, for any Thing by him or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter, or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the special Matter in Evidence for his or their Defence ; and if upon the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become non-suited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him or them against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

Post by rossi »

Act, 39 George III, Cap. 76 - July 12, 1799

An Act for the more secure Conveyance of Ship Letters, and for granting to His Majesty certain Rates of Postage thereon.
[ 12th July 1799 ]

WHEREAS it may be expedient for the Benefit of Commerce and Correspondence, that Permission be given to his Majesty’s Postmaster General to receive Letters and Packets, in order to be conveyed to and from Places within his Majesty’s Dominions, also to and from every or any the Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, by Ships and Vessels ( other than Packet Boats ) ; and also that the Postmaster General be authorized to demand and receive certain Rates of Postage for such Conveyance of the said Letters and Packets : We, therefore, your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of Great Britain, in Parliament assembled, have freely and voluntarily resolved to give and grant unto your Majesty the Rates and Duties herein-after mentioned ; and do most humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That, from and after the pasting of this Act, it shall and may be lawful to and for his Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, in his and their Discretion, to collect and receive Letters, and Packets of Letters, directed to Places within his Majesty’s Dominions, also to any the Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, and to forward the same by any Ships or Vessels that he, in his Discretion shall think fit ( although not Packet Boats ) ; and also, that it shall and may be lawful to and for his said Majesty s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for every Letter and Packet which shall be delivered to him or his Deputies for Conveyance in the Manner herein-before specified, a Sum not less than one Half Part of the Rates and Duties payable by Law for such respective Letters and Packets, if the fame were conveyed by Packet Boats ; and in Cafes where no Rate of Postage is already established, then to demand, have, receive, and take, for such Letters and Packets, Rates, as near as the same can be ascertained, equal to one Half of what is now paid for Letters sent beyond the Seas ; any Law, Statute, Custom, or Usage, to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.

II. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the said Postmaster General to demand, have, receive, and take for every Letter and Packet which shall be brought by Ships and Vessels ( other than Packet Boats ) in the Manner herein-before mentioned, from Places within his Majesty’s Dominions, and from any the Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas into Great Britain, to be conveyed by inland Carriage or Postage, the Sum of Four-pence for every single Letter, and so in Proportion for Packets, in addition to any inland or internal Postage which may arise upon the inland Conveyance of such Letters and Packets ; and for the Encouragement of the Masters of such Ships or Vessels, it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General to allow all such Masters the Sum of Two-pence a Letter or Packet upon all such Letters and Packets as they shall respectively have or take on board such Vessel or Vessels, provided such Letters and Packets shall have been delivered to them from the Post Office ; and in like Manner, on their Arrival from Parts beyond the Seas, on their delivering unto the Deputy or Deputies of the Postmaster General for such Place or Post Town at which they shall touch or arrive, it shall be lawful to pay to such Masters of Ships and Vessels the Sum of Two-pence a Letter or Packet for all such Letters and Packets as they shall respectively have on board ; provided that such Letters and Packets shall have been regularly delivered unto the said Masters by the Deputy or Deputies of the Postmaster General, or any other Persons to be authorized by him, at the Place or Post Town from whence such Ships or Vessels have failed or departed.

III. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the said Postmaster General to cause the Rates of Postage hereby chargeable and payable to be paid either prior to such Letters and Packets being forwarded, or on Delivery thereof, as to him in his Discretion may seem meet.

IV. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise by the Rates and Duties aforesaid ( except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Collection and Management of the same ) shall be paid into the Receipt of the Exchequer, and carried to and made a Part of the Consolidated Fund, and applied to such and the same Uses as the present Rates and Duties of Postage are now, or shall be directed to be paid and applied.

V. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall, at any Time or Times, be sued, molested, or prosecuted, for any Thing by him or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter, or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the special Matter in Evidence for his or their Defence ; and if upon the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him or them against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.
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Re: Postal acts of United Kingdom

Post by Global Administrator »

Andrea .. what an amazing resource and a TON of work ... many thanks.

It will get a lot of google indexing and assist 100s of scholars I am sure.

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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by GlenStephens »

I sold a copy of the actual 1694 UK Postal Act a few years back for $4,800!
Image
The wording I'll add here, as it might assist students who find Rossi's thread. :mrgreen:

Glen

=====================


The birthplace of philately. I have for sale the official abstracts of the Acts that first sanctioned the use of duty stamps on various documents in 1694 ..... 76 years before Captain Cook first set foot in Australia! They are not the far more common "Acts Of Parliament" extracts as typically appear on the market - one is a book, the other is a pamphlet. NO other copies are recorded in private hands of this historic pair.

These were the actual Acts that first initiated the use of Adhesive Stamps in Great Britain. I am selling these on behalf of a UK client - at a small fraction of what they might be fairly independently appraised at.

As many students of philately realise, the very first "stamps" were embossed on to "cypher" blue paper, which was attached to British documents used for a variety of purposes in payment of the official fee. It was a revenue-raising operation to fund war with the French, and intended as a temporary measure. These documents I have for sale were to put that process in train.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamp_Act

I am offering these 2 historic documents together as one lot. The first of these items I am offering was unsold in Stanley Gibbon's London 14th December 2006 auction (lot 922) where Gibbons placed an estimate of £15,000 to £17,000 (=$A37,500 to $A42,500) upon that single document - plus all the usual auction fees of course - one of which was an "unsold" insurance fee of about £200 (= $A500) before the owner got it back.

This text was illustrated in colour in the auction catalogue on plate 4, and in 'Gibbons Stamp Monthly' (November 2006, page.30, UK edition). The full SG Catalogue description is shown nearby. The document for sale was a 27 extensive page item, with a 4 page supplement.

The second item I am offering along with it, is considerably rarer than the one Gibbons ran to auction. It is unlikely that both variants will ever appear for sale together again. A unique opportunity. The seller bought both separately, and it is believed this is the first time a private collector has owned both at one time.

Someone may care to buy them and donate them in the philanthropic tradition to a National Postal Museum or similar body, and take the tax deduction for their "assessed" value? I feel sure many qualified appraisers would rate their value to be several times my asking price, especially if given the Gibbons auction estimate as a recent price reference guide.

These are the key texts for any English Revenue collectors - indeed for serious stamp collectors. And would make for a most impressive - and unique - preamble to any classic exhibit in this field. Condition - being ex UK - is remarkably good for their age.

There are NO "Private Collection" copies of either listed in the English Short Title Catalogue of the British Library. (ESTC) It lists over 460,000 items, mainly held in Britain and North America and published between 1473 and 1800. There may be other (unknown) copies held privately, but it is not likely, and the highly respected ESTC is a good indicator of rarity of any document in this era. Check for yourself:

https://estc.bl.uk/F/?func=file&file_name=login-bl-list

The 'book' copy (as opposed to the 'pamphlet' copy) is exceptionally rare.

Of the main text the only other copies recorded are at the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and at the Folger Shakespeare Library. HOWEVER, the Folger copy is a fragment, being only the third part. (The Bodleian Library is the main research library of the University of Oxford.)

One of the 1694 texts mentions a Thomas Arden. I am not sure if this might be one of the landed gentry Ardens - Shakespeare's mother's family. More research would be needed. However, if so, that would be the icing on the cake. (Mary Arden was William Shakespeare's mother.)

A fragment of this same document is in the impressive Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC, hence my strong suspicion of the direct family connection.

These documents were written just 28 years after the Great Fire Of London - which is mentioned in the text - some records were lost in the fire and they have pieced together what they could when compiling the work.

The small 'holes' you can see in the photo by the central spine, are the original 'stab holes'. When pamphlets were printed they were folded and 'stabbed'. They could then be held together with cord through these holes, when the leaves were slit on the edges to separate them.

They are gorgeous. Well over three hundred years old, yet written in English, and are proper working texts, describing the operation of the basic services of legal and economic administration. The Glorious Revolution of 1689 is taken as the dividing line between the religious disputes that led to the Civil Wars in the mid 17th Century and the disaster of James II. A precursor to the 'modern' world that came after - imperial expansion and the consumer revolution of the 18th Century.

It is the point in Northern Europe where the old world became recognisably the world we still live in. It was no longer about the divine right of a king and ministers discussing religious disputes, but about parliamentary democracy, taxation, and trade. The actual officers that dealt with the taxes and fees are named in the 'Exact Table of Fees' (including Thomas Arden!)

There may be a viable US market for these historic texts, as taxation in this manner via duty stamps, to fund European wars and fighting the French, played a primary part in initiating the American Revolution. "Taxation Without Representation" - and the Boston Tea Party, and all that followed.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stamp_Act

It is nice to be able to offer a real piece of history, and thank you for allowing me to indulge myself a little here to share the details of it.

I often get asked at social gatherings WHY anyone would want to be a stamp dealer. My answer is that every day of my working life is different and interesting. No two days are ever the same.

Being asked to sell and research fascinating historic lots like this is a fine example of that.

I would not trade that for quids.

Detailed library type notes on both documents and contents and size are below:


The Acts that First Instituted the Use of Adhesive Stamps in Great Britain.

[1.]

[all within a double rule, a2r:] AN ABSTRACT OF THE ACT Made in the 5th and 6th Years of Their Majesties Reign, for granting to Their Majesties several Duties upon Vellum, Parchment, and Paper, for Four Years, towards carrying on the War against France. [rule] By Order of the Queen and Council. [rule] London, Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Tho. Newcomb, deceased; Printers to the King and Queen's most Excellent Majesties: And sold by J. Walthoe in Vine Court, Middle Temple, 1694.

Small 8vo in 4's. 27, [5]pp. (a-d)4. Text block measures 9 x 15 cm. Cut close to marginal notes with loss of a couple of letters on b4r. Complete, clean, and fine. With the license leaf and the adverts. Disbound.

Slight nibbling to lower right corner, not affecting text, and primarily on the license leaf. Neat, manuscript '5' in top right corner of TP (item numbering within the original bound volume).

ESTC locates institutionally held copies at: 3 UK; 1 EU; 6 NA locations. No 'private collection' copies are noted.

Wing E960. ESTC R224778.

[2.]

[all within a double rule, A2r:] AN EXACT Table of Fees, OF ALL THE COURTS AT WESTMINSTER, As they were Delivered in Parliament by the Persons following. Viz. The CHANCERY, by Sir Miles Cook, Samuel Keck, Esquire, and others. The KINGS-BENCH, on the Plea-side, by W. Turbill and Nicholas Harding. On the Crown side, by R. Seyhard, and Richard Horton. The COMMON-PLEAS, by W. Farmerie, Silv. Petyt, and H. Clift. The EXCHEQUER, on the Plea-side, by R. Beresford. Tho. Arden, &c. On the Equity-side, by Butler Buggins, Esq; [rule] The Second Edition, Corrected. With the Additions of the Fees of the Clerks of the Peace of Middlesex and Surrey, the Clerk of Assize of the Home Circuit, the Fees of the Cursitors, and the Abstract of the Act of Vellum and Parchment, &c. [rule] LONDON: Printed by the Assigns of Richard and Edward Atkins, Esquires; for John Walthoe, at his Shop in Vine-Court Middle-Temple, M DC XCIV.

[cap. title, (a)r:] Midd. ff. [double rule] A TABLE OF FEES Now taken, and which have been anciently taken in the Office of Clerk of the Peace and Goal Delivery of the County of Middlesex.

[all within a double rule, Ar:] AN ABSTRACT OF THE ACT Made in the 5th and 6th Years of Their Majesties Reign, for granting to Their Majesties several Duties upon Vellum, Parchment, and Paper, for Four Years, towards carrying on the War against France. [rule] We do Approve this Abstract. EDW. WARD. THO. TREVOR. [rule] By Order of the Queen and Council. [rule] LONDON, Printed by Charles Bill, and the Executrix of Tho. Newcomb, deceased; Printers to the King and Queen's most Excellent Majesties: And sold by J. Walthoe in Vine Court, Middle-Temple,

8vo. [8], 116, [4], 24, 16pp. (A)4, (B-H)8, (I)4, ((a))8, ((b))4, (A)8.

3 parts, separate pagination and register to each part.

The [4]pp after p.116 are [4]pp of adverts for books printed for and sold by John Walthoe.

The second part has a bracketed register. (a); (a2); (a3) etc.

Order to print dated 14 November 1693 on A1v. Second text dated 'Nov. 20. 1693' on (b4)v, above the Errata. The text of the 3rd part is completely reset from Wing E960.

Generally good, fine in parts, some browning at start and end, esp. 3rd part, which has light pencil notes. Modern rebacking, older calf boards with early ms. titling on upper board.

ESTC locates institutionally held copies at the Bodleian Library, Oxford, and at the Folger Shakespeare Library, HOWEVER, the Folger copy is a fragment, being only the third part. (The Bodleian Library is the main research library of the University of Oxford. It is also a copyright deposit library and its collections are used by scholars from around the world.)

This issue of the text is very rare indeed, the third part not appearing in the first edition of this work. No 'private collection' copies are noted. The Folger copy being incomplete, this, alongside the copy at the Bodleian, is one of only two recorded complete copies known to exist.

Wing E3705A. ESTC R218236.


Glen

All also published here -

https://www.glenstephens.com/1694.html
.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 41 George III, Cap. 7 - March 24, 1801

An Act for repealing the Rates and Duties of Postage in Great Britain, and granting other Rates and Duties in lieu thereof, and on Letters conveyed to or from any Part of the United Kingdom from or to any Place out of the said Kingdom, and by Packet Boats from or to the Ports of Holyhead and Milford Haven.
[ 24th March 1801 ]

Most Gracious Sovereign,

WE, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in Parliament assembled, being desirous of raising the necessary Supplies to defray Your Majesty’s Publick Expences, and of making a permanent Addition to the Publick Revenue ; and thinking it expedient that the Rates of Postage established by an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, and by Four several Acts of the Fifth, Twenty-fourth, Thirty-fourth, and Thirty-seventh Year of Your Majesty’s Reign, should be repealed, and that other Rates of Postage should be granted ; have therefore freely and voluntarily resolved to give and grant unto Your Majesty, the Rates and Duties here-in-after mentioned ; and do therefore most humbly beseech Your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That the several Rates of Postage established within Great Britain by an Act, made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of the War, and other Her Majesty’s Occasions ; and by another Act, made in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, An Act to alter certain Rates of Postage ; and to amend, explain, and enlarge several Provisions in an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, and in other Acts relating to the Revenue of the Post Office ; and by another Act, made in the Twenty-fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, An Act for granting to His Majesty certain additional Rates of Postage for Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the Post within the Kingdom of Great Britain ; for preventing Frauds in the Revenue, carried on by the Conveyance of certain Goods in Letters and Packets ; and for further preventing Frauds and Abuses in relation to the sending and receiving of Letters and Packets free from Postage : and by another Act, made in the Thirty-seventh Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, An Act for altering certain Rates of Postage for Conveyance of Letters in England and Scotland respectively, and of Packets to and from Great Britain from and to Portugal and the British Colonies in America respectively ; and for setting apart, at the Receipt of the Exchequer for a certain Period out of the Revenues of the Post Office, the annual Sum of Forty thousand Pounds, towards defraying the encreased Charge occasioned by any Loan raised or Stock created, by any Act or Acts passed in the Thirty-fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty ; and also the Rate or Sum of One Penny established for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the Carriage called The Penny Post from any Place to any other Place, being respectively within the Cities of London and Westminster, the Borough of Southwark, and the respective Suburbs thereof, and of Letters put into the Penny Post Office to be forwarded by the General Post, by an Act made in the Thirty-fourth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, An Act for regulating the Portage and Conveyance of Letters by the Carriage called The Penny Post, shall, from and after the Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one, cease and determine, save and except in all Cases relating to the demanding, recovering, receiving, paying, or accounting for any Arrears thereof respectively, which may, on the said Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one remain unpaid, or any Fine, Penalty, or Forfeiture respecting the same, which shall have been incurred at any Time before the said Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one.

II. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the said Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one, it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster-General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which he shall convey, carry, or send Post within Great Britain, according to the several Rates and Sums herein-after mentioned, the same being rated by the Letter, or by the Ounce ; ( that is to say ),

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the General Post, not exceeding Fifteen measured Miles within Great Britain, for every single Letter Three-pence ; for every double Letter Sixpence ; for every treble Letter, or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Nine-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post above Fifteen measured Miles, and not exceeding Thirty Miles, within Great Britain, for every single Letter Four-pence ; for every double Letter Eight-pence ; for every treble Letter, or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling and Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post above Thirty measured Miles, and not exceeding Fifty Miles, within Great Britain, for every single Letter Five-pence ; for every double Letter Ten-pence ; for every treble Letter, or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling and Three-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling and Eight-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post above Fifty measured Miles, and not exceeding Eighty Miles, within Great Britain, for every single Letter Sixpence ; for every double Letter One Shilling ; for every treble Letter, or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling and Sixpence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Two Shillings and Sixpence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post above Eighty measured Miles, and not exceeding One hundred and twenty Miles, within Great Britain, for every single Letter Seven-pence ; for every double Letter One Shilling and Two-pence ; for every treble Letter, or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling and Nine-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Two Shillings and Four-pence, and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post above One hundred and twenty measured Miles, and not exceeding One hundred and seventy Miles, within Great Britain, for every single Letter Eight-pence ; for every double Letter One Shilling and Four-pence ; for every treble Letter, or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Two Shillings ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Two Shillings and Eight-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post above One hundred and seventy measured Miles, and not exceeding Two hundred and thirty Miles, within Great Britain, for every single Letter Nine-pence ; for every double Letter One Shilling and Sixpence ; for every treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Two Shillings and Three-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Three Shillings ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post above Two hundred and thirty measured Miles, and not exceeding Three hundred Miles, within Great Britain, for every single Letter Ten pence ; for every double Letter One Shilling and Eight-pence ; for every treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Two Shillings and Sixpence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Three Shillings and Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter by the Post, for every Distance of One hundred measured Miles above Three hundred Miles which such Letter shall be so carried or conveyed within Great Britain, a further Sum of One Penny ; for every double Letter, a like further Sum of Two-pence ; for every treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, a like further Sum of Three-pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, a like further Sum of Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

And where such Distance above Three hundred measured Miles shall not amount to One hundred Miles, the like further Sum for every single Letter One Penny ; for every double Letter, the like further Sum of Two-pence ; for every treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, the like further Sum of Three-pence ; for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, the like further Sum of Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

And where the Distance above Three hundred measured Miles hall exceed One hundred Miles, and so progressively for any like Excess of Distance of One hundred Miles, the like further Sum for every single Letter One Penny ; for every double Letter, the like further Sum of Two-pence ; for every treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, the like further Sum of Three-pence ; for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, the like further Sum of Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post to or from any Part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, from or to any Places out of the said Kingdom not within His Majesty’s Dominions, in Addition to all other Rates now payable, for every single Letter Four-pence ; for every double Letter Eight-pence ; for every treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, One Shilling and Four-pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce.

III. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster-General, and his Deputy and Deputies, Officer and Officers, to demand, have, receive, and take for the Conveyance of every Letter originally sent by the Post heretofore known by the Name of The Penny Post, ( and not first passing by the General Post ), the Postage whereof shall not be paid on putting the same into the Office of the said Post, the several Rates or Sums of Money herein-after mentioned ; ( that is to say, ) for the Conveyance of every Letter sent by the said Post from any Place within the Cities of London and Westminster, the Borough of Southwark, and the respective Suburbs thereof to any other Place within the same Cities and Borough and the Suburbs thereof, the Sum of Two-pence ; for the Conveyance of every Letter put into such last-mentioned Post Office to be forwarded by the General Post, the Sum of Two-pence.

IV. And be it further enacted, That from and after the said Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one, all Merchants’ Accounts, Bills of Exchange, Invoices, and Bills of Lading whatever, shall be rated, taxed, and paid for, as so many several Letters, or by the Ounce, according to the respective Rates by this Act made payable on Letters and Packets conveyed by the General Post.

V. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the passing of this Act, it shall be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster-General in his Discretion, to undertake, at the Expence of the Revenue of the Post Office, the Conveyance and Delivery of Letters directed to Persons abiding in Towns, Villages, and Places ( not being Post Towns ) from the respective Post Towns to which such Letters shall be carried by the Post in the usual Manner ; and also the Collection and Conveyance of Letters in and from such Towns, Villages, and Places, in order to be sent by the Post ; and to take such Sum and Sums of Money for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, for such respective extra Service to be performed, as shall and may from Time to Time be mutually agreed upon by and between the Postmaster-General and the Inhabitants respectively.

VI. Provided always nevertheless, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to hinder or prevent the Inhabitants of any such Towns, Villages, and Places respectively, from carrying one carrying or re-carrying, or employing any Messenger, Servant, or other Person to carry or re-carry any Letters or Packets, to or from the Post Town in such Manner as they have heretofore been accustomed and are by Law authorized ; any Thing herein contained to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.

VII. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise and be received for such extra Services as aforesaid shall, after paying the Expences incurred, be applied in such Manner as the present Rates of Postage are by Law applicable.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the passing of this Act, it shall be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster-General, in his Discretion, to enter into any Agreement or Agreements with, or to take Security from, any Person or Persons applying to him for that Purpose, for indemnifying His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, in Whole or in Part, and for such Time as the Postmaster-General may think necessary, against the Expences which shall or may be incurred beyond the Rates of Postage, by extending the Conveyance of Letters by Post to or from any Places where such Conveyance shall be extended at the Request of such Person or Persons, and it shall appear doubtful to the said Postmaster whether by extending the said Conveyance an additional Expence to the Revenue may not be incurred.

IX. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the said Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one, it shall be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster-General, and his Deputy and Deputies, by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets, that shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats from or to the Ports of Holyhead or Milford Haven, to or from any Ports in Ireland, over and above all the Rates payable for such Letters or Packets, a Packet Postage, according to the Rates or Sums herein-after mentioned ; that is to say, for every single Letter Two-pence ; for every double Letter Four-pence ; for every treble Letter, or other Letter less than an Ounce in Weight, Sixpence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Eight-pence ; and so in Proportion for every Letter or Packet exceeding an Ounce in Weight.

X. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall increase or alter, or be construed to increase or alter, the Amount or Manner of charging the Rates of Postage upon single Letters to be sent by the Post, by or to Seamen or Privates employed in His Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery, or Marines, upon their own private Concerns only, whilst such Seamen and Privates shall be employed in the Publick Service as aforesaid, made payable by an Act passed in the Thirty-fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, An Act for further regulating the sending and receiving Letters free from the Duty of Postage ; for allowing Non-commissioned Officers, Seamen, and Private Men, in the Navy and Army, whilst on Service, to send and receive Letters at a low Rate of Postage ; and for permitting Patterns and Samples of Goods to be transmitted by the Post at an easier Rate than is now allowed by Law ; any Thing herein-before contained to the contrary in anywise notwithstanding.

XI. Provided also, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall increase or alter, or be construed to increase or alter, the Amount or Manner of charging the Rate of Postage upon Letters, Packets, or Covers, containing Patterns of Cloth, Silk, Stuff, or other Goods, or Samples of other Sort of Things, not exceeding One Ounce in Weight, made payable by the said last-mentioned Act, passed in the Thirty-fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty ; any Thing herein-before contained to the contrary thereof in anywise notwithstanding.

XII. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the said Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one, all and every the Clauses, Provisions, Powers, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, and Methods, for the Recovery of the same, and all other Matters and Things in force at the Time of passing this Act, and contained in the said Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Her said late Majesty Queen Anne, or in any other of the before-mentioned Acts of Parliament, or in any other Act or Acts of Parliament, so far as the same relate to the Post Office ( and not repealed or altered by this Act ), shall continue in force, and shall be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend, to this present Act, as fully and effectually, to all Intents and Purposes, as if the fame had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in the Body of this present Act.

XIII. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates and Duties herein-before granted, together with such other Rates and Duties of the Revenue of the Post Office as shall be by Law payable and received after the said Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred and one, shall be paid from Time to Time into the Hands of the Receiver-General for the Time being of the Revenue of the Post Office, who shall pay ( the same the necessary Charges for collecting, paying, and accounting for the same being first deducted ) into the Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer on such Days and Times, and in such Manner, as the Rates and Duties hereby repealed were by any Law in force at and immediately before the passing of this Act directed to be paid, and the said Money so to be paid into the said Receipt as aforesaid shall be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund.

XIV. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That out of the Monies arising by the said Rates and Duties hereby imposed, and such other Rates and Duties of the Revenue of the Post Office as shall be by Law payable after the said Fifth Day of April, after setting apart quarterly the several Sums of One hundred and two thousand six hundred and thirty-nine Pounds, and of Ten thousand Pounds, in the Manner and for the Purposes directed by the said Act passed in the Thirty-seventh Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, the further Sum of Forty-nine thousand six hundred and two Pounds, being One-Fourth Part of the annual average Produce for Three Years, ending on the Fifth Day of April One thousand eight hundred, of the Remainder of the Rates and Duties granted by the said last-mentioned Act, and directed thereby to be set apart, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient, shall, according to the said last-mentioned Act, be set apart as an Addition made to the Publick Revenue for the Purposes therein-mentioned ; and after setting apart the several Sums above-mentioned, or so much as shall be sufficient, the Remainder of the said Revenue shall, during the Period of Ten Years after the passing of this Act, be entered in the Books in the Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer, distinctly and apart from all other Branches of the Publick Revenue ; and that the said Remainder of the said Rates to be set apart, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient, shall be deemed an Addition made to the Revenue, for the Purpose of defraying the encreased Charge occasioned by any Loan made, or Stock created or to be created, for the Service of Great Britain, by virtue of any Act or Acts passed or to be passed in this Session of Parliament ; and that there shall be provided and kept in the Office of the Auditor of the said Receipt, during the said Period of Ten Years, a Book or Books, in which the said Remainder of the said Revenue shall, together with the Monies arising from any other Duties granted or to be granted in this Session of Parliament, for the Purpose of defraying such encreased Charge as aforesaid, be entered separate and apart from all other Monies paid or payable to His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, upon any Account whatever.

XV. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall, at any Time or Times, be sued, molested, or prosecuted for any Thing by him, her, or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter, or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the special Matter in Evidence for his or their Defence ; and if, upon the Trial, a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him, her, or them, against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be altered, varied, or repealed by any Act or Acts to be made in this present Session of Parliament.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 42 George III, Cap. 101 - June 26, 1802

An Act for repealing the Rates and Duties of Postage upon Letters to and from France and the Batavian Republick from and to London, and for granting other Rates and Duties in lieu thereof ; and for exempting from the Duty of Tonnage the Ships and Vessels to be employed in conveying the Mails of Letters from France to the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.
[ 26th June 1802 ]

WHEREAS by an Act, passed in the ninth Year of the Reign of her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of the War, and other her Majesty’s Occasions, certain Rates of Postage were authorized to be taken for the Port of Letters and Packets from France unto London, and from the United Provinces unto London ; and by an Act of Parliament, passed in the forty-first Year of the Reign of his present Majesty, intituled, An Act for repealing the Rates and Duties of Postage in Great Britain, and granting other Rates and Duties in lieu thereof, and on Letters conveyed to or from any Part of the United Kingdom from or to any Place out of the said Kingdom, and by Packet Boats from or to the Ports of Holyhead and Milford Haven, certain additional Rates of Postage were granted for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to or from any Part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, from or to any Places out of the said Kingdom, not within his Majesty’s Dominions : And whereas it is expedient that the Rates of Postage upon Letters from France to London and from London to France, should be equalized, and that the Rates of Postage from the Batavian Republick to London and from London to the Batavian Republick, should also be equalized ; be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That the Rates of Postage now payable on the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to or from France and the Batavian Republick from or to London, shall, from and after the passing of this Act, cease and determine ; save and except in all Cases relating to the demanding, recovering, receiving, paying, or accounting for any Arrears thereof respectively, which may at the Time of the passing of this Act remain unpaid, or any Fine, Penalty, or Forfeiture respecting the same, which shall have been incurred at any Time before the passing of this Act.

II. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the pasting of this Act, it shall be lawful for his Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, to and for the Use of his Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take for the Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which shall be conveyed, carried, or sent by Post from London directed to any Part of France, and from any Part of France unto London, according to the several Rates and Sums herein-after mentioned, the same being rated by the Letter or by the Ounce ; ( that is to say, ) for every single Letter ten Pence, for every double Letter one Shilling and eight Pence, for every treble Letter two Shillings and six Pence, and for every Ounce in Weight three Shillings and four Pence ; and for the Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which shall be conveyed, carried, or sent Post from London, directed to any Part of the Batavian Republick, and from any Part of the Batavian Republick unto London, according to the several Rates and Sums herein-after mentioned, the same being rated by the Letter or by the Ounce ; ( that is to say, ) for every single Letter one Shilling, for every double Letter two Shillings, for every treble Letter three Shillings, and for every Ounce in Weight four Shillings.

III. And be it further enacted, That all the Monies to arise by the Rates aforesaid, except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Collection and Management of the same, shall be appropriated and applied to such and the same Uses to which the like present Rates of Postage are by Law appropriated and made applicable.

IV. And whereas an Act, passed in the present Session of Parliament, intituled, An Act for granting to his Majesty certain Duties on Goods imported into and exported from Great Britain, and on the Tonnage of Ships and Vessels entering Outwards or Inwards in any Port of Great Britain to or from Foreign Parts : And whereas it is expedient to exempt Ships and Vessels employed by the French Republick to convey the Mails of Letters between the two Countries from the Duties on Tonnage granted by the said Act on Ships and Vessels entering Inwards ; be it therefore further enacted, That, from and after the passing of this Act, so much of the said last recited Act as grants any Duties on the Tonnage of Ships and Vessels entering Inwards, shall be, and the same is hereby repealed as to all Ships and Vessels which now are or hereafter shall be employed by or under the Authority of the French Republick in conveying Mails of Letters from France to any Part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, whilst actually employed in conveying such Mails.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 45 George III, Cap. 11 - March 12, 1805

An Act for granting certain additional Rates and Duties in Great Britain, on the Conveyance of Letters.
[ 12th March 1805 ]

Most Gracious Sovereign,

WE, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in Parliament assembled, being desirous of raising the necessary Supplies to defray Your Majesty’s Public Expences, and of making a permanent Addition to the Public Revenue, have freely and voluntarily resolved to give and grant unto Your Majesty, the Additional Rates and Duties hereinafter mentioned ; and do therefore most humbly beseech Your Majesty that it may be enacted ; And be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the passing of this Act, it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for the Port and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets, which he shall carry, convey or send Post in Manner hereinafter mentioned, the additional Rates and Duties hereinafter specified, the same being rated by the Letter or by the Ounce ; videlicet,

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post within Great Britain, for every Single Letter One Penny ; for every Double Letter Two Pence ; for every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight Three Pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Four Pence ; and so on in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post from Great Britain to Ireland, and from Ireland to Great Britain, for every Single Letter One Penny ; for every Double Letter Two Pence ; for every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight Three Pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Four Pence ; and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of every Packet or Cover, containing therein, or having affixed thereto, One or more Paper or Papers with Patterns, or One or more Pattern or Patterns of Cloth, Silk, Stuff or other Goods, or One or more Sample or Samples of any other Sort of Thing, not exceeding together One Ounce in Weight, sent agreeably to the Provisions of an Act of Parliament, passed in the Twenty sixth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Second, intituled An Act for the more effectually preventing the fraudulent Removal of Tobacco by Land or Water, and for the Ease of the fair Trader in Tobacco ; and for ascertaining the Rates payable for the Postage of certain Letters ; and for amending and explaining the Laws relating to the Sale of Spirituous Liquors by Retail ; and of an Act, passed in the Thirty fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for further regulating the sending and receiving Letters free from the Duty of Postages ; for allowing Noncommissioned Officers, Seamen and Private Men in the Army and Navy, whilst on Service, to send and receive Letters at a low Rate of Postage ; and for permitting Patterns and Samples of Goods to be transmitted by the Post at an easier Rate than is now allowed by Law ; the Sum of One Penny.

For the Port and Conveyance of every Letter, originally sent by the Post, now known by the Name of The Two Penny Post, and not first passing and afterwards to pass by the General Post, directed to or sent from Places beyond the Delivery of the General Post Letter Carriers, the Sum of One Penny :For the Port and Conveyance of every Letter, originally passing by the General Post, directed to Places beyond the Delivery of the General Post, and afterwards delivered by the Two Penny Post, the Sum of Two Pence :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post, from and to Great Britain to and from Parts beyond the Seas, not within His Majesty’s Dominions, for every Single Letter Two Pence ; for every Double Letter Four Pence ; for every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight Six Pence ; and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight Eight Pence ; and so on in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters sent by the Post from and to Great Britain to and from the British Dominions in America, to and from or passing through the Kingdom of Portugal, and to and from the Islands of Guernsey and Jersey and the Isle of Man, a Packet Postage for every Single Letter of One Penny ; for every Double Letter Two Pence ; for every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight Three Pence ; and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight Four Pence ; and so on in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce.

II. And be it further enacted, That over and above the Rates and Duties by this Act granted, all Letters and Packets passing from Great Britain to the British Dominions in America, to or through the Kingdom of Portugal, to the Islands of Guernsey and Jersey and the Isle of Man, and all Letters and Packets from those respective Countries to Great Britain, shall be charged with the Inland Rate of Postage hereby established, of One Penny for each Single Letter, and so in Proportion for Double and Treble Letters, and other Letters according to the Weight thereof, for their Inland Conveyance.

III. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall increase or alter, or be construed to increase or alter, the Amount or Manner of charging the Rates of Postage upon Single Letters to be sent by the Post by or to Seamen or Privates employed in His Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery or Marines, upon their own private Concerns only, whilst such Seamen and Privates shall be employed in the Public Service as aforesaid, made payable by the said Act passed in the Thirty fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, any thing hereinbefore contained to the contrary in anywise notwithstanding.

IV. Provided always, and be it enacted, That all printed Newspapers sent by the Post now known by the Name of the Two Penny Post, to Places beyond the Delivery of the General Post, shall be chargeable with a Duty of One Penny only ; provided such Newspapers be sent in the Manner prescribed by an Act, passed in the Forty second Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, any Law to the contrary notwithstanding.

V. And be it further enacted, That all the Powers, Provisions, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, Forfeitures and Distribution thereof, and all Clauses and other Matters and Things, contained in any Act or Acts of Parliament in force at the Time of passing this Act, relating to the Post Office, or any Rates or Duties payable on the Port or Conveyance of Letters or Packets, ( and not repealed or altered by this Act ), shall so far as the same are applicable, continue in force, and be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this present Act, and to the Rates and Duties hereby granted, as fully and effectually, to all Intents and Purposes, as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in the Body of this Act.

VI. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates and Duties hereinbefore granted, shall be paid from time to time into the Hands of the Receiver General for the time being of the Revenue of the Post Office, who shall pay the same ( the necessary Charges for collecting, paying and accounting for the same being first deducted ) into the Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer, on such Days and Times and in such Manner as the present Rates and Duties are directed by Law to be paid ; and the said Duties so to be paid into the said Receipt as aforesaid, shall be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of Great Britain.

VII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That all the Monies arising and to arise by the said Rates and Duties, or any of them, shall be deemed an addition made to the Revenue, for the Purpose of defraying the increased Charge occasioned by any Loan made, or Stock created or to be created, by virtue of any Act or Acts passed or to be passed in this Session of Parliament ; and that the said Monies shall, during the Space of Ten Years next ensuing, be paid into the Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer at Westminster, distinctly and apart from all other Branches of the public Revenues ; and that there shall be provided and kept in the Office of the Auditor of the said Receipt, during the said Period of Ten Years, a Book or Books in which all the Monies arising from the said Rates and Duties, and paid into the said Receipt, shall, together with the Monies arising from any Rates and Duties granted in this Session of Parliament, for the Purposes of defraying such increased Charge as aforesaid, be entered separate and apart from all other Monies paid or payable to His Majesty, His Heirs or Successors, upon any Account whatever.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall at any time or times be sued, molested or prosecuted for any thing by him, her or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the special Matter in Evidence, for his, her or their Defence ; and if upon the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him, her or them, against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.

IX. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be altered, varied or repealed, by any Act or Acts to be made in this present Session of Parliament.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 45 George III, Cap. 21 - March 25, 1805

An Act for repealing certain Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland, and granting other Duties in lieu thereof.
[ 25th March 1805 ]

WHEREAS by an Act, made in the Forty third Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Rates and Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland, certain Duties of Postage were imposed within Ireland ; and it is expedient that the said Rates and Duties ( except as hereinafter mentioned ) should cease and determine, and other Rates and Duties be granted in lieu thereof : May it therefore please Your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the Expiration of Ten Days after the passing of this Act, the Rates and Duties for the Postage and Conveyance of Letters and Packets sent by the Post in Ireland, granted by the said recited Act, ( except the Rates and Duties by the said Act granted on Letters and Packets conveyed by the Penny Post in Ireland ) shall cease and determine ; and that from and after the Expiration of Ten Days after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster or Postmasters General of Ireland for the time being, and his or their Deputy or Deputies, Servants and Agents, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for the Portage and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which he or they shall convey, carry or send Post to and from Places within Ireland, according to the several Rates and Sums of Money, Irish Currency, hereinafter mentioned ; that is to say,

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter or Piece of Paper from the Office in Ireland, where such Letter or Piece of Paper shall be put in, to any Distance within the same, not exceeding Fifteen Miles, Irish Measure, the Sum of Three Pence ; and to any Distance exceeding Fifteen Miles, and not exceeding Thirty Miles, the Sum of Four Pence ; and to any Distance exceeding Thirty Miles, and not exceeding Fifty Miles, the Sum of Five Pence ; and to any Distance exceeding Fifty Miles, and not exceeding Eighty Miles, the Sum of Sixpence ; and to any Distance exceeding Eighty Miles, the Sum of Seven Pence :

And for the Port or Conveyance of every Double Letter, double the said Sums respectively ; and for every Treble Letter, treble the said Sums respectively ; and for every Ounce Weight, Four Times the said Sums respectively ; and so in Proportion for any greater Weight than One Ounce, reckoning every Quarter of an Ounce equal to a Single Letter :

And that all Letters and Packets directed from any Place in Ireland to any Part or Parts in Great Britain or beyond the Seas, or received in Ireland from Great Britain or any Part or Parts beyond the Seas, shall be charged and pay for their Portage and Conveyance within Ireland, from or to Dublin, Waterford or Donaghadee, or any other Port where Packet Boats for the Conveyance of Letters to and from Ireland are or may be established, as they shall respectively be shipped from or landed in any of the said Places according to the Rates aforesaid :

And that every Letter or Packet passing through the General Post Office in the City of Dublin, from any Place within Ireland not less distant than Four Miles from the General Post Office in the said City, to any Place within Ireland not less distant than Four Miles from the General Post Office in the said City, shall be charged and pay according to the Distances hereinbefore mentioned to Dublin, and be further charged and pay according to the said Rates from Dublin :

And that for every Letter or Packet directed on board, or brought or sent from on board any Ship or Vessel riding or stopping in any Port within Ireland, there shall be charged and paid to His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, over and above the Rates aforesaid, the Sum of One Penny.

II. And be it further enacted, That the said Rates and Duties hereby granted shall be raised, levied, collected, managed, recovered and applied under such and the like Powers and Authorities, Rules, Regulations and Restrictions, Penalties and Forfeitures, and subject to the like Provisions, Exemptions and Exceptions, and Privileges, as are mentioned, expressed and contained in the said recited Act of the Forty third Year aforesaid, or in any other Act or Acts in force in Ireland relating to the Rates and Duties on Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland ; and that all and every the Clauses, Matters and Things, in the said recited Act of the Forty third Year aforesaid, mentioned, expressed and contained, or in any other Act or Acts in force in Ireland, relating to such Rates and Duties, shall be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this present Act, as fully and effectually, to all Intents and Purposes, as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in this present Act ; save only so far as respects the Amount of the Duties under the said Acts, or any of them.

III. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be altered, amended or repealed, by any Act or Acts to be made in this present Session of Parliament.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 46 George III, Cap. 73 - July 3, 1806

An Act for the better Regulation of the Office of Receiver General of the Stamp Duties in England.
[ 3d July 1806 ]

WHEREAS it is expedient that Regulations should be established by Law, for depositing all the Monies, Bills and Drafts received on Account of the Revenue under the Management of the Commissioners of Stamps, except as hereinafter is mentioned, in the Bank of England, until the same shall be paid into the Exchequer, as now required by Law ; Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That, from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and six, all Sums of Money, Bills, Drafts and Notes, which shall be received by the Receiver General of the Duties under the Management of the Commissioners Stamps, shall be paid by him into the Hands of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England ; that is to say, the Money and Notes and such of the Bills and Drafts as shall be already accepted, or not require Acceptance, on the Day after the same shall be received, and such of the Bills and Drafts as shall require Acceptance, and not be already accepted when received, on the Day after the same shall be accepted ; and all such Monies, Bills, Drafts and Notes shall be placed to an Account to be raised in the Books of the said Governor and Company, and to be entitled ” The Account of the Public Monies of the Receiver General of the Stamp Duties,” inserting the Name of such Receiver General for the time being.

II. Provided nevertheless, and be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the said Receiver General from time to time to retain in his Hands, out of the Monies received by him as such Receiver General, such Sums of Money not exceeding the Sum of One thousand Pounds in each Week, unless any larger Sum shall be allowed in Writing by any Three or more of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, as the Commissioners of Stamps shall from time to time direct, for the Payment of casual and ordinary Charges and Expences, payable out of the Revenue under the Management of the Commissioners of Stamps.

III. And be it further enacted, That the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, or some Person duly authorized by them in that Behalf, shall daily upon receiving any Money, Bills, Drafts or Notes from the Receiver General of Stamps, make an Entry of the Money, Bills, Drafts and Notes so received, in a Book to be provided for that Purpose, which Book shall be forthwith returned to the Stamp Office, and inspected daily after its Return by the Comptroller and Accountant General, or Deputy Comptroller and Accountant General of the Stamp Duties, who shall compare the same with the Books kept by him, for the Purpose of seeing that the Receiver General constantly pays into the Bank all the Money, Bills, Drafts and Notes, which he ought to do under the Provisions of this Act ; and any Default which such Comptroller and Accountant General, or Deputy Comptroller and Accountant General, may discover in that Behalf, shall be immediately reported to the Commissioners of Stamps, who shall report the same, unless the same shall appear to them to have happened by Mistake or Inadvertence, to the Lords Commissioners of the Treasury.

IV. And be it further enacted, That the Weekly Payments into the Exchequer pursuant to Law, of the Monies arising from the Duties under the Management of the Commissioners of Stamps, shall be made in Manner following ; ( that is to say, ) the said Receiver General, or One of his Clerks, to be deputed and authorized by Him for that Purpose, shall make an Order upon the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, to write off from his Account the Sum desired, which Order shall be countersigned in such Manner as the Lords of the Treasury shall direct, and the said Governor and Company, or some Person duly authorized in that Behalf, shall upon Receipt of such Order write off the Sum therein mentioned accordingly, and deliver a Note for the Amount ( which for greater Security shall be cancelled ) to the Bearer of such Order, who shall pay the same into the Exchequer, and the Bank Clerks, attending there to receive Monies paid into the Exchequer, shall receive such Note as so much Cash.

V. And be it further enacted, That for the Payment of Salaries, Incidents and other Charges and Expences, payable out of the Revenue under the Management of the Commissioners of Stamps, ( and which the Money to be retained by the said Receiver General as before directed may be insufficient to pay, ) it shall be lawful for the said Receiver General, or One of his Clerks, to be deputed and authorized by him for that Purpose, to draw out of the Bank of England, as Occasion may require, such Sum or Sums of Money as the Commissioners of Stamps shall from time to time allow and direct in that Behalf ; and that every Draft or Order on the Bank for Money for any of the last mentioned Purposes, shall be countersigned in such Manner as the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury shall direct, and shall specify the Head of Service for which the same shall be issued ; and the said Receiver General shall from time to time account for the Monies so to be drawn by him or his Clerk out of the Bank, as well as for the Monies so to be retained by him as aforesaid, and for the Application thereof respectively, in such Manner as the Commissioners of Stamps, with the Approbation of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, shall direct.

VI. And be it further enacted, That all Drafts drawn pursuant to any of the Directions of this Act, but not otherwise, shall be sufficient Authority to the Bank of England to pay the Amount thereof to the Persons mentioned in such Drafts or to the Bearer of them.

VII. And be it further enacted, That upon the Death, Resignation or Removal of the present and of every other Receiver General of Stamp Duties hereafter to be appointed, the Balance of Cash for which he shall at that Time have Credit on his Account as Receiver General with the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, shall as soon as a Successor shall be appointed to the said Office, actually vest in such Successor in Trust for the Service of the Public, and be forthwith transferred, carried over and placed to the Account of such Successor, to be applied to the said Service in pursuance of the like Drafts and Orders as aforesaid ; and the Receiver General for the time being shall and he is hereby directed and required to issue his Drafts and Orders as aforesaid, for all unsatisfied Charges and Demands payable out of the aforesaid Revenue, although the same shall have accrued in the Time of any former Receiver General.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That from and after Fourteen Days after the passing of this Act, the Receiver General of the Stamp Duties for the time being shall keep the Account with the Bank of all Monies issued by and paid to the Bank on his Account for the Service of the Public ; and the said Receiver General, observing the Rules and Regulations hereby prescribed, shall not be answerable for any Money, Bills, Drafts or Notes, which he shall have so paid into the Bank of England ; and the Governor and Company of the Bank of England shall be answerable for all the Monies, Bills, Drafts or Notes, which shall be actually received by them as aforesaid from the Receiver General of the Stamp Duties.

IX. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall knowingly and wilfully forge or counterfeit, or cause or procure to be forged or counterfeited, or knowingly and wilfully act or assist in forging or counterfeiting the Name or Hand Writing of the Receiver General of the Stamp Duties for the time being, or of his Clerk, or of either of the Commissioners of Stamps, to any Draft, Instrument or Writing whatsoever, for or in order to the receiving or obtaining any of the Money in the Hands or Custody of the Governor and Company of the Bank of England, on Account of the Receiver General of the Stamp Duties, or shall forge or counterfeit, or cause or procure to be forged or counterfeited, or knowingly and wilfully act or assist in the forging or counterfeiting any Draft, Instrument or Writing in Form of a Draft, made by such Receiver General or his Clerk, or shall utter or publish any such, knowing the same to be forged or counterfeited, with Intention to defraud any Person whomsoever, every such Person or Persons so offending, being thereof lawfully convicted, shall be and is and are hereby declared and adjudged to be guilty of Felony, and shall suffer Death as a Felon without Benefit of Clergy.

X. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be altered, varied or repealed by any Act to be made in this present Session of Parliament Receiver General.

[ Receiver General of Stamp Duties to pay into Exchequer in the Manner directed by this Act, in respect of Payments into the Bank, 59 G.3. c.39. ]
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 48 George III, Cap. 116 - June 30, 1808

An Act for granting to His Majesty Rates of Postage on the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to and from the Island of Madeira, and to and from the Portuguese Territories on the Continent of South America.
[ 30th June 1808 ]

WHEREAS it may be expedient for the Benefit of Commerce and Correspondence to establish One or more Packet Boats between the Port of Falmouth, in the County of Cornwall, or such other Port in this Kingdom, as His Majesty’s Post-master General shall appoint, and the Island of Madeira and Brazil, or other of the Territories and Possessions of the Crown of Portugal on the Continent of South America, in lieu of the Packet Boats lately employed between Great Britain and the Kingdom of Portugal : Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the Establishment of Packet Boats between this Kingdom and the Island of Madeira, and between any of the Portuguese Territories on the Continent of South America, it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Post-master General and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats or to the Port of Falmouth aforesaid, or from or to any other convenient Port in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, to or from the Island of Madeira, and to or from Brazil, or any of the Territories and Possessions of the Crown of Portugal, on the Continent of South America, over and above all other Rates payable for Conveyance of such Letters and Packets within the said United Kingdom, a Packet Postage according to the Rates and Sums in Sterling Money herein after mentioned ; that is to say,

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter to or from the Island of Madeira, the Sum of One Shilling and Sixpence :

For every Double Letter Three Shillings :

For every Treble Letter Four Shillings and Sixpence :

And for every Ounce Six Shillings ; and so in proportion for every Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

And for the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter to or from Brazil, or any other the Territories and Possessions of the Crown of Portugal on the Continent of South America, the Sum of Two Shillings and Five-pence :

For every Double Letter Four Shillings and Ten pence :

For every Treble Letter Seven Shillings and Three pence :

And for every Ounce Nine Shillings and Eight-pence ; and so in proportion for every Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce.

II. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Establishment of Packet Boats for the Purposes aforesaid, all and every the Clauses, Provisions, Powers, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, and Methods for Recovery of the same, and all other Matters and Things contained in any Act or Acts of Parliament relating to the Post Office, shall extend and be deemed and construed to extend to Letters and Packets to be conveyed between the said United Kingdom and the Island of Madeira, and other the said Territories and Possessions of the Crown of Portugal.

” Money arising by the Rates shall be carried to the Consolidated Fund. #3. General Issue – Treble Costs. #4. “
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 50 George III, Cap. 74 - June 15, 1810

An Act to grant to His Majesty certain additional Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland.
[ 15th June 1810. ]

Most Gracious Sovereign,
WE Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland in Parliament assembled, being desirous of raising the necessary Supplies to defray your Majesty’s Publick Expences, and of making a permanent Addition to the Publick Revenue of Ireland, have freely and voluntarily resolved to give and grant unto your Majesty the Rates and Duties hereinafter mentioned ; And do therefore most humbly beseech your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the Expiration of Ten Days after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster or Postmasters General of Ireland for the time being, and his or their Deputy or Deputies, Servants and Agents, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to have, demand, receive and take for the Portage and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which he or they shall convey, carry or send Post to and from Places within Ireland, the additional Rates and Duties hereinafter specified, the same being rated by the Letter or by the Ounce ; ( that is to say ) for the Port and Conveyance of every single Letter or Piece of Paper from the Office in Ireland, where such Letter or Piece of Paper shall be put in, to any Distance within Ireland, the Sum of One Penny, for every Double Letter Two pence, for every Treble Letter Three pence, and for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight Four pence, and so in proportion for any greater Weight than One Ounce, reckoning every Quarter of an Ounce equal to a Single Letter ; and that all Letters and Packets directed from any Place in Ireland, to any Part or Parts in Great Britain or beyond the Seas, or received in Ireland from Great Britain or any Part or Parts beyond the Seas, shall be charged and pay for their Portage and Conveyance within Ireland, from or to Dublin, Waterford, Donaghadee, or any other Port where Packet Boats for the Conveyance of Letters to and from Ireland are or may be established, as they shall respectively be shipped from or landed in any of the said Places, according to the Additional Rates aforesaid ; and that every Letter or Packet passing through the General Post Office in the City of Dublin, from any Place within Ireland not less distant than Four Miles from the General Post Office in the said City, to any Place within Ireland not less distant than Four Miles from the General Post Office in the said City, shall be charged and pay according to the said Additional Rates to Dublin, and be further charged and pay according to the said Additional Rates from Dublin ; all which Rates and Duties shall be over and above the Duties of Postage payable on any such Letters and Packets under any Act or Acts in force in Ireland at the time of passing of Act.

II. And be it enacted, That from and after the Expiration of Ten Days after the passing of this Act, so much of an Act made in the Forty third Year of His present Majesty’s Reign, for granting Rates and Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland, as relates to the Mode of folding printed Newspapers sent by the Post free of the Duty of Postage, and as provides that no Newspapers printed in Ireland shall pass free of Postage, unless such Newspapers shall be put into the Post Offices of the Cities and Towns where or in which such Newspapers be printed, Two Hours at least before the time of the Post being dispatched therefrom, shall be and the same is and are hereby repealed.

III. And be it further enacted, That the said Rates and Duties hereby granted shall be paid and payable in Irish Currency, and shall be raised, levied, collected, managed, recovered and applied, under such and the like Powers and Authorities, Rules, Regulations and Restrictions, Penalties and Forfeitures, and subject to the like Provisions, Exemptions and Exceptions, and Privileges as are mentioned, expressed and contained in an Act made in the Forty third Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled, An Act for granting to His Majesty certain Rates and Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland, or in any other Act or Acts in force in Ireland relating to the Rates and Duties on Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland ; and that all and every the Clauses, Matters and Things, in the said recited Act of the Forty third Year aforesaid, mentioned, expressed and contained, or in any other Act or Acts in force in Ireland relating to such Rates and Duties, shall be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this present Act, as fully and effectually, to all Intents and Purposes, as if the same had been repeated and re-enacted in this present Act, save only so far as respects the Amount of Duties under the said Acts or any of them, and save and except so far as the said Acts or any of them are altered or repealed by this Act.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 52 George III, Cap. 88 - July 9, 1812

An Act for granting to His Majesty certain additional Rates of Postage in Great Britain.
[ 9th July 1812 ]

Most Gracious Sovereign,

WE, Your Majesty’s most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, in Parliament assembled, being desirous of raising the necessary Supplies to defray Your Majesty’s Public Expences, and of making a permanent Addition to the Public Revenue, have freely and voluntarily resolved to give and grant unto Your Majesty the additional Rates and Duties hereinafter mentioned, and do therefore most humbly beseech Your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same,
That, from and after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for the Port and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which he shall carry, convey or send Post, in manner hereinafter mentioned, the additional Rates and Duties hereinafter specified, the same being rated by the Letter or by the Ounce ; that is to say,

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post within Great Britain, above the Distance of Twenty Miles from the Office where such Letters may be put in, to the Office where the same may be directed,
For every Single Letter, One Penny :
For every Double Letter, Two pence :
For every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Three pence :

And for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Four pence, and so in Proportion for ever other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post to and from Ireland,
For every Single Letter, One Penny :
For every Double Letter, Two pence :
For every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Three pence :

And for every Ounce in Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Four pence, and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

For the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post to and from His Majesty’s Dominions and Plantations in America,

For every Single Letter an additional Rate of Two pence :
For every Double Letter, Four pence :
For every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Six pence :
And for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Eight pence, and so in Proportion for every other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce :

And for the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post to and from Parts beyond the Seas, whether within His Majesty’s Dominions or not within His Majesty’s Dominions,

For every Single Letter, an additional Rate of Two pence :
For every Double Letter, Four pence :
For every Treble Letter or other Letter under an Ounce in Weight, Six pence :
And for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight, Eight pence, and so in Proportion for every other Letter of greater Weight than an Ounce.

II. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall extend or be construed to extend the said additional Rates of Postage to Letters to be sent by the Post to and from the Islands of Guernsey, Jersey and the Isle of Man, ( except the Rates payable for Conveyance within Great Britain ) any thing herein contained to the contrary notwithstanding : And for the Port and Conveyance by the Post of every Letter, Packet or Cover containing Patterns of Cloth, Silk, Stuff or Samples of other Goods or other Sort of Thing, not exceeding One Ounce in Weight, if the same Letter or Packet or Cover shall be closed or not open at the Sides, an additional Rate of Two pence for every such Letter, Packet or Cover : And for the Port and Conveyance by the Post of every Letter or Cover containing One or more Paper or Papers with Patterns, or containing one or more Pattern or Patterns of Cloth, Silk or Stuff, or One or more Sample or Samples of any other Sort of Goods, or One or more Piece or Pieces of any other Sort of Thing inclosed therein or affixed thereto though not on Paper, if the same do weigh One Ounce, an additional Rate of One Penny for every such Letter, so as every such Letter, Packet or Cover shall be sent open at the Sides and without any Letter or Writing in, upon, or with such Packet or Cover other than the Name or Names of the Person or Persons sending the same, and the Place or Places of his, her their Abode, and the Prices of the Articles contained therein or affixed thereto.

III. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall increase or alter, or be construed to increase or alter the Amount or manner of charging the Rates of Postage upon Single Letters to be sent by the Post by or to Seamen or Privates employed in His Majesty’s Navy, Army, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery or Marines upon their own private Concerns only with such Seamen and Privates shall be employed in the Public Service, made payable by an Act passed in the Thirty fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for further regulating the sending and receiving Letters free from the Duty of Postage ; for allowing Non Commissioned Officers, Seamen and private Men in the Navy and Army whilst on Service to send and receive Letters at a low Rate of Postage ; and for permitting Patterns and Samples of Goods to be transmitted by the Post at an easier Rate than is now allowed by Law ; any thing hereinbefore contained to the contrary in any wise notwithstanding.

IV. And be it further enacted, That all the Powers, Provisions, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, Forfeitures and Distribution thereof and all Clauses and other Matters and Things contained in any Act or Acts of Parliament in force at the time pasting this Act, relating to the Post Office, or any Rates or Duties payable on the Port or Conveyance of Letters or Packets ( and not repealed or altered by this Act ), shall, so far as the same are applicable, continue in force, and be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this present Act, and to the Rates and Duties hereby granted, as fully and effectually to all Intents and Purposes as if the fame had been particularly repeated and reenacted in the Body of this Act.

V. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates and Duties hereinbefore granted shall be paid from time to time into the Hands of the Receiver General for the time being of the Revenue of the Post Office, who shall pay the same ( the necessary Charges for collecting, paying and accounting for the same being first deducted ) into the Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer, on such Days and Times, and in such manner as the present Rates and Duties are directed by Law to be paid, and the said Duties so to be paid into the said Receipt as aforesaid shall be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of Great Britain.

VI. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That all the Monies arising and to arise by the said Rates and Duties, or any ot them, shall be deemed an Addition made to the Revenue for the Purpose of defraying the increased Charges occasioned by any Loan made or to be made, or Stock created or to be created by virtue of any Act or Acts passed or to be passed in this Session of Parliament.

VII. Provided always, and be it enacted, That the Commissioners Of His Majesty’s Treasury now or for the time being, or any Three or more of them, or the Lord High Treasurer for the time being, shall for the Period of Ten Years from the Commencement of this Act cause a separate and distinct Account of the additional Duties granted by this Act to be prepared and annually laid before Parliament, pursuant to an Act passed In the Forty second Year of the Reign of His present Majesty. intituled An Act for directing certain Public Accounts to be laid annually before Parliament, and for discontinuing certain other Forms of Account now in use ; and the Monies arising from the said additional Duties shall be deemed a permanent Increase to the Public Revenue of Great Britain, for the Purpose of defraying any increased. Charge occasioned by any Loan made or created, by Authority of any Act of Parliament passed or to be passed in the present Session of Parliament.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall at any time of times be sued, molested or prosecuted for any by him, her or them done or executed in pursuance of this or of any Clause, Matter or Thing herein contained, such Person or Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the Special Matter in Evidence for his, her or their Defence ; and if the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants hall have Treble Costs to him, her or them against any such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.

IX. And be it further enacted, That this Act maybe altered, or repealed by any Act or Acts to be made in this present Session of Parliament.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 53 George III, Cap. 68 - June 3, 1813

An Act to repeal the Exemption from Toll granted for or in respect of Carriages with more than Two Wheels, carrying the Mail in Scotland ; and for granting a Rate for Postage, as an Indemnity for the Loss which may arise to the Revenue of the Post Office from the Payment of such Tolls.
[ 3d June 1813 ]

WHEREAS by an Act passed in the Twenty fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act to exempt Carriages carrying the Mail from paying Tolls at any Turnpike Gate in Great Britain, it was enacted, That, from and after the Fifteenth Day of July One thousand seven hundred and eighty five, all Carriages of what Description soever, or Horses which should be employed in conveying from one Part of the Kingdom to another the Mail or Packet which should be made up under the Authority or Direction of His Majesty’s Postmaster General or his Deputy or Deputies, should be and the same were thereby exempted, freed and discharged from the Payment of any Tolls whatsoever that should or might be demanded for the Passage of Carriages or Horses through any Turnpike, Toll Gate, or Bar at which any Toll was collected by any Art or Acts of Parliament then in force : And whereas a similiar Exemption has been granted by all or most of the Acts of Parliament which have been passed, since the said recited Act, for making and maintaining any Turnpike Road or Bridge, or for altering or enlarging the Powers of such Acts of Parliament ; but which Exemption ought to cease and determine in that Part of Great Britain called Scotland, in so far as regards Carriages with more than Two Wheels, or any Horse or Horses drawing the same : May it therefore please Your Majesty that it may be exacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That, from and after the passing of this Act, the said recited Act passed in the Twenty fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty shall be and the same is hereby repealed, in so far only as the same applies to Scotland, and save and except in regard to Carriages with Two Wheels conveying only the said Mail or Packet, with their Driver, and any Horse or Horses drawing the same, and any Horse, not drawing, employed in conveying the said Mail or Packet, which shall continue exempted from the Payment of any Tolls or Duties ; any thing in this Act to the contrary notwithstanding.

II. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the passing of this Act, every Exemption granted by any Act or Acts of Parliament which shall be in force in Scotland at the passing of this Act, whereby any Carriages or Horses drawing the same, which shall be employed in conveying from one Part of the Kingdom to another the Mail or Packet which shall be made up under the Authority and Direction of His Majesty’s Postmaster General, or his Deputy or Deputies, are exempted, freed and discharged from the Payment of the Tolls or Duties thereby granted, shall be and the same is hereby repealed ; and such and the like Tolls and Duties shall thenceforth be paid and payable for and in respect of such Carriages or Horses carrying the said Mail or Packet in Scotland, as are and shall be paid and payable for or in respect of Carriages or Horses of the like Description, not carrying such Mail or Packet, passing through any Turnpike Gate in Scotland.

III. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That Carriages with Two Wheels, conveying only the said Mail or Packet, with their Driver, and any Horse or Horses drawing the same, and any Horse, not drawing, employed in conveying the said Mail or Packet, shall continue exempted from the Payment of any such Tolls or Duties ; any thing in this Act to the contrary notwithstanding.

IV. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That no such Carriages or Horses carrying the said Mail or Packet shall be stopped at any Turnpike Gate or Bar in Scotland for Payment of the Tolls or Duties payable for or in respect of such Carriages or Horses ; nor shall such Tolls or Duties be let to farm, but the same shall be paid out of the Revenue of the Post Office in Scotland, at such time and in such manner as may be settled and agreed upon by and between the several Trustees entitled to demand or receive the same, and the Deputy in Scotland to His Majesty’s Postmaster General, in such manner as that Payment may be made, at least Once in every Three Calendar Months : Provided nevertheless, that whenever such an Agreement shall not be made, or being made shall not be performed, then the several Tolls or Duties leviable for or in respect of any such Carriages or Horses carrying the said Mail or Packet, shall and may be recovered, in the Name of the Treasurer or Clerks of the respective Trusts, in the Court of Session or the Court of Exchequer in Scotland, by summary Application, against the Deputy in Scotland to His Majesty’s Postmaster General.

V. And be it further enacted, That if any Keeper of any Toll Bar, or any other Person, shall wilfully obstruct or delay any Carriage or Horse conveying the said Mail or Packet at or in passing any Turnpike Gate, every Person so offending shall, for every such Offence, forfeit and pay a Sum not exceeding Five Pounds Sterling, to be recovered within Three Calendar Months thereafter, on Proof upon Oath of the Offence either by the voluntary Confession of the Party or by the Oath of One or more credible Witness or Witnesses before any Justice of the Peace of the County or Stewartry or Place where the Offence shall be committed, or where the Offender shall be or reside, to be levied by Distress and Sale of the Offender’s Goods and Effects under the Hand of such Justice, rendering the Overplus ( if any ) after deducting the Charges of such Distress and Sale, to the Person whose Goods and Effects shall have been so distrained or sold ; and for want of sufficient Distress, such Justice is hereby required to commit such Offender to the Common Gaol of the County, Stewartry or Place where the Offence shall have been committed, for any time not exceeding Two Calendar Months, and every such Penalty shall and may be levied to the Use of the Person or Persons suing for the same.

VI. And, in order to make up any Loss which may arise to the Revenue of the Post Office from the Payment of the Tolls and Duty hereby directed to be made by the Deputy in Scotland, to His Majesty’s Postmaster General, to the several Trustees entitled to demand and receive the same, be it therefore enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, from and after the passing of this Act, to demand, have, receive and take for the Post and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which he shall convey, carry or send Post, in or by any Mail Coach or Carriage with more than Two Wheels, to or from any Place within Scotland, or from any Place within England and Ireland, or from any Parts beyond the Seas to any Place within Scotland, or from any Place within Scotland to any Place in England or Ireland, or from any Parts beyond the Seas, in addition to all other Rates and Duties now payable for the Conveyance by the Post of such Letters and Packets, the Sum of One Halfpenny for each Letter and Packet.

VII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That the Rates and Duties hereby granted shall not be payable for Letters conveyed by the Post in Scotland upon Roads where Mail Coaches are not now established in Scotland ; but in case Mail Coaches shall at any future time be established on such Roads, the like Rate of Postage of One Halfpenny a Letter shall from thenceforth be payable in like manner as the present additional Rate of One Halfpenny is hereby made payable.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That the Duties hereby granted shall from time to time be paid into the Hands of the Receiver General for the time being of the Revenue of the Post Office, who shall pay the same ( the necessary Charges of collecting, paying, and accounting for the same being first deducted ) into the Receipt of the Exchequer, and shall be appropriated and applied to such and the same Uses as the present Rates and Duties of Postage are by Law applicable.

IX. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons hall at any time be sued, molested, or prosecuted for any thing by him, her or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may, in the Court of Exchequer in Scotland, plead the General Issue, and give the Special Matter in Evidence for his, her or their Defence ; and if upon the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him, her or them against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs ; and in every such Action or Process brought before the Court of Session in Scotland, the Defendant or Defendants shall and may deny the Libel, and give this Act and the Special Matter in Evidence, and that the same was done in pursuance of and by the Authority of this Act ; and if the same shall appear to have been so done, or if such Action or Process shall be found irrelevant, or be otherwise dismissed, or the Pursuer or Pursuers shall not prosecute the Action or Process, or suffer the same to fall asleep ; or if the Judgment shall be given against the Pursuer or Pursuers, the Defender or Defenders shall have Treble Costs, and shall have such Remedy for recovering the same as any Defender or Defenders hath or have for Costs in any other cafes of Law in Scotland.

X. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be varied, altered or repealed, by any Act to be passed in this present Session of Parliament.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 54 George III, Cap. 169 - July 30, 1814

An Act for making certain Regulations respecting the Postage of Ship Letters and of Letters in Great Britain.
[ 30th July 1814 ]

WHEREAS it is expedient to alter and enlarge the Powers of an Act passed in the thirty ninth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for the more secure Conveyance of Ship Letters, and for granting to His Majesty certain Rates of Postage thereon ; and to grant other Rates of Postage in lieu of some of the Rates therein mentioned ;
Be it therefore enacted by The King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That, from and after the Tenth Day of October One thousand eight hundred and fourteen, so much of the said recited Act as grants a Rate of Postage of Four pence for every Single Letter, and so in Proportion for Packets in Addition to any Inland Postage which may arise upon the Inland Conveyance of such Letters and Packets, for Letters and Packets brought by Ships and Vessels other than Packet Boats from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions, and from Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas into Great Britain, shall be and the same is hereby repealed, except so far as relates to the Rates imposed by the said Act, which may be then remaining unpaid.

II. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for every Letter and Packet which shall be brought by Ships and Vessels, other than Packet Boats, in the manner in the said recited Act mentioned from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions, and from Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas into Great Britain, the Sum of Six pence for every Single Letter and so in Proportion for Packets, in addition to any Inland or Internal Postage which may arise upon the Inland Conveyance of such Letters and Packets.

III. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General and his Deputies to receive Letters and Packets directed to Places within His Majesty’s Dominions and to Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, from any Person or Persons who may bring the same to any Post Office in Great Britain, and who may be desirous to forward such Letters themselves, and to affix upon each Letter or Packet such Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation as the Postmaster General in his Discretion shall think proper and order, and thereupon to demand and receive for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, a Rate of Postage of One third Part of the Rates and Duties payable by Law for such respective Letters and Packets if the same were conveyed by Packet Boats, and in cases were no Rate of Postage is already established, then to demand, have, receive and take for such Letters and Packets, Rates as near as can be ascertained equal to One third Part of what is now paid for Letters sent beyond the Seas, and upon Payment thereof to return such Letters and Packets to the Person or Persons bringing the same, and that it shall and may be lawful for such Person and Persons to forward such Letters and Packets to the Places to which they may be directed by any Ships or Vessels that he or they may think proper, not being Packet Boats without incurring any Penalty therefore, and without Payment of any other Rate or Duty of Postage ; any Law, Statute, Custom or Usage to the contrary notwithstanding.

IV. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, by writing under his Hand, and under Seal of the Office of Postmaster General, to license and authorize any Person or Persons whatsoever to collect Letters and Packets in Great Britain directed to Places within His Majesty’s Dominions, and to Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, for the Purpose of being forwarded according to their Directions by any Ships or Vessels, other than Packet Boats, provided that such Persons so to be licensed shall previous to forwarding the same bring such Letters and Packets to the Post Office of the Town or Place to have a Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation put thereon, which Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation, the Postmaster General and his Deputies are hereby authorized and required to put thereon, and to demand, receive and take, for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, the same Rates of Postage as are hereby made payable for Letters and Packets to be forwarded by Persons bringing the same in manner hereinbefore provided ; and upon such Payment being made to return such Letters and Packets to the Persons so to be licensed, and that it shall and may be lawful for such authorized Persons to forward such Letters and Packets by any Ships or Vessels that he or they may think proper, not being Packet Boats, without incurring any Penalty therefore, and without Payment of any other Rate of Postage ; any Law, Statute or Usage to the contrary notwithstanding.

V. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for any Person or Persons authorized by the Postmaster General in Places within His Majesty’s Dominions and Countries beyond the Seas to receive from Masters of Vessels coming from thence into any Port in Great Britain, Letters and Packets which may collected and brought by such Masters to them for the Purpose of being transmitted by the Authority or Postmaster General, and also to receive from such Masters with such Letters at the Rate of Three for every Fifty Letters or Packets, and so in Proportion for a greater or lesser Number ; and such Person or Persons so authorized by the Postmaster General shall make up in a Bag or Parcel all such Letters so received, and inclose therein a Certificate of the Number of Letters contained in the same, and an Impression of Seal which shall be used to seal such Bag or Parcel, and the Date when the same shall be sealed, and shall seal the Bag or Parcel with the Seal of which an Impression shall have been so inclosed, and deliver the same Bag or Parcel to such Masters for the Purpose of being brought by them to the Port at which they shall arrive Great Britain.

VI. And in order to encourage Masters of Ships and Vessels, not being Packet Boats, coming from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions and Places beyond the Seas, be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Masters of Vessels to collect Letters and Packets in Places within His Majesty’s Dominions and Countries beyond the Seas, so as such Letters shall be collected for the Purpose of being transmitted by the Authority of the Postmaster General to Great Britain, and provided that such Masters shall deliver all such Letters to some Person or Persons authorized by the Postmaster General to receive the same for the Purposes aforesaid, and that the Masters shall, upon delivering the same, pay unto the Person or Persons so authorized the Sum of Three Shillings for every Fifty Letters, or so in Proportion for a greater or lesser Number, and shall then receive the same back from such Person or Persons so authorized as aforesaid, in a sealed Bag or Parcel, and shall upon Delivery of such Bag or Parcel so made up and sealed in such manner as is hereinbefore mentioned in a perfect State at any Post Office in Great Britain, be repaid the Sum of Money which they shall have so advanced as aforesaid, and also Two pence per Letter for every Letter which shall be contained in such Bag or Parcel.

VII. Provided also, and be it further enacted, That if any Master of such Ship or Vessel shall open any Bag or Bags of Letters with which he hall have been entrusted, or shall take out of such Bag any Letter or Letters whatsoever, or shall not duly deliver such Bag with the Letters at the Place where he shall arrive, to the Person who may be authorized to receive the same without wilful or unavoidable Delay after his Arrival, every such Master so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Five hundred Pounds.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person whatsoever hall send any Letter or Packet by any Ship or Vessel of which he shall not be Owner, without having the Official Mark of the Postage having been paid thereon, or if any Master shall have on board or carry any Letter, not being the Letter of his Owners, without such Official Mark thereon, every such Person or Persons so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Five Pounds for every Letter or Packet so sent or found on board, or carried as aforesaid.

IX. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Collector, Comptroller or principal Officers of His Majesty’s Customs, at any Port or Place whatsoever, and they are hereby authorized and required to search every Ship or Vessel in any Port or Place for Letters or Packets which may be on board contrary to the Provisions of this Act, and to seize and take all such Letters and to forward the same to the Postmaster General or his Deputy at the Port or Place, and that the Officer seizing and sending the same shall be entitled to One Moiety of the Penalty which may be recovered for any such Offence.

X. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for such Collector, Comptroller or Officer the Customs, and he is hereby authorized and required to administer an Oath to such Master before he departs, that he has not any Letters which have not paid the Rates of Postage hereby imposed on board his Ship or Vessel, not being the Letters of the Owners of his said Ship or Vessel.

XI. And be it further enacted, That on the Arrival of any Ship in Port, the Master shall sign a Declaration in Writing, in the Presence of the Person authorized by the Postmaster General at the Port or Place, who shall also sign the same, that to the best of his Knowledge and Belief he has delivered according to the Provisions of this Act, all the Letters or Bags or Parcels of Letters on board his Vessel, and that until such Declaration shall be signed the Officers of the Customs shall not permit such Ship or Vessel to break Bulk, and in case such Master shall wilfully neglect to make such Declaration he shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Fifty Pounds, One Moiety thereof to be paid to the Informer.

XII. And be it further enacted, That if any Collector, Comptroller or principal Officer hereby required to prohibit any Ship or Vessel breaking Bulk until the Requisites of this Act shall be complied with, shall permit such Ship or Vessel to break Bulk, such Collector, Comptroller or Officer so permitting such Ship or Vessel to break Bulk, shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Twenty Pounds, One Moiety thereof to be paid the Informer.

XIII. And be it further enacted, That One Moiety of the several pecuniary Penalties hereby shall be payable to the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, and the other Moiety to any who shall and will inform and sue for the same, to be recovered with full Costs of Suit by Action of Debt, Bill, Plaint or Information, in any of His Majesty’s Courts of Record in Great Britain, wherein no Essoin, Protection, Privilege or Wager of Law shall be admitted.

XIV. And be it further enacted, That if any Person shall forge or counterfeit, or cause to be forged or counterfeited any Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation upon any Letter hereby authorized to be so stamped, marked or designated, with Intent to avoid the Payment of the Rate of Postage hereby imposed, each and every Person and Persons so offending shall be deemed and taken to be guilty of a Misdemeanor, to be punished by Fine and Imprisonment, and such Offence, if committed within Great Britain, shall and may be enquired of, tried and adjudged, either within the City of London, or where the Offence shall be committed.

XV. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That this Act shall not extend to restrain nor to prevent the East India Company, nor their Court of Directors, from sending and receiving, and causing to be sent and received to and from any of their Governments and Servants Abroad, all Packets, Letters and Papers whatsoever relating to the Affairs, Business and Concerns of the said Company, and of their several Governments Abroad, in the manner heretofore accustomed by the said Company and their Court of Directors, without Payment of any Postage or Duty, nor to subject any Person to any Penalty or Forfeiture in respect thereof.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That, from and after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful for the President of the Board of Commissioners for the Affairs of India for the time being, to send and receive Letters and Packets by the Post free from the Duty of Postage within the United Kingdom, in the same manner and under such Restrictions as the Lord High Chancellor of Great Britain is, by an Act passed in the Forty sixth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, authorized to send and receive Letters and Packets free from Postage.

XVII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for every Member of either House of Parliament, to receive by the Post any Petition addressed to either House of Parliament free from the Duty of Postage, so as the same be sent in a Cover open at the Sides, and that the same shall not exceed the Weight of Six Ounces.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 55 George III, Cap. 103 - June 22, 1815

An Act to regulate the Postage of Ship Letters to and from Ireland.
[ 22d June 1815 ]

WHEREAS it is expedient to alter so much of the several Acts in force in Ireland as relates to the Rates of Postage of Ship Letters, and to the several Regulations respecting such Letters, and to grant other Rates of Postage in lieu of such former Rates ; Be it therefore enacted by The King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That, from and after the Day of July One thousand eight hundred and fifteen, so much of an Act made in the Parliament of Ireland, in the Twenty third and Twenty fourth Years of His present Majesty’s Reign, for establishing a Post Office in Ireland ; and also so much of an Act of the last Session of Parliament, for repealing certain Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland, and granting other Duties in lieu thereof, as granted a Rate of Postage of One Penny for every Letter or Packet directed on board, or brought or sent from on board any Ship or Vessel riding or stopping in any Port within Ireland, over and above all other Rates chargeable on any such Letters ; and also so much of the said recited Act of the Twenty third and Twenty Fourth Years of His Majesty’s Reign, as directs that the Sum of One Penny shall be paid to the Masters of Ships or Vessels, or other Persons, for every Letter or Packet delivered to the Deputy Post Master of the Port or Place in Ireland at which such Ships or Vessels shall touch or arrive ; and all Penalties, Restrictions and Regulations, in the said last recited Act mentioned respecting such Letters, shall be and the same is and are hereby repealed, save and except only so far as relates to the Recovery of any Rates imposed by any such Act, which may be remaining unpaid.

II. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmasters General Ireland, and their Deputy and Deputies by them thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for every Letter and Packet which shall be brought by Ships and Vessels other than Packet Boats, from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions ( other than Great Britain ), and from any Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas into Ireland, the Sum of pence Irish Currency, for every Single Letter ; and for every Double Letter, and for every other Letter and Packet exceeding a Quarter of an Ounce in weight, the Sum of One Shilling Irish Currency in Addition to any Inland or Internal Postage which may arise upon the Inland Conveyance of such Letters and Packets in Ireland.

III. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s said Postmasters General of Ireland, and their Deputies, to receive Letters and Packets directed to Places within His Majesty’s Dominions ( other than Great Britain ), or to Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, from any Person or Persons who may bring the same to any Post Office in Ireland, and who may be desirous to forward such Letters themselves, and to affix upon each Letter and Packet such Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation, as the said Postmasters General in their Discretion shall think proper and order ; and thereupon to demand and receive for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, a Rate of Postage of One third Part of the Rates and Duties payable by Law for such respective Letters and Packets, if the same were conveyed by Packet Boats ; and in cases where no Rate of Postage is already established, then to demand, have, receive and take for such Letters and Packets, Rates, as near as can be ascertained, equal to One third Part of what is now paid for Letters sent beyond the Seas, and upon Payment thereof, to return such Letters and Packets to the Person or Persons bringing the same ; and that it shall and may be lawful for such Person and Persons to forward such Letters and Packets to the Places to which they may be directed, by any Ships or Vessels that he or they may think proper, not being Packet Boats, without incurring any Penalty therefore, and without Payment of any other Rate or Duty of Postage ; any Law, Statute, Custom or Usage to the contrary notwithstanding.

IV. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s said Postmaster General of Ireland, by Writing under their or either of their Hands, and under Seal of the Office of Postmasters General of Ireland, to license and authorize any Person or Persons whatsoever to collect Letters and Packets in Ireland, directed to Places within His Majesty’s Dominions ( other than Great Britain ), and to Kingdoms ant Countries beyond the Seas, for the Purpose of being forwarded according to their Directions, by any Ships or Vessels other than Packet Boats ; provided that such Persons so to be licensed, shall, previous to forwarding the same, bring such Letters and Packets to the Post Office of the Town or Place from whence such Letter or Letters or Packets is or are to be sent, to have a Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation put thereon respectively ; which Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation the Postmasters general and their Deputies, are hereby authorized and required to put thereon ; and to demand, receive and take for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, the same Rates of Postage as are hereby made payable for Letters and Packets to be forwarded by Persons bringing the same, in manner hereinbefore provided ; and upon such Payment being made to return such Letters and Packets to the Persons so to be licensed ; and that it shall and may be lawful for such authorized Persons to forward such Letters and Packets by any Ship or Vessel that he or they may think proper, not being Packet Boats, without incurring any Penalty therefore, and without Payment of any other Rate of Postage ; any Law, Statute or Usage to the contrary notwithstanding.

V. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for any Person or Persons authorized by the said Postmasters General for Ireland, or by the Postmasters General for Great Britain, in Places within His Majesty’s Dominions and Countries beyond the Seas, to receive from the Masters of Vessels coming from thence into any Port in Ireland, Letters and Packets which may be collected and brought by such Masters to them for the Purpose of being transmitted by the Authority of the said Postmasters General, and also to receive from Masters with such Letters at the Rate of Three Shillings for every Fifty Letters or Packets, and so in Proportion for a greater or lesser Number ; and such Person or Persons so authorized by the said Postmasters General, shall make up in a Bag or Parcel, all such Letters so received, and inclose therein a Certificate of the Number of Letters contained in the same, and an Impression of the Seal which shall be used to seal such Bag or Parcel, and the Date when the same shall be sealed ; and shall seal the Bag or Parcel with the Seal of which an Impression shall have been so inclosed, and deliver the same Bag or Parcel to such Masters, for the Purpose of being brought by them to the Port at which they shall arrive in Ireland.

VI. And, in order to encourage Masters of Ships and Vessels, not being Packet Boats, coming from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions ( except from Great Britain ) and from Places beyond the Seas, be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Masters of Vessels to collect Letters and Packets in Places within His Majesty’s Dominions ( except as aforesaid ), and in Countries beyond the Seas, so as such Letters and Packets shall be collected for the Purpose of being transmitted by the Authority of the said Postmasters General to Ireland ; and provided that such Masters shall deliver all such Letters to some Person or Persons authorized by the said Postmasters General to receive the same, for the Purpose aforesaid ; and that the Masters shall, upon delivering the same, pay unto the Person or Persons so authorized, the Sum of Three Shillings for every Fifty Letters, and so in Proportion for a greater or lesser Number, and shall then receive the same Letters back from such Person or Persons so authorized as aforesaid, in a sealed Bag or Parcel ; and shall, upon Delivery of such Bag or Parcel so made up and sealed in such manner as is hereinbefore mentioned, in a perfect State, at any Post Office in Ireland, be repaid the Sum of Money which they shall have so advanced as aforesaid ; and also Two pence per Letter and Packet for every Letter or Packet which shall be contained in such Bag or Parcel.

VII. And be it further enacted, That if any Master of such Ship or Vessel shall open any Bag or Bags of Letters or Packets with which he shall have been entrusted, or shall take out of such Bag any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets whatsoever, or shall not duly deliver such Bag, with the Letters and Packets, at the Place where he shall arrive, to the Person who may be authorized to receive the same, without wilful or unavoidable Delay after his Arrival, every such Master so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Five hundred Pounds, One Moiety to the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, and the other Moiety to any Person who shall sue for the same, to be recovered, with full Costs of Suit, by Action of Debt, Bill, Plaint or Information, in any of His Majesty’s Courts of Record in Dublin, wherein no Essoin, Protection, Privilege or Wager of Law shall be admitted.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person whatsoever shall send any Letter or Packet by any Ship or Vessel of which he shall not be Owner, without having the Official Mark of the Postage having been paid thereon ; or if any Master shall have on board, or carry any Letter or Packet, not being the Letter or Packet of his Owners, without such Official Mark thereon, every such Person or Persons so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Five Pounds for every Letter or Packet so sent or found on board or carried as aforesaid.

IX. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Collector, Comptroller or Principal Officer of His Majesty’s Customs, at any Port or Place whatsoever, and they are hereby authorized and required to search every Ship or Vessel, in any Port or Place, for Letters or Packets which may be Board contrary to the Provisions of this Act, and to seize and take all such Letters and Packets, and to forward the same to the Postmasters General or his Deputy at the Port or Place ; and that the Officers seizing and sending the same shall be entitled to sue for the Penalty for any such Offence, and shall be entitled to One Moiety of such Penalty when recovered.

X. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for such Collector, Comptroller or Officer of the Customs, and he is hereby authorized and required to administer an Oath to every such Master before he departs, that he has not any Letters or Packets which have not paid the Rates of Postage hereby imposed, on board his Ship or Vessel, not being the Letters or Packets of the Owners of his said Ship or Vessel.

XI. And be it further enacted, That on the Arrival of any Ship or Vessel in Port, the Master shall sign a Declaration in Writing, in the Presence of the Person authorized by the Postmasters General at Port or Place, who shall also sign the same, that to the best of his Knowledge and Belief he has delivered, according to the Provisions of this Act, all the Letters and Packets, or Bags or Parcels of Letters and Packets which were on board his Vessel ; and that until such Declaration shall be signed, the Officer of the Customs shall not permit such Ship or Vessel to break Bulk ; and in case such Master shall wilfully neglect to make such Declaration, he shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Fifty Pounds, One Moiety thereof to be paid to Informer.

XII. And be it further enacted, That if any Collector, Comptroller or Principal Officer hereby required to prohibit any Ship or Vessel from breaking Bulk until the Requisites of this Act shall be complied with, shall permit such Ship or Vessel to break Bulk, such Collector, Comptroller or Officer, so permitting such Ship or Vessel to break Bulk, shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Twenty Pounds, One Moiety thereof to be paid to the Informer.

XIII. And be it further enacted, That One Moiety of the several pecuniary Penalties hereby imposed, shall be payable to the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, and the other Moiety to any Person who shall and will inform or sue for the same ; and that all and singular the said Penalties ( except the Penalty of Five hundred Pounds hereinbefore mentioned ) shall and may be recovered by Information before any Two Justices of the Peace of the County, County of the City, City or Town Corporate where such Offences shall be respectively committed, upon the Oath of One credible Witness, which Oath such Justices are hereby empowered to administer ; and if any Person or Persons convicted of any such Offence, shall not forthwith pay the Penalty which he, she or they shall have incurred, it shall be lawful for such Justices of the Peace to send such Person or Persons to the Workhouse, or House of Correction, there to remain at Hard Labour for such time as such Justices shall think proper, not exceeding Three Months.

XIV. And be it further enacted, That if any Person shall forge or counterfeit or cause to be forged or counterfeited any Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation, upon any Letter or Packet hereby authorized to be so stamped, marked or designated, with Intent to avoid or prevent the Payment of the Rate of Postage hereby imposed, each and every Person and Persons so offending shall be deemed and taken to be guilty of a Misdemeanor, to be punished by Fine and Imprisonment.

XV. And be it further enacted, That the Rates and Duties imposed by this Act shall form Part of the Revenue of the Post Office of Ireland, and be applied as such.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be amended, altered or repealed by any Act or Acts to be passed in this Session of Parliament.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 55 George III, Cap. 153 - July 11, 1815

An Act for granting certain Rates on the Postage of Letters to and from Great Britain, The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius, and The East Indies ; and for making certain Regulations respecting the Postage of Ship Letters, and of Letters in Great Britain.
[ 11th July 1815 ]

WHEREAS it is expedient, for the Extension and Improvement of Commerce and Correspondence, and of His Majesty’s Revenue, that Vessels be employed by His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Conveyance of the Public Dispatches of Government, and also the Mails of Letters and Packets he tween this Kingdom, The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and The East Indies ; and that such Vessels should, in certain cases, be permitted to carry Goods on Freight ; Be it therefore enacted by The King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That at any time after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, with the Consent of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three or more of them, to establish Vessels for the Conveyance of the Public Dispatches of Government, and also Mails of Letters, and Passengers, between this Country, The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and The East Indies ; and that from and after the Establishment of such Vessels, it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by such Vessels from the Port of London, or from any other Port in Great Britain, to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius, or to any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to The East Indies ( save and except the Dominions of the Emperor of China ), according to the Rates and Sums, in Sterling Money, hereinafter mentioned, the same being rated either by the Letter or by the Ounce ; that is to say,

For every Single Letter, Three Shillings and Six pence :
For every Double Letter, Seven Shillings :
For every Treble Letter, Ten Shillings and Six pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, Fourteen Shillings ; and so in Proportion for Letters and Packets above the Weight of an Ounce :

And for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by such Vessels from any Port or Place in The East Indies, within the Limits of the said United Company’s Charter ( save and except the Dominions of the Emperor of China ), or from The Cape of Good Hope, or The Mauritius, to the Port of London, or to any other Port in Great Britain, the Rates and Duties following ; that is to say,

For every Single Letter, Three Shillings and Six pence :
For every Double Letter, Seven Shillings :
For every Treble Letter, Ten Shillings and Six pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight Fourteen Shillings ; and so in Proportion for Letters and Packets above the Weight of an Ounce :

And for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by such Vessels between The Cape of Good Hope, or The Mauritius, and any Part of the Continent of Asia, and between The Cape of Good Hope, or The Mauritius, or the Continent of Asia, and all intermediate Places, and between all the intermediate Places respectively, the Rates and Duties following ; that is to say,

For every Single Letter, One Shilling and Nine pence :
For every Double Letter, Three Shi lings and Six pence :
For every Treble Letter, Five Shillings and Three pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, Seven Shillings ; and so in Proportion for Letters and Packets above the Weight of an Ounce.

II. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for any Person or Persons to send and receive by any Mails dispatched to and from The East Indies, The Mauritius, and The Cape of Good Hope, any Newspaper or printed Prices Current, and also any printed Papers liable to the Stamp Duties, and duly stamped, paying for the same Three pence for each Packet, not exceeding One Ounce ; and for each Packet exceeding One Ounce, at the Rate of Three pence per Ounce ; and provided that the same be sent in Covers open at the Side or Ends.

III. And inasmuch as it may on some Occasions be of Advantage to Correspondence, that Letters and Packets should be sent to and from The East Indies and The Cape of Good Hope, by His Majesty’s Ships of War and Store Ships, and by the Ships in the Service of the said United Company sailing between this Country and India, and The Cape Of Good Hope, and by Ship employed in the Private Trade to and from India ;

Be it therefore further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General in his Discretion, by and with the Consent of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, to make up and send Mails of Letters to and from any Port or Place in The East Indies, within the Limits of the said United Company’s Charter ( save and except the Dominions of the Emperor of China ), and to and from The Cape of Good Hope, by any of His Majesty’s Ships of War and Store Ships, or by any of the Ships in the Service of the said United Company, or by Ships employed in the Private Trade to and from India ; and that when and so often as Mails of Letters shall be so conveyed, it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General and his Deputies, for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take the same Rates and Duties, as if the Letters were conveyed by Vessels or Packet Boats, to be established under the Authority of this Act.

IV. And be it further enacted, That the Commander of any such Ship of War, with the Consent and Permission of the Lords Commissioners of the Admiralty, and the Commander of any such Ship in the Service of the said United Company, with the Consent of the said Company, and the Commander of any Ship employed in the Private Trade to and from India, with the Consent of his Owners, is hereby authorized and required to receive on board his Ship, such Mails of Letter and Packets, and to convey and deliver the same accordingly ; and such Commanders respectively shall not incur or be liable to any Penalty for receiving on board or conveying such Letter and Packets in manner aforesaid ; any Law or Statute to the contrary notwithstanding.

V. And be it further enacted, That it shall not be lawful for the said United Company, or the Commander of any Ship in the Service of the said Company, or any Commander of any Ship in the Private Trade to and from India, to charge, demand or receive any Rate or Rate of Postage for any Mails of Letters, other and except any such Postage as may be legally due to the said Company for the Inland Postage, or conveyance of any such Letter in India, or for any sealed Bags, Packages or Parcels of Letters, which may at any time be forwarded by the Postmaster General, by the Ships of the said United Company, or by any such Private Ship.

VI. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for the Postmaster General, whenever the Ships of the said United Company, or any Private Ships, are employed as Packets, to pay the said United Company, and the Owners of any such Private Ships, for the Freight or Conveyance of any such Mails of Letters, such reasonable Sum, and in such manner, as shall be authorized and directed by the Lords of the Treasury, or any Three of them.

VII. And be it further enacted, That a Mail shall be made up and dispatched to India once in every Month, as far as may be found practicable, either by the Vessels to be established and hired by the Postmaster General under the Authority of this Act, or by a Ship of War, or a Ship in the Service of the East India Company, or by a Ship employed in the Private Trade to and from India.

VIII. Manner as the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three or more of them, shall by Warrant in Writing direct ( any Law or Statute to the contrary notwithstanding ), to permit the Exportation on Freight, or on account of the Owners, or of the Public Service, in such Vessels or Packet Boars navigated according to Law, from the Port of London, or any Port or Ports within the Kingdom of Great Britain, or any intermediate Port between Great Britain and The East Indies, to all Ports and Places within the Limits of the Charter of the said United Company, and to the Islands of Saint Helena, The Mauritius and The Cape of Good Hope ( save and except the Dominions of the Emperor of China ) any Goods, Wares and Merchandize ( Tea excepted ) which can now or may at any times hereafter be legally exported ; and also to permit the Importation on Freight, or on account of the Owners, or of the Public Service, in such Vessels or Packet Boats navigated according to Law, from all Ports and Places within the Limits of the said United Company’s Charter, and from The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and the Island of Saint Helena ( save and except as aforesaid ) into the Port of London, or any Port in Great Britain, of any Goods, Wares and Merchandize which are now or may at any time or times hereafter be legally imported ; subject nevertheless to the several Restrictions, Conditions and Limitations in this Act contained.

IX. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to ship, carry or put on board, or permit or suffer to be shipped, carried or put on board such Vessels or Packet Boats, and any Ships or Vessels legally trading to and from The East Indies, such Quantity of Tea as shall be requisite for the Use of the Crew of any such Ship, during the Voyage, not exceeding Two Pounds for each Man on board ; and in case there shall be found on board any such Ships or Vessels as aforesaid, on their Arrival at any Port or Place in the British Islands, or within Two hundred Miles of the same, any Tea exceeding in Quantity One hundred Pounds Weight, every Commander shall incur and be liable to a Penalty of Two Pounds for every Pound Weight of Tea exceeding such a Quantity.

X. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That it shall not be lawful to export or import any Goods, Wares or Merchandize in any Vessel or Packet Boat to be employed under the Authority of this Act, unless such Vessel or Packet Boat shall be of the Burthen of Three hundred and fifty Tons at the least.

XI. And be it further enacted, That if any Commander of any Vessel or Packet Boat to be established under the Authority of this Act, having received His Majesty’s Mail on board, and having received his Clearance, shall wilfully neglect to sail and proceed on his Voyage within Twenty four Hours after the time of Receiving the Mail on board and his Clearance ( Wind and Weather permitting ), or shall wilfully deviate from be Course of his Voyage, such Commander for every such Neglect shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Five hundred Pounds : Provided always that it shall be lawful for the Court of Directors of the said United East India Company to give Directions to delay the Sailing of any Ship or Vessel belonging to and employed by the said Company, for a time to be limited or specified, giving Notice of such Directions to the Postmaster General within Twenty four Hours thereof.

XII. And be it further enacted, That for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and the Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Vessels not employed as Packets from Great Britain, to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius, and The East Indies, there shall be charged and payable a Sea Postage of One Shilling and Two pence a Single Letter, and so in Proportion for Packets ; such Postage to be paid on Delivery of the Letters at The Cape, The Mauritius and The East Indies, as the case may be.

XIII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person shall send without Authority of the Postmaster General to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius or The East Indies, any Letter or Packet, or if any Commander of any Ship or Vessel, or any other Person shall carry or convey any Letter or Packet without such Authority to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius or The East Indies, every such Person so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Five Pounds for every Letter so sent or conveyed.

XIV. And be it further enacted, That the Commander of any Ship sailing to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius or The East Indies, is hereby authorized and required to take charge of and convey any Bags of Letters subject to the aforesaid Rate of One Shilling and Two pence, which shall be delivered to him by Order or Authority of the Postmaster General.

XV. And, for the Services performed by the Commanders of such Vessels, be it further enacted, That they shall be entitled to receive on their Arrival in Port, either in Great Britain or in India, on delivering at the Post Office all such Letters and Packets which they shall have on board, the Sum of Two pence for every Letter or Packet which he or they shall so deliver.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Vessels not employed as Packets from The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and The East Indies, to Great Britain, there shall be charged and payable a Sea Postage of Eight pence for each Single Letter, and so in Proportion for Packets.

XVII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That for Twelve Months from and after the passing of this Aft, no Letter or Packet of whatever Weight or Description coming from The Cape of Good Hope, Mauritius or India, shall be chargeable with a higher Rate of Sea Postage than Five Shillings for such Letter or Packet ; any thing to the contrary in this Act contained notwithstanding.

XVIII. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General in his Discretion, to establish Post Offices, and appoint Deputy Postmasters and other Officers, for the due Execution of this Act, in the United Kingdom, and in any of the Presidencies of the said United Company, and the same from time to time to remove and displace, and others to appoint in their Stead ; and that all such Persons so to be appointed shall give Security to the Satisfaction of the Postmaster General or his Agents for the due Discharge of their respective Duties, and accounting for and paying unto the Treasurers of the said United Company, at their respective Presidencies, on account of the Revenue of the Post Office, all Sums which they shall respectively receive for the Port of Letters and Packets, or in any other manner whatsoever ; and that no such Postmaster or other Person shall at any time retain in his Hands more than One thousand Pounds of the Public Money.

XIX. And be it further enacted, That the Treasurers of the said United Company, at their respective Presidencies shall and they are hereby authorized and required to receive all such Sums, and from time to time to remit the same to the Postmaster General, in such manner and under such Regulations as shall be agreed upon by the said United Company and the Postmaster General.

XX. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for the President of the Board of Commissioners for the Affairs of India for the time being, to send and receive Letters and Packets to and from The East Indies free from the Duties of Postage ; and that it shall be lawful for the Secretary of State for Colonial Affairs, and the Secretaries to the Treasury for the time being, to send and receive Letters and Packets to and from The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and Ceylon, free from the Duty of Postage.

XXI. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Commissioners for the Affairs of India, receiving Salaries in virtue of such Office, and for the Secretary to the said Commissioners for the time being, to send and receive Letters and Packets to or from any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the East India Company or The Cape of Good Hope, provided that the Letters and Packets so to be sent and received by such Commissioners or Secretary, by any one Packet or other Vessel, appointed to carry the Mail, do not collectively exceed the Weight of Five Ounces received, and Five Ounces sent, by each such Commissioners or by such Secretary.

XXII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Chairman and Deputy Chairman of the said United Company for the time being, and for One Year after the said Chairman and Deputy Chairman shall have quitted their respective Offices, to send and receive Letters and Packets free from Postage, to and from The East Indies only ; provided that such Letters and Packets shall be upon the Concerns of the said Company only, and provided that such Letters shall be addressed or superscribed wholly in the Hand Writing of the Chairman or Deputy Chairman, and his Name added thereto in his Hand Writing ; and also that it shall be lawful for the Directors of the said Company to send and receive Letters and Packets to and from The East Indies only, addressed and superscribed in like manner, free from Postage for One Year from and after the passing of this Act, and no longer.

XXIII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Directors of the said Company for the time being, to send and receive Letters and Packets free from Postage to and from The East Indies only, by the Ships of the said Company, provided that such Letters so to be sent and received do not collectively exceed the Weight of Five Ounces, by each Ship of the said Company ; and that such Directors shall and may continue to send and receive such Letters and Packets for One Year after he or they shall have quitted the Direction.

XXIV. Provided always and be it further enacted, That nothing in this Act contained shall extend or be construed to extend, to prevent such Public Officers who now send and receive Letters and Packets free of Postage, from sending and receiving Letters and Packets to and from The Cape of Good Hope, Mauritius, Saint Helena and The East Indies, in the same manner as they are now authorized by Law to send and Letters and Packets free from Postage.

XXV. And Whereas, by a certain Act of Parliament made and passed in the Forty sixth Year of Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act to amend Three Acts made in be Thirty fifth, Forty first and Forty second Years of His present Majesty, relating to be Conveyance of Letter and Packets by be Post, Seamen employed in His Majesty’s Navy and Non Commissioned Officers in the Army, within any Part of His Majesty’s Dominions, whilst actually employed in His Majesty’s Service, were authorized to send and receive by the Post on his or their Private Concerns only, Single Letters, upon Payment of One Penny for each Letter, under the several Restrictions in the said Act contained : And Whereas it is expedient to extend the Provisions of the said Act to Seamen in the Navy, whilst actually employed in His Majesty’s Service in The East Indies, and to Non Commissioned Officers in His Majesty’s Army, whilst actually employed in His Majesty’s Service in The East Indies, and also to the Seamen and Non Commissioned Officers in the Army actually employed in the Service of the East India Company ; Be it therefore further enacted, That, from and after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful to and for each and every Seaman employed in his Majesty’s Navy within any part of The East Indies, and to and for every Serjeant, Corporal, Drummer, Trumpeter, Fifer and Private Soldier in His Majesty’s Regular Forces, Militia, Fencible Regiments, Artillery or Royal Marines, whilst actually employed in His Majesty’s Service in The East Indies. and also to and for every Seaman, whilst actually employed in the Service of the East India Company, and to and for every Serjeant, Corporal, Drummer, Trumpeter, Fifer and Private Soldier in the Service of the said Company, whilst actually employed in the Service of the said Company, and not otherwise, to receive by the Post on his own Private Concerns only, free from Postage , Single Letters ; provided that the several Regulations and Restrictions contained in the said hereinbefore recited Act shall be complied with ; and likewise to send Single Letters by the Post, on his own Private Concerns only, on Payment of One Penny upon putting the same into any Post Office, under the several Regulations and Restrictions in the hereinbefore recited Act contained.

XXVI. And be it further enacted, That all and every the Clauses, Powers, Advantages, Penalties and Methods for the Recovery of the same, contained in the said recited Act, so far as relates to Soldiers and Seamen’s letters, shall be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this Act, as fully and effectually to all Intents and Purposes, as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in this present Act.

XXVII. And Whereas it is expedient to alter and amend an Act passed in the Fifty fourth Year of Reign of His present Most Gracious Majesty, intituled An Act for making certain Regulations respecting the Postage of Ship Letters, and of Letters in Great Britain ; Be it therefore further enacted, That so much of the said Act as authorizes the Postmaster General to take a Rate of Six pence a Letter for Single Letters, and so on in Proportion for Letters brought by Vessels other than Packet Boats from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions, and from Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas into Great Britain ; and as authorizes Persons Places within His Majesty’s Dominions and Countries beyond the Seas to receive from the Masters of Vessels coming from thence into Great Britain, Letters and Packets which may be collected and brought by such Masters to them for the Purposes in the said Act mentioned, and to receive from such Masters at the Rate of Three Shillings for every Fifty Letters or Packets, and so in Proportion for a greater or lesser Number, and as directs the manner in which such Letters are to be transmitted to such Masters of Vessels to Great Britain ; and so much of the said Act as authorizes the Masters of Vessels to collect Letters and Packets within His Majesty’s Dominions and Countries beyond the Seas, for the Purposes in the said Act mentioned, and which directs the Sum of Three Shillings for every Fifty Letters, and so in Proportion for a greater or lesser Number, to be repaid to such Masters, and as authorizes the Payment of Two pence for every Letter to such Masters ; and also so much of the said Act as imposes a Penalty of Five hundred Pounds upon any Master who shall open any Bag or Bags of Letters, or who shall take out of such Bag any Letter or Letters, or shall not duly deliver such Bag at the Place where he shall arrive ; and likewise so much of the said Act as imposes a Penalty of Five Pounds upon any Person sending any Letter or Packet by any Ship or Vessel of which he shall not be Owner, without having the Official Mark of the Postage having been paid thereon, and as imposes a like Penalty upon any Master having on board or carrying any Letter not being the Letter of his Owners, without such Official Mark thereon ; and so much of the said Act as authorizes the Collector, Comptroller or Principal Officers to administer an Oath to such Master, that he has not any Letters which have not paid the Rates of Postage on board his Ship or Vessel, not being the Letters of the Owners of his said Ship ; and likewise so much os the said Act as directs, that on the Arrival of any Ship in Port, the Master shall sign a Declaration that, to the best of his Knowledge and Belief, he has delivered all the Letters, Bags or Parcels of Letters on board his Vessel, and as imposes a Penalty of Fifty Pounds upon any Master neglecting or refusing to make such Declaration ; and likewise so much of the said Act as imposes a Penalty of Twenty Pounds upon any such Collector, Comptroller or principal Officer who shall permit any Ship or Vessel to break Bulk until the Requisites of the Act shall be complied with ; and also so much of the said Act as directs the Mode of recovering the Pecuniary Penalties by the said Act imposed, and the Application of the same ; and also so much of the said Act as renders Persons guilty of a Misdemeanor who shall forge or cause to be forged any Stamp, Mark of Postage or Designation upon any Letter, with Intent to avoid the Payment of the Rate of Postage, shall, from and after the First Day of August One thousand eight hundred and fifteen, be and the same are hereby repealed.

XXVIII. An be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General to demand, have, receive and take for every Letter which shall be brought by Ships and Vessels ( other than Packet Boats ) from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions, and from any the Kingdoms and Places beyond the Seas, into Great Britain, except from The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and The East Indies, a Sea Postage of Eight pence for every Single Letter, and so in Proportion for Packets, in addition to any Inland or Internal Postage which may arise upon the Inland Conveyance of such Letters and Packets ; and for the Encouragement of the Masters of such Ships or Vessels, it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General to allow all such Masters the Sum of Two pence a Letter or Packet upon all such Letters and Packets as they respectively, on their arrival from Parts beyond the Seas, shall deliver unto the Deputy or Deputies of the Postmaster General, for such Place or Post Town at which they shall touch or arrive.

XXIX. Provided always and be it further enacted, That if any Master of any Ship or Vessel shall open any sealed Bag, Package or Parcel of Letters, with which he shall have been entrusted, or shall take out of such Bag, Package or Parcel any Letter or Letters whatsoever, or shall not duly deliver such Bag, Package or Parcel with the Letters at the Post Office on his arrival in Port, without wilful or unavoidable Delay after his Arrival, every such Master so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Two hundred Pounds.

XXX. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for the Owners, Charterers or Consignees of Vessels, to send their Letters on board their own Ships, from any Port in Great Britain to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and The East Indies, free from the Sea Postage ; provided that such Letters shall be endorsed with the Words “Owners or Charterers or Consignees Letter,” and the Christian and Surname, and Place of Abode, of the Owner, Charterer or Consignee, or the Firm of the Owners who shall be the Writer of the same ; and provided that the Letter so sent and endorsed by any Owner or Owners, Charterer or Consignee, or the whole Number of Letters, if there shall be more than One Letter, from such Owner or Owners, Charterer or Consignee, shall not collectively exceed the Weight of Twenty Ounces.

XXXI. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for the Owners or Shippers of Goods to send Letters with their Goods on board any Ship or Vessel from any Port in Great Britain, to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius and The East Indies free from the Ship Letter Postage ; provided that such Letter shall be endorsed with the Christian and Surname of the Writer, or the Firm of the Writers, and with the Words ” Owners or Shippers of Goods ” shipped on board the [ state the Name of the Ship ] bound to [ state the Place ] ; and provided the Letter or Packet of any such Owners or Shippers, or the whole Number of Letters, if there shall be more than One, from such Owners or Shippers, shall not collectively exceed the Weight of Six Ounces.

XXXII. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for the Owners, Charterers or Consignees of Vessels resident in Great Britain, to receive their Letters by their own Vessels from any Place within His Majesty’s Dominions, or Countries beyond the Seas, free from the Sea Postage ; provided that such Owners, Charterers or Consignees shall be described as such in the Address and Superscription of such Letters ; and that such Letters to any One Owner, Charterers or Consignee, shall not, if coming from any Place in The East Indies, exceed collectively the Weight of Twenty Ounces ; and if coming from any other Part beyond the Seas, exceed collectively the Weight of Six Ounces.

XXXIII. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for the Owners or Consignees of Goods on board Ships arriving from Abroad to receive Letters free from the Sea Postage by such Ships, provided that such Owners or Consignees shall be described as such in the Address and Superscription thereof ; and provided it shall appear by the Ship’s Manifest that such Persons actually have Goods on board such Ships, and that the Letter or Letters addressed to any One such owner or Consignee shall not collectively exceed the Weight of Six Ounces.

XXXIV. Provided always, That nothing in this Act shall extend to prevent the Letters of Owners, Consignees or Freighters of Ships arriving in this Country from The East Indies before the Tenth Day of October One thousand eight hundred and sixteen, to receive their Letters free of Postage as heretofore, although they may exceed the Weight herein limited, or may not be marked as directed by this Act.

XXXV. And be it further enacted, That nothing in this, or in any other Act contained, shall extend to charge with the Duty of Postage any Letters or Packets addressed by the Governors of His Majesty’s Settlements of Ceylon, The Cape of Good Hope or The Mauritius, or by the Secretaries of these Governments respectively, to the Agents of those respective Governments residing in England, or by such Agents to such Governors or Secretaries : Provided always, that the Contents of such Letters and Packets relate bona fide to the Public Service, or Concerns of such Governments, and that they are superscribed by such Governor, Secretary or Agent respectively.

XXXVI. And be it further enacted. That in case any Collector, Comptroller or other Officer of His Majesty’s Customs, find any Letter or Letters superscribed as the Letters of such Owners, Charterers, Consignees or Shippers, exceeding the Number or Weight limited by this Act then it shall and may be lawful for such Collector, Comptroller or other Officer to seize so many of the Letters as shall reduce the Remainder within the proper Weight, and shall take the same to the nearest Post Office, and the Postmaster of the Place shall pay to the Officer delivering the same at the Rate of Two Shillings and Six pence for each Letter or Packet so seized.

XXXVII. And be it further enacted, That the Rates of Postage for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by Packet Boats, or Ships or Vessels employed as Packet Boats, to any Part of His Majesty’s Dominions and Countries beyond the Seas, excepting The East Indies, shall and may with the Consent of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three of them, either be received at the Post Office in Great Britain, upon forwarding the same, or by the Deputy or Deputies of the Postmaster General upon their Delivery.

XXXVIII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Collector, Comptroller or other Officer of His Majesty’s Customs, at any Port or Place whatsoever, and he is hereby authorized to require a Declaration from any Commander of any Ship or Vessel sailing to The Cape of Good Hope, The Mauritius or The East Indies, that he has not nor will take any Letters on board his Ship which have not been delivered to him by Authority of the Postmaster General, or which are not exempted from Postage by this Act ; which Declaration shall be in the Form, or to the Effect following :

I A. B. Commander of the [ state the Name of the Ship or Vessel ] bound to [ state the Place ] do, as required by Law, solemnly declare, That I have not to the best of my Knowledge and Belief on board my Ship or Vessel, nor will I take any Letters which have not been delivered to me by Authority of the Postmaster General, or which are not exempted from Postage.

And in case any such Commander shall make a false or untrue Declaration he shall, for every such Offence, forfeit and pay the Sum of Fifty Pounds.

XXXIX. And be it further enacted, That on the Arrival of any Ship or Vessel in any Port where there is a Post Office, or at the Port of its Destination, the Master shall immediately send to the same all the Bags, Packages or Parcels of Letters, and all other Letters on board his Ship, and shall, to the utmost of his Power, procure all his Crew and Passengers to send any Letters which may be in their Possession, except such Letters as are exempted by this Act ; and the Master shall at the same time, or at the Port or Place where the Ship or Vessel shall report, sign a Declaration in the Presence of the Person authorized by the Postmaster General at Port or Place, who shall also sign the same : which Declaration shall be in the Form, or to the Effect following ; that is to say,

I A. B. Commander of the [ state the Name of the Ship or Vessel ] arrived from [ state the Place ] do, as required by Law, solemnly declare, That I have, to the best of my Knowledge and Belief, delivered or caused to be delivered at the Post Office at [ state the Place ] every Letter, Bag, Package or Parcel of Letters that were on board the [ state the Name of the Ship ] except such Letters as are exempted by this Act.

And that until such Declaration shall be made and produced to the Collector, Comptroller or Principal Officer of the Customs, he or they shall not permit such Ship or Vessel to report.

XL. And be it further enacted, That if any Master of any Ship or Vessel shall wilfully refuse or neglet to make the several Declarations by this Act required, or to produce the last mentioned Declaration, he shall forfeit and pay for every such Offence, the Sum of Fifty Pounds.

XLI. And be it further enacted, That if any Collector, Comptroller or Principal Officer, hereby required prohibit any Ship or Vessel reporting until the Requisites of this Act shall be complied with, shall permit such Ship or Vessel, to report such Collector, Comptroller or Officer, so permitting such Ship or Vessel to report, shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Two hundred Pounds.

XLII. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for such Collector, Comptroller or Officer, at any Port or Place whatsoever, who, in the due Execution of his Duty as a Revenue Officer, shall discover any Letters or Packets on board any Vessel in any Port or Place whatsoever, contrary to the Provision of this Act, to seize and take all such Letters and Packets, and to forward the same to the Postmaster General or his Deputy, at the Port or Place ; and that the Officer seizing and sending the same shall be entitled to Moiety of the Penalty which may be recovered for any such Offence ; and that in all cases of such Seizure Proof shall lie on the Person in whose Possession or Baggage the Letters or Packets shall be found that Provisions of this Act have been complied with.

XLIII. And be it further enacted, That in case any Bags, Packages or Parcels of Letters shall be brought by any Ship of War, the Commander thereof shall cause the same and all Letters which may be on board ( except the Public Dispatches of Government ) to be immediately sent to the Post Office at the First Port where he shall arrive ; and such Commander shall, for all such Letters, be entitled to receive the same Allowances as payable to Masters of Ships or Vessels.

XLIV. And be it further enacted, That in case it shall happen from any unforeseen circumstances, that Master of any Ship or Vessel, or the Commander of any Ship of War, shall, upon delivering his Bags, Packages or Parcels of Letters, be prevented from receiving the Money to which he shall be entitled, such Master or Commander shall nevertheless be paid the same, by the Order of the Postmaster General, at such other Places as may be most convenient.

XLV. And be it further enacted, That the Rates of Postage hereinbefore mentioned for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the said Packet Boats, Ships or Vessels from any Port in Great Britain, to any in The East Indies, shall be received by the Deputies of the Postmaster General, upon their Delivery in India, and that the Rates of Postage for the Conveyance of Letters from any Port or Place in The East Indies to Great Britain shall be received at the Option of the Parties sending the same, or upon their Delivery in Great Britain or Ireland, by the Deputies of the Postmaster General in India upon forwarding the same.

XLVI. And be it further enacted, That if after the Master of any Vessel shall have delivered his Letters at the Post Office of any Port at which he may touch, prior to his arriving at that Port where the Ship or Vessel is to report, any Letter or Packet not exempted by this Act, shall be found on board his Vessel, in his Possession, or in the Possession of any of his Crew, or any Passenger on board, every such Person knowingly having such Letter or Packet in his Possession or in his Baggage, shall forfeit and pay for every Letter the Sum of Five Pounds.

XLVII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person whatsoever shall falsely superscribe any Letter as being the Owner, Charterer or Consignee of the Vessel conveying the same, or the Owner, Shipper or Consignee of the Goods shipped in the Vessel, every such Person and Persons so offending shall, for every such Offence, forfeit and pay the Sum of Ten Pounds.

XLVIII. And be it further enacted, That One Moiety of the several Pecuniary Penalties hereby imposed shall be payable to the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs and Successors, and the other Moiety to any Person who shall and will inform and sue for the same, to be recovered with full Costs of Suit, by Action of Debt, Bill, Plaint or Information, in any of His Majesty’s Courts of Record in Great Britain, or in the Colony or Place where the Offence shall be committed, wherein no Essoin, Protection or Privilege, or Wager of Law shall be admitted.

XLIX. And be it further enacted, That if at any time hereafter ( Sic. After Establishment, if Three Months elapse without dispatching Public Mail, any Person may carry Letters without being subject to Penalties of Act ) the Establishment of such Vessels as aforesaid, a Space of Three Calendar Months shall have elapsed without any Public Mail having been dispatched from Great Britain to The Cape of Good Hope and The Mauritius, and the several Presidencies of Fort William, Fort Saint George and Bombay in The East Indies, it shall be lawful for any Person to send, or take on board, and carry any Letters or Packets from Great Britain to such of the said Places to which no Mail shall have been so dispatched during the time aforesaid, or from such of the Places aforesaid from which no Mail shall have been so dispatched to Great Britain, without being subject therefore to any of the Penalties, Forfeitures, Payments or Restrictions in this Act contained, until some Public Mail shall have been again dispatched from Great Britain to such Place, or from such Place to Great Britain.

L. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing in this Act contained shall extend or be construed to extend to any Letters or Packets to or from China, but that they may be sent and carried as heretofore has been used ; any thing to the contrary herein contained notwithstanding.

LI. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That no Person or Persons shall incur or become liable to any of the Penalties by this Act imposed, so far as the same shall relate to Letters to be sent to and from India, unless the Provisions hereinbefore contained, as to establishing Vessels for the Conveyance of Mails of Letters to The East Indies, shall be carried into Effect within Six Months from the passing of this Act.

LII. And be it further enacted, That in any Action or Suit against any Person or Persons, for collecting, carrying, conveying, delivering or sending Letters or Packets contrary to the Provisions in an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne intituled An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominion, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of War, and other Her Majesty’s Occasions, or contrary to the Provisions in an Act made in the Forty second Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for amending so much of an Act, passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, as relates to the secreting, embezzling or destroying any Letter or Packet sent by the Post, and for the better Protection of such Letters and Packets, and for more effectually preventing Letters and Packets being sent otherwise than by the Post, or in either of them, or contrary to the Provisions of this Act, the Proof shall lie on the Person or Persons against whom such Action or Suit shall be brought, for delivering or sending Letters or Packets, that the same were delivered or sent according to the Provisions contained in the said last mentioned Acts, or one of them, or according to the Provisions contained in this present Act.

LIII. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise by the several Rates and Duties as aforesaid ( except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Management and Collection of the same ), shall be paid into the Receipt of the Exchequer at Westminster, and carried to and made Part of the Conolidated Fund of Great Britain.

LIV. And be it further enacted, That if any Action or Suit shall be commenced against any Person or Persons, for any thing done in pursuance of this Act, the same shall be commenced within Twelve Months after the Fact committed, and not afterwards ; and the Defendant or Defendants in such Action or Suit shall and may plead the General Issue, and give this Act and the Special Matter in Evidence, and that the same was done in pursuance and by the Authority of this Act ; and if it shall appear so to be done, or that such Action or Suit shall be commenced after the time before limited for bringing the same, that then the Jury shall find for the Defendant or Defendants ; and upon a Verdict for the Defendant, or if the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall he nonsuited, or discontinue his, her or their Action or Suit, after the Defendant or Defendants shall have appeared, or if, upon Demurrer, Judgment shall be given against the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs, the Defendant or Defendants shall and may recover Treble Costs, and have the like remedy for the same as any Defendant or Defendants hath or have in any other cases by Law.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 59 George III, Cap. 111 - July 12, 1819

An Act to repeal so much of an Act passed in the Fifty fifth Year of His present Majesty, as relates to the Postage and Conveyance of Letters to and from the Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, the Mauritius, and the East Indies ; and to make other Regulations respecting the Postage of such Letters and Packets, and other Letters and Packets sent by the Post.
[ 12th July 1819 ]

WHEREAS an Act was passed in the Fifty fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for granting certain Rates on the Postage of Letters to and from Great Britain, the Cape of Good Hope, the Mauritius, and the East Indies, and for making certain Regulations respecting the Postage of Ship Letters, and of Letters in Great Britain: And Whereas it is expedient that the said Act, so far as it relates to the Postage and Conveyance of Letters, Newspapers, printed Prices Current, and printed Papers, to and from the Cape of Good Hope,Ceylon, the Mauritius, and the East Indies, should be repealed, and that other Regulations should be made in lieu thereof; Be it therefore enacted by The King’s Most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the passing of this Act the said Act of the Fifty fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, so far as relates to the Postage and Conveyance of Letters, Newspapers, printed Prices Current, and printed Papers, to and from the Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, the Mauritius, and the East Indies shall be and the same is hereby repealed.

II. Provided always nevertheless, and be it further enacted, That any Penalty which hall have been incurred for any Offence contrary to the Provisions of the said recited Act, previously to the passing of this Act, shall and may be recovered and applied in the same Manner, to all Intents and Purposes, as if the said recited Act had not been repealed.

III. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, to demand, have, receive and take for every Letter or Packet which shall be brought into Great Britain by any Ship or Vessel arriving from Ceylon, the Mauritius, or any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the United Company of Merchants of England trading to the East Indies, or from the Cape of Good Hope the Rates following ; that is to say,

For every such Letter or Packet, a Sea Postage of Four pence ; provided the fame shall not exceed the Weight of Three Ounces :

And for every Letter or Packet exceeding the Weight of Three Ounces, a Sea Postage of One Shilling per Ounce, in addition to any inland or internal Postage which may arise upon the inland Conveyance of such Letters and Packets.

And for the Encouragement of the Masters or Commanders of such Ships or Vessels it hall be lawful for the Postmaster General to allow to every such Commander or Master the Sum of Two pence a Letter or Packet, upon all such Letters and Packets as he or they respectively, on their Arrival from Ceylon, the Mauritius, or any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the said United Company, or from the Cape of Good Hope, shall deliver unto the Deputy or Deputies of the Postmaster General, according to the Directions hereinafter contained.

IV. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorised, in his and their Discretion, to collect and receive Letters and Packets of Letters directed to Ceylon, the Mauritius, or any Port or Place within the Limits of the said United Company’s Charter, or to the Cape of Good Hope and to forward the fame by any Ships or Vessels that he in his Discretion hall think fit ; and also that it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorised, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for every Letter or Packet that hall be delivered to him, or to his Deputy, for Conveyance in manner hereinbefore specified, the Rates following ; that is to say

For every such Letter a Sea Postage of Two pence ; provided the same shall not exceed the Weight of Three Ounces ;

And for every Letter or Packet exceeding in Weight Three Ounces, a Sea Postage at the Rate of One Shilling per Ounce : any Law, Statute, Usage or Custom to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.

V. And be it further enacted, That it hall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy or Deputies by him thereunto authorised, in his and their Discretion to receive Newspapers or printed Price Currents, and also any printed Paper liable to the Stamp Duties and duly stamped, for Conveyance to such Places as aforesaid ; and also that it hall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for the Conveyance of the same, the Sum of One Penny for each Packet not exceeding One Ounce, and for each Packet exceeding One Ounce, at the Rate of One Penny per Ounce ; provided always, that the same be sent in Covers open at the Sides.

VI. And be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained hall be construed to oblige any Person or Persons to send any Letters or Packets of Letters, or any Newspapers, or printed Prices Current, or any other printed Papers, to the East Indies, or to the Islands of Ceylon or the Mauritius, or any Port or Place whatsoever within the Limits of the Charter of the said United Company, or to the Cape of Good Hope, through His Majesty’s Post Office, but that it shall be lawful for all Persons to send Letters and Packets Letters, Newspapers, printed Prices Current, and other printed Papers to those Places in any manner that they may find practicable and convenient.

VII. And be it further enacted, That the Commanders of all Ships or Vessels bound to Ceylon, the Mauritius, or any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the said United Company, or to the Cape of Good Hope, are hereby required to receive on board their respective Ships any Bag or Bags of Letters and Packets which shall be tendered to them for Conveyance as aforesaid by the Postmaster General, or his Deputy and Deputies, without receiving or being entitled to receive any Remuneration for such Conveyance.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That in case any such Commander mail refuse to receive on board his Ship any such Bag or Bags of Letters and Packets, which shall be so tendered to him for Conveyance as aforesaid, or having received on board any such Bag or Bags, shall wilfully neglect to deliver the fame on his Arrival at the Port or Place of his Destination, then and in either of such Cases, such Commander shall forfeit and pay a Penalty of Two hundred Pounds.

IX. And be it further enacted, That it hall be lawful for the Court of Directors of the said United Company, or the Secret Committee appointed by the said Court, in pursuance of Two Acts passed in the Thirty third and Fifty third Years of His present Majesty’s Reign, to receive free from all Duty of Postage from the several Governments in India, or from any Agent or other Officer of the said Company, at any Place within the Limits of the Charter of the said Company, any Letter or Packet relating entirely to the Affairs of the said Company, and in like manner to send any such Letters and Packets addressed to such Governments, Agents or other Officers, free from all Duty of Postage ; provided that all Letters so sent be superscribed by the Chairman, or Deputy Chairman, or Secretary, or Assistant Secretary of the said Company.

X. And be it further enacted, That it hall and may be lawful for the said Court of Directors, Secret Committee, and Secretary or Assistant Secretary of the said United Company, to receive from any Officer or Agent of the said Company abroad any Letters or Packets entirely relating to the Affairs of the said Company by Ships in the Service of the said Company, in the manner heretofore accustomed, without Payment of any Postage, and without subjecting any Person to any Penalty or Forfeiture in respect thereof.

XI. And be it further enacted, That it hall be lawful for the Commissioners for the Affairs of India, and for the Chairman and Deputy Chairman of the said East India Company for the time being, to send and receive Letters and Packets to and from Ceylon, the Mauritius, or any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the said Company, or to and from the Cape of Good Hope, free from all Duty of Postage ; provided that no such Letter or Packet exceed the Weight of Three Ounces.

XII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing in this Act contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to prevent such public Officers as may now send and receive Letters and Packets free of Postage, from sending and receiving Letters and Packets free from any Postage directed to be paid by this Act, in the same manner as they are now authorised by Law to send and receive Letters and Packets free from Postage.

XIII. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful for the Secretary to the Board of Commissioners for the Affairs of India for the time being, to send and receive Letters and Packets by the Post free from the Duty of Postage, in the same manner and under such Regulations and Restrictions as the Under Secretaries to His Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State are, by an Act passed in the Forty second Year of His present Majesty’s Reign, or by any other Act, or by this Act, authorised to send and receive Letters and Packets free from Postage.

XIV. And be it further enacted, That nothing in this or any other Act contained hall extend to charge with the Duty of Postage any Letters or Packets addressed by the Governors of His Majesty Settlements of Ceylon, the Cape of Good Hope, or the Mauritius, or by the Secretaries of such Governments respectively, to the Agents of those respective Governments residing in England, or by such Agents to such Governors or Secretaries : Provided always that, the Contents of such Letters and Packets relate bona fide to the Public Service or Concerns of such Governments, and such Governor, Secretary or Agent respectively superscribe the same.

XV. And be it further enacted, That it hall be lawful for the Directors of the said Company for the time being, to receive Letters and Packets free from Sea Postage, from any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the said United Company, by Ships in the Service of the said Company ; provided that the Letters and Packets brought by any one such Ship to be received by any such Director, do not collectively exceed the Weight of Six Ounces ; and that such Persons as shall have been Directors may continue to receive such Letters and Packets free from Postage for One Year after they respectively shall have ceased to be Directors.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Owners, Charterers or Consignees of Vessels, resident in Great Britain, to receive their Letters by their own Vessels. from Ceylon, the Mauritius, or any Port or Place within the Limits of the Charter of the said United Company, or from the Cape of Good Hope, free from Sea Postage ; provided that such Owners Charterers or Consignees shall be described as such in the Address and Superscription of such Letters, and that such Letters brought by any one Vessel to any one Owner, Charterer or Consignee, shall not collectively exceed the Weight of Twenty Ounces.

XVII. And be it further enacted. That it shall be lawful for the Owners or Consignees of Goods on board Ships arriving from Ceylon, the Mauritius, or any Port or Place within the Charter of the said United Company, or from the Cape of Good Hope, to receive Letters free from the Sea Postage by such Ships ; provided that such Owners or Consignees shall be described as such in the Address and Superscription thereof and provided it shall appear by the Ship’s Manifest, that such Persons actually have Goods on board such Ships ; and that the Letter or Letters brought by any one such Ship, for any one such Owner or Consignee, shall not collectively exceed the Weight of Six Ounces.

XVIII. And be it further enacted, That if any Person whatsoever shall falsely superscribe any Letter, as being the Owner, Charterer or Consignee of the Vessel conveying the same, or the Owner, Shipper or Consignee of the Goods shipped in the Vessel, every such Person and Persons so offending shall for every such Offence forfeit and pay the Sum of Ten Pounds.

XIX. And be it further enacted, That such Owners, Charterers, Consignees and Shippers, may on the Account of such Ship obtain such Letters as they respectively may be entitled to receive free of Sea Postage as aforesaid, from the Master of such Ship, before he shall make his Delivery at the Post Office in manner hereinafter directed ; but nothing in this Act hall entitle such Owners or Consignees to take away any Letters whatever not within the Limitation of Weight and Superscription.

XX. And be it further enacted, That in case any Collector, Comptroller or other Officer of His Majesty’s Customs, shall find any Letter or Letters superscribed as the Letters of such Owners, Charterers, Consignees or Shippers, exceeding the Weight limited by this Act, then it shall be lawful for such Collector, Comptroller or other Officer, to seize so many of the Letters as shall reduce the Remainder within the proper Weight, and he shall take the same to the nearest Post Office ; and the Post Master of the Place shall pay to the Officer delivering the same at the Rate of Sixpence for each Letter or Packet so seized.

XXI. And be it further enacted, That on the Arrival of any Ship or Vessel off the Coast of Great Britain, the Master shall cause all Letters on board his Ship ( except such Letters as may be obtained by such Owners, Charterers, Consignees and Shippers as aforesaid, and except Letters and Packets exceeding the Weight of Three Ounces ) to be collected and enclosed in some Bag, Box or other Envelope, to be sealed with his Seal, and to be addressed to any of His Majesty’s Deputy Postmasters in Great Britain, to be in readiness to send on Shore by his own Boat or by the Pilot Boat, or any other safe and convenient Opportunity, in order that the fame may be delivered at the first regular Post Office which can be communicated with, and be distributed from thence by the earliest Inland Posts ; and shall likewise cause all Letters and Packets exceeding the Weight of Three Ounces ( except such as may be obtained by Owners, Charterers, Consignees and Shippers as aforesaid ), to be collected and enclosed in some Bag, Box or other Envelope, to be sealed and addressed as aforesaid, and shall deliver the same at the regular Port or Place where the Ship or Vessel shall report, and shall at such Port or Place sign a Declaration in the Presence of the Person authorised by the Postmaster General at such Port or Place, who shall also sign the same ; which Declaration shall be in the Form or to the Effect following ; that is to say,

I A. B. Commander of the [ state the Name of the Ship or Vessel ] arrived from [ state the place ] do, as required by Law, solemnly declare, That I have, to the best of my Knowledge and Belief, delivered, or caused to be delivered to the Post Office, every Letter, Bag, Package or Parcel of Letters that were on board the [ state the Name of the Ship ] except such Letters as are exempted by Law.

And that until such Declaration shall be made and produced to the Comptroller or Principal Officer of the Customs, he or they shall not permit such Ship or Vessel to report.

XXII. And be it further enacted, That if any Master of any Ship or Vessel shall willingly refuse or neglect to make or produce the said Declaration, he shall forfeit and pay for every such Offence, the Sum of Fifty Pounds.

XXIII. And be it further enacted, That if any Collector, Comptroller or Principal Officer, hereby required to prohibit any Ship or Vessel reporting until the Requisites of this Act hall be complied with, shall permit such Ship or Vessel to report, such Collector, Comptroller or Officer, for permitting such Ship or Vessel to report, shall forfeit and pay the Sum of Fifty Pounds.

XXIV. And be it further enacted, That if, after the Master of any Vessel shall have sent his Letters to the Post Office of any Port at which he may touch, prior to his arriving at that Port where the Ship or Vessel is to report, any Letter or Packet not exempted by this Act shall be found on board his Vessel, in his Possession, or in the Possession of any of his Crew, or any Passenger on board, every such Person knowingly having such Letter or Packet in his Possession or in his Baggage, shall forfeit and pay for every Letter the Sum of Five Pounds.

XXV. And be it further enacted, That it hall be lawful for such Collector, Comptroller or other Officer, at any Port or Place whatsoever, who in the due Execution of his Duty as a Revenue Officer shall discover any Letters or Packets on board any Vessel, in any Port or Place whatsoever, contrary to the Provisions of this Act, to seize and take all such Letters and Packets, and to forward the same to the Postmaster General or his Deputy at the Port or Place ; and that the Officer seizing and sending the same shall be entitled to One Moiety of the Penalty which may be recovered for any such Offence ; and that in all Cases of such Seizure, the Proof that the Provisions of this Act have been complied with, shall lie on the Person in whose Possession or Baggage the Letters or Packets shall be found.

XXVI. And be it further enacted, That if any Person to whom any Letters may be entrusted by the Master of any Ship or Vessel, sealed up in the manner required by this Act, shall break the Seal, or in any manner open the same, or shall not duly deliver the same without wilful or unavoidable Delay, every Person so offending shall forfeit and pay for every such Offence the Sum of Twenty Pounds.

XXVII. And be it further enacted, That in case any Bags, Packages or Parcels of Letters shall be brought by any Ship of War, the Commander thereof shall cause the same, and all Letters which may be on board ( except the public Dispatches of Government ), to be immediately sent to the Post Office at the first Port where he shall arrive ; and such Commander shall, for all such Letters, be entitled to receive the same Allowances as are payable to the Masters of other Ships and Vessels.

XXVIII. And be it further enacted, That in case it shall happen from any unforeseen Circumstances, that the Master of any Ship or Vessel, or the Commander of any Ship of War, shall upon delivering his Bags, Packages or Parcels of Letters, be prevented from receiving the Money to which he shall be entitled, such Master or Commander shall nevertheless be paid the same, by the Order of the Postmaster General, at such other Places as may be most convenient.

XXIX. And be it further enacted, That one Moiety of the several pecuniary Penalties hereby imposed shall be payable to the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, and the other Moiety to any Person who shall inform and sue for the same, to be recovered with full Costs of Suit by Action of Debt, Bill, Plaint or Information, in any of His Majesty’s Courts of Record in Great Britain, wherein no Effoign, Protection or Privilege, or Wager of Law, shall be admitted.

XXX. And be it further enacted, That in any Action or Suit against any Person or Persons, for collecting, carrying, conveying, delivering or sending Letters or Packets contrary to the Provisions in an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of the War, and other Her Majesty’s Occasions ; or contrary to the Provisions in an Act made in the Forty second Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for amending so much of an Act passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, as relates to the secreting, embezzling or destroying any Letter or Packet sent by the Post ; and for the better Protection of such Letters and Packets ; and for more effectually preventing Letters and Packets being sent otherwise than by the Post ; or in either of them, or contrary to the Provisions of this Act, the Proof that the Letters or Packets were collected, carried, conveyed, delivered or sent, according to the Provisions contained in the said last mentioned Acts, or one of them, or according to the Provisions contained in this present Act ( as the case may require ), shall lie on the Person or Persons against whom such Action or Suit shall be brought for delivering or sending the same.

XXXI. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise by the several Rates and Duties as aforesaid ( except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Management and Collection of the same ), shall be paid into the Receipt of the Exchequer at Westminster, and carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

XXXII. And be it further enacted, That if any Action or Suit hall be commenced against any Person or Persons for any thing done in pursuance of this Act, the same shall be commenced within Twelve Months after the Fact committed, and not afterwards ; and the Defendant or Defendants in such Action or Suit shall and may plead the General Issue, and give this Act and the Special Matter in Evidence, and that the same was done in pursuance and by the Authority of this Act ; and if it shall appear so to be done, or that such Action or Suit shall be commenced after the time before limited for bringing the same, that then the Jury shall find for the Defendant or Defendants ; and upon a Verdict for the Defendant, or if the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall be nonsuited, or discontinue his, her or their Action or Suit after the Defendant or Defendants hall have appeared, or if upon Demurrer Judgment shall be given against the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs, the Defendant or Defendants shall and may recover Treble Costs, and have the like Remedy for the fame as any Defendant or Defendants hath or have in any other Cases by Law.

XXXIII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing in this Act contained shall extend or be construed to extend to any Letters or Packets to or from China, but that they may be sent and carried as heretofore has been used, any thing to the contrary herein contained in any way notwithstanding.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 5 George IV, Cap. 10 - March 16, 1824

An Act for granting to His Majesty Rates of Postage on the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to and from Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America.
[ 16th March 1824 ]

WHEREAS it is expedient, for the Benefit of Commerce and Correspondence, to establish One or more Packet Boats between the Port of Falmouth in the County of Cornwall, or such other Port in this Kingdom as His Majesty’s Postmaster General shall appoint, and Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America ; Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the Establishment of Packet Boats between this Kingdom and Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America, it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats from or to the Port of Falmouth aforesaid, or from or to any other convenient Port in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, to or from Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America, over and above all other Rates payable for Conveyance of such Letters and Packets within the said United Kingdom, a Packet Postage, according to the Pates and Sums in Sterling Money hereinafter mentioned ; that is to say, for the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter, Two Shillings and Five Pence ; for every Double Letter, Four Shillings and Ten Pence ; for every Treble Letter, Seven Shillings and Three Pence ; and for every Ounce in Weight, Nine Shillings and Eight Pence ; and so in Proportion for every Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce.

II. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Establishment of Packet Boats for the Purposes aforesaid, all and every the Clauses, Provisions, Powers, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties and Methods for Recovery of the same, and all other Matters and Things contained in any Act or Acts of Parliament relating to the Post Office, shall extend and be deemed and construed to extend to Letters and Packets to be conveyed between the said United Kingdom and Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America.

III. And Whereas it may also be expedient that Packet Boats should hereafter be established to His Majesty’s Colonies, and also to other Foreign Parts, where Rates of Postage have not hitherto been authorized : And Whereas at the Time of establishing such Packet Boats Parliament may not be sitting, and no Rates of Postage can in such Case be authorized by Law for the Port and Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the same ; Be it therefore enacted, That from and after the Establishment of any such Packet Boats to any of His Majesty’s Colonies or other Foreign Parts, it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, with the Consent of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three them, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by such Packet Boats which may hereafter be established as hereinbefore is mentioned, such Rates of Packet Postage as shall be equal in Proportion to the Rates by this Act made payable for the Port or Conveyance of Letters and Packets between Buenos Ayres or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America.

IV. Provided always, and it is hereby further enacted, That as soon as conveniently may be after the next Session of Parliament succeeding the Establishment of such Rates as aforesaid, the Receipt of such Packet Rates of Postage as may then be judged necessary and expedient shall be by such Session of Parliament authorized by Law, any Thing herein contained to the contrary thereof notwithstanding.

V. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise by the Rates and Duties aforesaid, except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Management and Collection of the same, shall be paid into the Receipt of the Exchequer at Westminster, and be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom Great Britain and Ireland.

VI. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall at any Time or Times be sued, molested or prosecuted for any Thing by him, her, or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the Special Matter in Evidence for his, her, or their Defence ; and if upon the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him, her, or them, against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 6 George IV, Cap. 44 - June 22, 1825

An Act for granting to His Majesty Rates of Postage on the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to and from Columbia and Mexico.
[ 22d June 1825 ]

WHEREAS by an Act made in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for granting to His Majesty Rates of Postage on the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to and from Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the continent of South America, reciting, that it might be expedient that Packet Boats should be established to His Majesty’s Colonies, and also to other Foreign Parts, where Rates of Postage had not hitherto been authorized, and that at the Time of establishing such Packet Boats, Parliament might not be sitting, and no Rates of Postage could in such Case be authorized by Law for the Port and Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the same, it was therefore enacted, that from and after the Establishment of any such Packet Boats to any of His Majesty’s Colonies or other Foreign Parts, it should be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, with the Consent of the Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, or any Three of them, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that should be carried or conveyed by such Packet Boats which might hereafter be established as hereinbefore mentioned, such Rates of Packet Postage as should be equal in proportion to the Rates by the now reciting Act made payable for the Port or Conveyance of Letters and Packets between Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America ; and it was further enacted, that as soon as conveniently might be after the next Session of Parliament succeeding the Establishment of such Rates as aforesaid, the Receipt of such Packet Rates of Postage as might then be judged necessary and expedient, should be by such Session of Parliament authorized by Law : And Whereas since the last Session of Parliament it hath been found expedient for the Convenience and Improvement of Trade and Commerce, to establish Packet Boats between the Port of Falmouth, in this Kingdom and certain Ports in Columbia and Mexico on the Continent of America, and also between certain Ports in the British Colonies in the West Indies and Columbia and Mexico ; and such Packet Boats have been established accordingly : And Whereas it is expedient that the Rates of Postage for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by Packet Boats between the several Places aforesaid be authorized by an Act of Parliament : Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the passing of this Act, it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats from or to the Port of Falmouth aforesaid, or from or to any other convenient Port in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, to or from any Port or Ports in Columbia or Mexico on the Continent of America, over and above all other Rates payable for the Conveyance of such Letters and Packets within the said United Kingdom, a Packet Postage according to the Rates and Sums in Sterling Money hereinafter mentioned ; ( that is to say, )

For the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter to or from any Port or Ports in Columbia or Mexico, the Sum of Two Shillings and one Penny :
For every Double Letter, Four Shillings and Two Pence :
For every Treble Letter, Six Shillings and Three Pence :
And for every Ounce, Eight Shillings and Four Pence, and so in proportion for every Packet or Letter of greater Weight than an Ounce.

And for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by any of His Majesty’s Packets from or to any Port or Ports in the British Colonies in the West Indies, to or from any Port or Ports in Columbia or Mexico, the Rates and Duties following ; ( that is to say, )

For every Single Letter, One Shilling :
For every Double Letter, Two Shillings :
For every Treble Letter, Three Shillings :
And for every Ounce in Weight, Four Shillings and so in proportion for every Packet or Letter above the Weight of an Ounce.

II. And be it further enacted, That all and every Clauses, Provisions, Powers, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, Forfeitures and Distribution thereof, and all other Matters and Things contained in any Act or Acts in force at the Time of passing of this Act, relating to the Post Office, or any Rates or Duties payable on the Port or Conveyance of Letters or Packets and not repealed or altered by this Act, shall, so far as the same are applicable, continue in force and be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this present Act, and to the Rates and Duties hereby granted, as fully and effectually to all intents and Purposes as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in the Body of this Act.

III. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise by the Rates and Duties aforesaid ( except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Management and Collection of the same ) shall be paid into the Receipt of the Exchequer at Westminster, and be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

IV. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall be at any Time or Times sued, molested or prosecuted for any Thing by him, her, or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the Special Matter in Evidence for his, her, or their Defence ; and if upon the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Cost awarded to him, her, or them, against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

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Act, 7 & 8 George IV, Cap. 6 - March 21, 1827

An Act for granting to His Majesty Rates of Postage on the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to and from Saint Domingo and Cuba.
[ 21st March 1827 ]

WHEREAS by an Act passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty, intituled An Act for granting to His Majesty Rates of Postage on the Conveyance of Letters and Packets to and from Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America, reciting, that it might be expedient that Packet Boats should be established to His Majesty’s Colonies, and also to other Foreign Parts where Rates of Postage had not hitherto been authorized, and that at the Time of establishing such Packet Boats, Parliament might not be sitting, and no Rates of Postage could in such Case be authorized by Law for the Port and Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the same ; it was therefore enacted, that from and after the Establishment of any such Packet Boats to any of His Majesty’s Colonies or other Foreign Parts, it should be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, with the Consent of the Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, or any Three of them, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs, and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that should be carried or conveyed by such Packet Boats which might hereafter be established as hereinbefore mentioned, such Rates of Packet Postage as should be equal in proportion to the Rates by the now reciting Act made payable for the Port or Conveyance of Letters and Packets to and from Buenos Ayres, or any other Port or Ports on the Continent of South America ; and it was further enacted, that as soon as conveniently might be after the next Session of Parliament succeeding the Establishment of such Rates as aforesaid, the Receipt of such Packet Rates of Postage as might then be judged necessary and expedient should be by such Session of Parliament authorized by Law : And Whereas since the last Session of Parliament it hath been found expedient, for the Convenience and Improvement of Trade and Commerce, to establish Packet Boats between the Port of Falmouth in this Kingdom, and certain Ports in the Islands of Saint Domingo and Cuba in the West Indies ; and such Packet Boats have been established accordingly : And Whereas it is expedient that the Rates of Postage for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by Packet Boats, between the several Places aforesaid, be authorized by Law ; Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs, and Successors, at any Time after the passing of this Act to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats from or to the Port of Falmouth aforesaid, or from or to any other convenient Port in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, to or from any Port or Ports in the Island of Saint Domingo in the West Indies, ( over and above all other Rates payable for the Conveyance of such Letters and Packets within the said United Kingdom, ) a Packet Postage according to the Rates and Sums, in Sterling Money, hereinafter mentioned ; ( that is to say ),

For every Single Letter, One Shilling and Three Pence :
For every Double Letter, Two Shillings and Sixpence :
For every Treble Letter, Three Shillings and Nine Pence :
And for every Ounce in Weight, Five Shillings ; and so in proportion for every Packet or Letter above the Weight of an Ounce :

And for the Port and Conveyance of all and every the Letters and Packets that shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats from or to the said Port of Falmouth, or from or to any other convenient Port in the said United Kingdom, to or from any Port or Ports in the Island of Cuba in the West Indies, ( over and above all other Rates payable for the Conveyance of such Letters and Packets within the said United Kingdom, ) a Packet Postage according to the Rates and Sums, in Sterling Money, hereinafter mentioned ; ( that is to say ),

For every Single Letter, Two Shillings and One Penny :
For every Double Letter, Four Shillings and Two Pence :
For every Treble Letter, Six Shillings and Three Pence :

And for every Ounce in Weight, Eight Shillings and Four Pence ; and so in proportion for every Packet or Letter above the Weight of an Ounce.

II. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates of Postage, chargeable and payable under and by virtue of this Act for the Port of Letters and Packets from the said United Kingdom to Saint Domingo or Cuba aforesaid, shall, in addition to and together with any Inland Rates to which such Letters and Packets may be liable, be paid on putting the same into the Post Office of the Town or Place in Great Britain or Ireland, from whence any such Letter is intended to be sent by the Post.

III. And be it further enacted, That all and every the Clauses, Provisions, Powers, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, Forfeitures, and Distribution thereof, and all other Matters and Things contained in any Act or Acts of Parliament in force at the Time of the passing of this Act, relating to the Post Office, or any Rates or Duties payable on the Port or Conveyance of Letters or Packets, and not repealed or altered by this Act, shall, so far as the same are applicable, continue in force and be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this present Act, and to the Rates and Duties hereby granted, as fully and effectually, to all Intents and Purposes, as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in the Body of this Act.

IV. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise by the Rates and Duties aforesaid ( except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expences as shall be incurred in the Management and Collection of the same ) shall be paid into the Receipt of the Exchequer at Westminster, and be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

V. And be it further enacted, That if any Person or Persons shall be at any Time or Times sued, molested, or prosecuted, for any Thing by him, her, or them done or executed in pursuance of this Act, or of any Clause, Matter, or Thing herein contained, such Person and Persons shall and may plead the General Issue, and give the Special Matter in Evidence for his, her, or their Defence ; and if upon the Trial a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant or Defendants, or the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall become nonsuited, then such Defendant or Defendants shall have Treble Costs awarded to him, her, or them, against such Plaintiff or Plaintiffs.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 7 & 8 George IV, Cap. 21 - May 28, 1827

An Act to amend the Laws relating to the Duties of Postage in Great Britain and Ireland.
[ 28th May 1827 ]

WHEREAS by the Laws now in force imposing certain Rates of Postage in Great Britain and Ireland respectively, Letters conveyed by the Post from Places in Great Britain to Places in Ireland, or from Places in Ireland to Places in Great Britain, are, by reason of the separate Rates payable in each of those Parts of the United Kingdom, charged to higher Amount upon the whole than Letters conveyed the same Distances in Great Britain would be charged : And whereas it is expedient that such Difference of Charge, affecting exclusively the Correspondence between Great Britain Ireland, should no longer exist ; Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, in lieu of all Duties of Postage granted and made payable under any Act or Acts in force in Great Britain and Ireland respectively, upon Letters so conveyed from either of these Parts of the United Kingdom to the other, there shall be levied and paid the like Rates of Postage, according to the Distances which such Letters are conveyed, as would be payable on the Conveyance of Letters from Place to Place in Great Britain, in addition to the separate Rates of Packet Postage now payable, and also to the several Rates of Duty payable under the Acts for building the Menai and Conway Bridges respectively ; the whole being according to the Schedule ( A ) to this Act annexed.

II. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, no other Packet Postage shall in any Case be demanded or paid or payable for Letters or Packets between Great Britain and Ireland, other than such as is specified and set forth in the Schedule ( A. ) to this Act annexed ; and that from and after the said Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, all Rates or Duties of Packet Postage between Great Britain and Ireland, under any Act or Acts passed at any Time before the passing of this Act, shall cease and determine, and shall be and are hereby repealed, and shall no longer be paid or payable ; any thing in any Act or Acts to the contrary in anywise notwithstanding.

III. And Whereas certain Rates of Postage upon Letters and Packets conveyed by the Post to and from Places within Ireland were granted by an Act of the Fifty fourth Year of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act to repeal certain Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post within Ireland, and to grant other Duties in lieu thereof ; and such Rates of Postage were made payable in Irish Currency : And Whereas by an Act passed in the Sixth Year of His present Majesty’s Reign intituled An Act to provide for the Assimilation of the Currency and Monies of Account throughout the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, certain Provisions are made for the Payment of Sums under the Amount of Twelve Pence of the Currency of Ireland, by an equivalent Number of British Pence, Halfpence, and Farthings, some of which are not generally in Circulation in Ireland ; and in order to avoid the Inconvenience of collecting the Rates of Postage in Ireland according to the Directions of the said last-recited Act, it is expedient that such Rates of Postage should be in future charged and collected in the Currency of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland ; Be it therefore enacted, That the several Rates of Postage upon Letters and Packets sent and conveyed to and from Places within Ireland, which by the said hereinbefore recited Act of the Fifty fourth Year of the Reign of His said late Majesty are made payable, according to the several Amounts thereof, in Irish Currency, shall, from and after the said Fifth Day of July, be charged, levied, collected, and paid and payable, according to the several Amounts thereof, in the Currency and lawful Money of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, according to the Schedule ( B. ) to this Act annexed.

IV. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs, and Successors, to demand and receive for the Conveyance of printed Votes and Proceedings in Parliament, by Packet Boats, from Great Britain and Ireland to any of His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas, after the Rate of One Penny Halfpenny, and no more, for every Ounce Weight thereof, and so in proportion, in lieu of any Sum payable under any Act or Acts in force immediately before the passing of this Act, any thing in any Act or Acts to the contrary notwithstanding ; the same to be paid when the said printed Votes and Proceedings shall be put into the Post Office ; provided every such printed Vote and Proceeding shall be without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides ; and that there be no Writing thereon other than the Superscription ; and that there be no other Paper or Thing inclosed or concealed therein.

V. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies, in His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas, to receive any Votes, Proceedings, or other Public Papers, printed by Order or under the Authority of the Legislative Assemblies of any such Colonies or Possessions, for Conveyance by Packet Boats to Great Britain and Ireland ; and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy or Deputies, in Great Britain and Ireland, to and for the Use of His Majesty, his Heirs, and Successors, to demand and receive for the Conveyance of every such Vote, Proceeding, or other printed Paper, after the Rate of One Penny Halfpenny for every Ounce Weight thereof, and so in proportion ; to be paid on Delivery thereof to the Person or Persons to whom the same shall be addressed in Great Britain or Ireland ; provided every such Paper shall be without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides, and that there be no Writing thereon other than the Superscription ; and that there be no other Paper or Thing inclosed or concealed therein.

VI. And Whereas Newspapers printed within His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas, brought into Great Britain and Ireland by Ships other than Packets, and sent to the Post Office of the Port or Place at which the Letters brought by such Ships are landed, are now liable to the same Rates and Duties of Postage as Letters ; and it is expedient that the Law in this respect should be amended ; Be it therefore enacted, That from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General in Great Britain and Ireland, and for his Deputy and Deputies, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs, and Successors, to demand and receive, for the Conveyance of every such Paper by any Ship other than a Packet, and delivered by the Commander of any such Ship at any Post Office with the Ship’s Letters, the Sum, of Three Pence, on the Delivery thereof to the Person or Persons to whom the same shall be addressed ; provided every such Paper be sent without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides ; and that there be no Writing thereon other than the Superscription ; and that there be no other Paper or Thing inclosed or concealed therein.

VII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy or Deputies, to receive at the Port of Falmouth any Pamphlet, Magazine, Review, or other periodical Publication, for Conveyance by Packet Boat to any of His Majesty’s Colonies or Plantations ; and to demand, have, receive, and take for the Conveyance of every such Pamphlet, Magazine, Review, or Publication, not exceeding Six Ounces in Weight, the Sum of One Shilling, and the further Sum of Three Pence per Ounce for any Weight beyond the Weight of Six Ounces ; every Fraction of an Ounce to be charged as One Ounce : Provided always, that every such Pamphlet, Magazine, Review, and Publication be sent without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides ; and that there be no Writing thereon other than the Superscription ; and that there be no other Paper or Thing inclosed or concealed therein.

VIII. And Whereas Letters from or to any Place in Great Britain, sent to or directed from Howth near Dublin, or Dunmore near Waterford, are contained in the Mails landed at or dispatched from Dublin and Waterford, respectively, and are carried in such Mail to and from Dublin and Waterford, from and to Howth and Dunmore, and are by such means subject to increased Postage, although no Benefit is derived from such Conveyance ; Be it therefore enacted, That from and after the fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, Letters and Packets from or to any Place in Great Britain, directed to or sent from Howth or Dunmore, or within the Delivery and Vicinity thereof respectively, shall not be chargeable with or subject or liable to any Increase of Postage in respect of being so carried to or from Dublin or Waterford, nor to any other or greater Amount of Postage than according to the actual Distance between Howth and Dunmore respectively, and the Town or Place in Great Britain from or to which they shall be sent, according to the Rates specified in Table ( A. ) annexed to this Act.

IX. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, it shall and may be lawful for the Postmaster General of Great Britain, and he is hereby authorized and empowered, to apply to the Revenue of the Post Office of Great Britain the Amount of all Rates of Postage received in Great Britain upon Letters sent from or to Ireland ; and that in like Manner it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General of Ireland, and he is hereby authorized and empowered, to apply to the Revenue of the Post Office of Ireland the Amount of all Rates of Postage received in Ireland upon Letters and Packets sent from or to Great Britain ; and that all Sums so received shall be paid and applied as the Revenue of Postage arising in Great Britain or Ireland respectively ; any thing in any Act or Acts, or any Law, Usage, or Custom, to the contrary notwithstanding.

X. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Fifth Day of July One thousand eight hundred and twenty seven, so much of an Act made in the Parliament of Great Britain in the Twenty fourth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act for establishing certain Regulations concerning the Portage and Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the Post between Great Britain and Ireland, whereby it is enacted, that there shall be allowed in account from the General Letter Office or Post Office in Great Britain to the Revenue of the Post Office in Ireland, a Sum not exceeding Four thousand Pounds per Annum ; and also an Act made in the Fifty fifth Year of the Reign of His said late Majesty, intituled An Act to increase the Allowance to the Post Office in Ireland in respect of Packet Boats to Great Britain, shall be and the same are hereby repealed.

XI. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise by the several Rates and Duties made payable by this Act, except the Monies which shall be necessary to defray such Expence as shall be incurred in the Management and Collection of the same, shall be paid into the Receipt of the Exchequer at Westminster and Dublin, and shall be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

XII. And be it further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act, every printed Newspaper or other printed Paper liable to the Stamp Duty, and for the Conveyance of which any Duty of Postage is chargeable under any Act or Acts in force in Great Britain or Ireland, shall and may in all Cases be put into the Post Office or Receiving Office of or for the Town or Place in Great Britain or Ireland in or at which such Newspaper shall be published, on any Day within Seven Days next after the Day on which the same shall be published, the Day of Publication to be ascertained by the Date of such Paper, any thing in any Act to the contrary notwithstanding ; and in case any such Paper shall be put into any Post Office at any Time after the Expiration of such Seven Days, such Paper shall be charged with a Rate of Postage equal to that of a Single Letter sent by the Post from the Place where such Paper was published to the Place to which such Paper shall be addressed.

XIII. And Whereas, by the Laws in force, Merchants’ Accounts, Bills of Exchange, Invoices, Bills of Lading, and Proceedings at Law, written on one and the same Piece of Paper with a Letter, and also several Letters to several and distinct Persons, written upon one and the same Piece of Paper, are liable to be rated, taxed, and paid for as so many several and distinct Letters ; and it is expedient that the Laws in this respect should be altered ; Be it therefore enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act, all Merchants’ Accounts, Bills of Exchange, Stamped Receipts, Invoices, Bills of Lading, and Proceedings at Law, written on one and the same Piece of Paper with a Letter, shall be allowed and taken without Rate in the Price of the Letter ; and that any Piece or Sheet of Paper upon which Letters to several and distinct Persons shall be written, shall not be charged or chargeable with any higher Rate of Postage in Great Britain or Ireland than if One Letter only were written upon such Sheet or Piece of Paper ; any thing in any Act or Acts to the contrary notwithstanding.

XIV. And for the more effectually preventing the Detention of Letters on board Ships and Vessels coming to Great Britain and Ireland from Parts beyond the Seas, and the Injury and Inconvenience resulting to Merchants and others therefrom, be it enacted, That it shall be lawful to and for any Person or Persons, thereunto duly authorized and appointed by the Postmaster General of Great Britain or by the Postmaster General of Ireland, to demand and receive from the Master, Commander, or other Person having the Charge of any Ship or Vessel arriving at or off any Port in Great Britain or Ireland, all such Letters and Packets on board the same as are not exempted by Law ; and the Master or Commander, or other Person having the Charge of any such Ship or Vessel, is hereby required forthwith to deliver such Letters and Packets to the Person or Persons authorized to demand and receive the same ; and it shall be lawful for the Master, Commander, or other Person having the Charge of such Ship or Vessel, to retain on board any Letters or Packets exceeding the Weight of Three Ounces, until his Arrival at the regular Port or Place of Discharge of such Vessel, any thing in any Act or Acts to the contrary notwithstanding ; and in case any Letter or Packet not exceeding the Weight of Three Ounces, not being exempted by Law, shall be found on board any such Ship or Vessel, or in the Possession of the Master or Commander, or of any of the Passengers or Crew, at any Time after the Time when Letters shall have been demanded or delivered as aforesaid, every and any Penalty payable by Law in respect of Letters found in the Possession of the Master of any Ship or Vessel after delivering his Letters at the Post Office of any Port at which he may touch prior to his arriving at the Port where the Ship or Vessel is to report, or in the Possession of any of the Crew, or in the Possession or Baggage of any Passenger on board, shall attach and be payable in respect of every Letter or Packet, not exceeding the Weight of Three Ounces, which shall be so found after such Demand and Delivery as is required by this Act ; and every such Penalty shall be paid and payable by Person or Persons in whose Possession or Baggage any such Letter or Packet shall be discovered, and may be sued for, recovered, and applied in such Manner as is directed with respect to such Penalties by any Act or Acts in force in Great Britain or Ireland relating to the Duties of Postage.

XV. And be it further enacted, That whenever it shall that any Letter shall be addressed to any Commissioned Officer of the Army, Navy, or Ordnance, or any of the Departments belonging thereto respectively, at any Place where such Officer shall have been employed on actual Service, and that before Delivery of such Letter such Officer shall have removed from such Place in the Execution of his Duty in the Public Service, such Letter shall not be charged with any Postage for the Conveyance of the same to any Place at which such Letter be ultimately delivered, above or beyond the Rate of payable for the same on Delivery at the Place to which such Letter was originally directed.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That all the Powers, Provisions, Privileges, Advantages, Disabilities, Penalties, Forfeitures and Distribution thereof, and all Clauses and other Matters and Things contained in any Act or Acts in force at the Time of the passing of this Act, relating to the Post Office, or any Rates or Duties payable on the Port or Conveyance of Letters or Packets in Great Britain and Ireland, and not repealed or altered by this Act, shall, so far as the same are applicable, continue in force, and be applied and extended, and shall be construed to apply and extend to this present Act, and to the Rates and Duties hereby made payable, as fully and effectually to all Intents and Purposes as if the same had been particularly repeated and re-enacted in the Body of this Act.

XVII. Provided always, and be it enacted, That so much and such Parts of an Act made in the Fifty fifth Year of the Reign His late Majesty, intituled An Act to regulate the Postage of Ship Letters to and from Ireland, as except or refer to Great Britain, shall be and the same are hereby repealed.

XVIII. And Whereas by an Act made in the Fifty third Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, among other Things, for making further Regulations for securing the Duties on Letters and Packets sent by the Post in Ireland, certain Penalties or Forfeitures of Ten Pounds are imposed for certain Offences against the said Act : And Whereas Doubts have arisen whether the said Penalties continue in force, and are recoverable according to the Directions of the said Act ; Be it therefore declared and enacted, That the said Act, and the said Penalties thereby inflicted, are and shall remain and continue in force ; and that such Penalties of Ten Pounds shall and may be recovered, on Conviction of the Offender, in manner by the said recited Act directed ; any thing in any Act or Acts to the contrary notwithstanding.

XIX. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be amended, altered, or repealed by any Act or Acts to be passed in this present Session of Parliament.

SCHEDULE ( A. )
RATES of POSTAGE to be taken in the Currency of the United Kingdom for the Port and Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the Post from any Place in Great Britain to any Place in Ireland, or from any Place in Ireland to any Place in Great Britain.

If the Distance of such Places shall not exceed 15 Miles, British Measure

Single Letter : 0s 4d
Double Letter : 0s 8d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 1s 0d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 1s 4d
If such Distance shall exceed 15 and shall not exceed 20 such Miles

Single Letter : 0s 5d
Double Letter : 0s 10d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 1s 3d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 1s 8d
If such Distance shall exceed 20 and shall not exceed 30 such Miles

Single Letter : 0s 6d
Double Letter : 1s 0d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 1s 6d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 2s 0d
If such Distance shall exceed 30 and shall not exceed 50 such Miles

Single Letter : 0s 7d
Double Letter : 1s 2d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 1s 9d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 2s 4d
If such Distance shall exceed 50 and shall not exceed 80 such Miles

Single Letter : 0s 8d
Double Letter : 1s 4d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 2s 0d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 2s 8d
If such Distance shall exceed 80 and shall not exceed 120 such Miles

Single Letter : 0s 9d
Double Letter : 1s 6d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 2s 3d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 3s 0d
If such Distance shall exceed 120 and shall not exceed 170 such Miles

Single Letter : 0s 10d
Double Letter : 1s 8d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 2s 6d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 3s 4d
If such Distance shall exceed 170 and shall not exceed 230 such Miles

Single Letter : 0s 11d
Double Letter : 1s 10d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 2s 9d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 3s 8d
If such Distance shall exceed 230 and shall not exceed 300 such Miles

Single Letter : 1s 0d
Double Letter : 2s 0d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 3s 0d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 4s 0d
If such Distance shall exceed 300 and shall not exceed 400 such Miles

Single Letter : 1s 1d
Double Letter : 2s 2d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 3s 3d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 4s 4d
If such Distance shall exceed 400 and shall not exceed 500 such Miles

Single Letter : 1s 2d
Double Letter : 2s 4d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 3s 6d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 4s 8d
If such Distance shall exceed 500 and shall not exceed 600 such Miles

Single Letter : 1s 3d
Double Letter : 2s 6d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 3s 9d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 5s 0d
If such Distance shall exceed 600 and shall not exceed 700 such Miles

Single Letter : 1s 4d
Double Letter : 2s 8d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 4s 0d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 5s 4d
If such Distance shall exceed 700 such Miles

Single Letter : 1s 5d
Double Letter : 2s 10d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 4s 3d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 5s 8d
Letters and Packets conveyed by Packet Boats between the Ports of Portpatrick and Donaghadee, a Packet Postage over and above all other Rates

Single Letter : 0s 4d
Double Letter : 0s 8d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 1s 0d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 1s 4d
Letters and Packets conveyed by Packet Boats from or to Holyhead or Milford Haven, to or from any Port in Ireland, a Packet Postage over and above all other Rates

Single Letter : 0s 2d
Double Letter : 0s 4d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 0s 6d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 0s 8d
Letters and Packets conveyed by Packet Boats to or from Liverpool, from or to Dublin, any other Port in Ireland, a Packet Postage over and above all other Rates. Provided that no Letter sent by way of Liverpool shall be chargeable with higher Rate of Postage than if it were sent by way of Holyhead

Single Letter : 0s 8d
Double Letter : 1s 4d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 2s 0d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 2s 8d
Letters and Packets to and from any Part of Great Britain or Ireland, by way of Dublin and Holyhead, in addition to all other Rates (Menai Bridge)

Single Letter : 0s 1d
Double Letter : 0s 2d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 0s 3d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 0s 4d
Letters and Packets to and from any Part of Great Britain or Ireland, by way of Conway and Chester, in addition to all other Rates (Conway Bridge). And so in proportion in all the aforesaid Cases for any other Letter or Packet of greater Weight than an Ounce

Single Letter : 0s 1d
Double Letter : 0s 2d
Treble Letter, or other, under an Ounce Weight : 0s 3d
For every Ounce Weight, and for every Packet not exceeding an Ounce in Weight : 0s 4d

SCHEDULE ( B. )
RATES of POSTAGE to be taken in the Currency of the United Kingdom for the Port and Conveyance of Letters by the Post to and from Places within Ireland, instead of the Rates in Irish Currency under 54 Geo. 3 c. 119.

For every Single Letter or Piece of Paper, from the Office in Ireland where such Letter or Piece of Paper shall be put in :

To any Distance within Ireland not exceeding 7 Miles, Irish Measure : 0s 2d

To any Distance exceeding 7 Miles, and not exceeding 15 Miles : 0s 3d

To any Distance exceeding 15 Miles, and not exceeding 25 Miles : 0s 4d

To any Distance exceeding 25 Miles, and not exceeding 35 Miles : 0s 5d

To any Distance exceeding 35 Miles, and not exceeding 45 Miles : 0s 6d

To any Distance exceeding 45 Miles, and not exceeding 55 Miles : 0s 7d

To any Distance exceeding 55 Miles, and not exceeding 65 Miles : 0s 8d

To any Distance exceeding 65 Miles, and not exceeding 95 Miles : 0s 9d

To any Distance exceeding 95 Miles, and not exceeding 120 Miles : 0s 10d

To any Distance exceeding 120 Miles, and not exceeding 150 Miles : 0s 11d

To any Distance exceeding 150 Miles, and not exceeding 200 Miles : 1s 0d

To any Distance exceeding 200 Miles, and not exceeding 250 Miles : 1s 1d

To any Distance exceeding 250 Miles, and not exceeding 300 Miles : 1s 2d

For every Distance of 100 Miles, Irish Measure, above 300 Miles, a further Sum of : 0s 1d

And for the Port and Conveyance of any Double Letter, Double the said Sums respectively ; and for every Treble Letter, Treble the said Sums respectively ; and so in proportion for any greater Weight than One Ounce, reckoning every Quarter of an Ounce equal to a Single Letter.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 2 William IV, Cap. 15 - March 24, 1832

An Act to enable His Majesty’s Postmaster General to extend the Accommodation by Post, and to regulate the Privilege of Franking, in Ireland ; and for other Purposes relating to the Post Office.
[ 24th March 1832 ]

WHEREAS an Act passed by the Parliament of the Kingdom of Ireland, in the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act for establishing a Post Office within this Kingdom : And whereas an Act passed in the Fifty-ninth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act to amend several Acts relating to the Post Office and Conveyance of Letters in Ireland : And whereas an Act passed in the First Year of the Reign of His present Majesty King William the Fourth, intituled An Act for enabling His Majesty to appoint a Postmaster General for the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland : And whereas by the Laws now in force the Postmaster General for the Time being is authorized to settle and establish an Office, to be called the Penny Post Office, in any City or Town, and the Suburbs thereof, and Places adjacent, within Great Britain, where such Post shall by the Postmaster General be adjudged necessary and convenient ; and it is expedient that such Power or Authority should be extended to that Part of the United Kingdom called Ireland ; be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That after the passing of this Act His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and his Deputy and Deputies, Agent and Agents, by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, may settle and establish an Office to be called the Penny Post Office in any City, Town, or Village, and the Suburbs thereof, and Places adjacent, within Ireland aforesaid, where such Post shall by the Postmaster General be adjudged necessary and convenient, and may demand and take for the Postage and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets conveyed by such Penny Post the Sum of One Penny.

II. And be it further enacted, That all Letters and Packets which shall be sent to or delivered from any General Post Office by any Penny Post shall be chargeable with the Penny Post Rate aforesaid, over and above the Rates of Postage of such Letters or Packets by the General Post.

III. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise from the said Rate of One Penny shall, after defraying the Expences incurred, be deemed Part of the Revenue of the General Post Office in Ireland, and be applied in such Manner as the present Rates of Postage in Ireland are by Law applicable.

IV. And be it further enacted, That no Letter or Packet shall be forwarded by any Penny Post so to be established which shall exceed the Weight of Four Ounces, other than such as have first come by the General Post Office, or shall be passing by the Penny Post unto the General Post.

V. And be it further enacted, That when any such Penny Post Office shall be established as aforesaid, every Person who shall, for any Hire, Reward, or Emolument, collect or receive Letters or Packets for Delivery, or send or convey any Letters or Packets from or to any City, Town, Village, Suburb, or Place or Street within or near to any such Penny Post Office, without the Licence of the Postmaster General for the Time being, shall be subject to all the Penalties and Forfeitures in force relating to Persons collecting, receiving, sending, carrying, re-carrying, and delivering Letters contrary to any Act or Acts of Parliament in force as to the Post Office in Ireland.

VI. And be it further enacted, That after the passing of this Act His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being may undertake, at the Expence of the Revenue of the Post Office of Ireland, the Conveyance and Delivery of Letters and Packets directed to Persons abiding in Towns, Villages, and Places in Ireland, ( not being Post Towns, ) from the respective Post Towns to which such Letters shall be carried by the Post in the usual Manner, and also the Collection and Conveyance of Letters and Packets in and from such Towns, Villages, and Places, in order to be sent by the Post, and also the Collection, Conveyance, and Delivery of Letters and Packets in from, and to Towns, Villages, and Places in Ireland, ( not being respectively Post Towns, ) and to take such Sum and Sums of Money, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, for such Services, as shall from Time to Time be mutually agreed upon between the Postmaster General and the Inhabitants of such Towns, Villages, and Places respectively.

VII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein-before contained shall extend or be construed to extend to hinder or prevent the Inhabitants of any such Towns, Villages, and Places respectively from carrying or re-carrying, or employing any Messenger, Servant, or other Person to carry or re-carry, any Letters or Packets to or from the Post Towns in such Manner as they have heretofore been accustomed and are by Law authorized.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That the Monies to arise and be received for such Services as last aforesaid shall, after paying the Expences incurred, be applied in such Manner as the present Rates of Postage in Ireland are by Law applicable.

IX. And be it further enacted, That after the passing of this Act His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being may, in his Discretion, enter into any Agreement or Agreements with, or take Security from, any Person or Persons applying to him for that Purpose, for indemnifying His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, in whole or in part, and for such Time as the Postmaster General may think necessary, against the Expences which shall or may be incurred beyond the Rates of Postage by extending the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by Post to or from any Place or Places in Ireland, where such Conveyance shall be extended at the Request of such Person or Persons, and it shall appear doubtful to the Postmaster General whether by extending the said Conveyance an additional Expence to the Revenue may not be incurred.

X. And be it further enacted, That His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto sufficiently authorized, may contract and agree for the Conveyance of Mails of Letters by any British Ships or Vessels to or from any Port or Place whatsoever, and to forward the same accordingly, and to demand and take, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, for such Conveyance, the like Rates of Postage, and to exercise and enforce the like Powers for compelling Payment of the same, as if such Letters and Packets had been conveyed by regular Packet Boats.

XI. And be it further enacted, That every Person who shall steal or unlawfully take away any Bag or Mail of Letters sent or to be sent by any Ship or Vessel so to be employed for the Conveyance of Mails of Letters and Packets as last aforesaid, or shall steal or unlawfully take any Letter or Packet out of any such Bag or Mail, or shall unlawfully open any such Bag or Mail, shall, upon being convicted thereof, be adjudged guilty of Felony, and shall be liable, at the Discretion of the Court, to be transported beyond the Seas for any Term not exceeding Fourteen Years nor less than Seven Years, or to be imprisoned for any Term not exceeding Three Years ; and when any such Felony shall be committed within the Jurisdiction of the Admiralty of England, the same shall be dealt with, inquired of, tried, and determined in the same Manner as any other Felony committed within that Jurisdiction.

XII. And be it further enacted, That after the passing of this Act no Person or Body Politic or Corporate in any Part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain or Ireland shall receive, take up, despatch, convey, carry, or deliver, or shall send, or cause to be sent or conveyed, or tender or deliver in order to be sent or conveyed, ( otherwise than by the Post, or by and with the Authority and Consent of His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, or his Deputy or Deputies, ) any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets, by any Ship or Vessel by which His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, or his Deputy or Deputies, shall contract or agree for the forwarding of any Mail or Mails of Letters, under or by virtue of the Authority herein contained, on pain of forfeiting for each and every Letter, whether such Letter shall be received, taken up, ordered, despatched, conveyed, carried, or delivered, or sent or caused to be sent or conveyed, or tendered or delivered in order to be sent or conveyed, separately or by itself, or together with any other Letter or Letters or other Matter or Thing whatsoever, the Sum of Five Pounds.

XIII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing lastly herein-before contained shall extend to subject any Person or Body Politic or Corporate to any such Penalty or Forfeiture in respect of any Letter or Letters which shall be sent with or shall relate to any Goods on board any such Ship or Vessel and entered on the Ship’s Manifest.

XIV. And be it further enacted, That any Collector, Comptroller, or other Officer of His Majesty’s Customs, at any Port or Place whatsoever, may and they are hereby authorized and required to search every Ship or Vessel in any Port or Place for Letters or Packets which may be on board contrary to the Provisions of this Act, and to seize and take all such Letters and Packets, and to forward the same to the Postmaster General or his Deputy at the Port or Place.

XV. And be it further enacted, That in all Cases of such Seizure the Penalty or Penalties imposed by this Act in respect of any such Letters or Packets which may be found on board any such Ships or Vessels contrary to the Provisions of this Act shall and may be recoverable from the Person or Persons writing or sending or carrying any such Letter or Packet, or from the Owner or Owners or Commander of any such Ship or Vessel, at the Option of the Person or Persons suing for the same ; and in all Cases of such Seizure the Proof shall lie on the Person or Persons so proceeded against, that the Provisions of this Act have been complied with.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That one Moiety of the several pecuniary Penalties herein-before imposed shall be payable to the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, and the other Moiety to the Use of the Person who shall inform or sue for the same, to be sued for and recovered, with full Costs of Suit, by any Person who shall and will inform and sue for the same, in any of His Majesty’s Courts of Record at Westminster for Offences committed within that Part of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland called England, and in any of His Majesty’s Courts of Record in Dublin for Offences committed in Ireland, and before the Sheriff or Steward Court of the Shire or Stewartry within which the Parties offending shall reside, or the Offence shall be committed, for Offences committed in Scotland.

XVII. And whereas an Act passed in the Fifty-third Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act to repeal certain Rates and Duties upon Letters and Packets sent by the Post from or to Dublin to or from the several Post Towns in Ireland, and to grant other Rates and Duties in lieu thereof ; and to make further Regulations for securing the Duties on Letters and Packets sent by the Post in Ireland : And whereas an Act passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth, intituled An Act to regulate the Conveyance of Packets containing re-issuable Country Bank Notes by the Post, and to charge Rates of Postage thereon ; to prevent Letters and Packets being sent otherwise than by the Post ; to punish Persons embezzling printed Proceedings in Parliament, or Newspapers ; and to allow the President of the Commissioners of Revenue Inquiry to send and receive Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage : And whereas Doubts have arisen whether so much of the said Act passed in the Fifty-third Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third as relates to and imposes Penalties on Persons, not legally authorized, receiving, taking up, carrying or re-carrying, conveying, or delivering Letters or Packets, or setting up or employing any Foot, Horse, or other Post, or any Carriage or Vessel, for such Purpose, by Sea or Land, or on any River or Canal, or in any Stage Coach or Public Carriage, has not been virtually repealed by the said Act passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth ; and it is expedient that such Doubts should be removed ; be it therefore declared and enacted, That the said recited Act made and passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth, and the said Provisions and Penalties therein contained for the Protection of the Rates and Duties of Postage, shall not be deemed, construed, or adjudged to have in anywise revoked, altered, annulled, or varied, but that the same shall in all respects be in full force, virtue, and effect, in Ireland, as if the said recited Act passed in the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth had not been passed ; and that all and singular the Powers and Authorities by the said Act passed in the Fifty-third Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third given to or vested in the Postmaster General of Ireland nominated or appointed under the said Act passed by the Parliament of Ireland in the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third shall in all respects vest in and be exercisable by His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being appointed or to be appointed under or by virtue of the said Act passed in the First Year of the Reign of His present Majesty King William the Fourth.

XVIII. And be it further enacted, That in any Action, Suit, Bill, Plaint, or Information which shall at any Time after the passing of this Act be commenced, in Great Britain or Ireland, against any Person or Persons, for receiving, taking up, ordering, despatching, collecting, carrying, conveying, delivering, or sending, or causing to be sent or conveyed, or tendering or delivering in order to be sent or conveyed, otherwise than by the Post, any Letter or Packet, Letters or Packets, contrary to the Provisions in an Act made in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Her late Majesty Queen Anne, intituled An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenue thereof for the Service of the War and other Her Majesty’s Occasions, or contrary to the Provisions of the said recited Acts of the Twenty-third and Twenty-fourth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, or contrary to the Provisions contained in an Act passed in the Forty-second Year of the Reign of His said late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act for amending so much of an Act passed in the Seventh Year of the Reign of His Majesty as relates to the secreting, embezzling, or destroying any Letter or Packet sent by the Post, and for the better Protection of such Letters and Packets, and for more effectually preventing Letters and Packets being sent otherwise than by the Post, or contrary to the Provisions of the said recited Acts of the Fifty-third Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third and the Fifth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth, or any or either of them, or contrary to the Provisions of any or either of the several Acts of Parliament in the said last-mentioned Acts recited or referred to, or contrary to the Provisions of this Act, the Proof that the Letter or Packet, Letters or Packets, was or were received, taken up, ordered, despatched, collected, carried, conveyed, delivered, or sent, or tendered, or delivered in order to be sent or conveyed, according to the Provisions contained in the said last-mentioned Acts or one of them, or according to the Provisions contained in this present Act, as the Case may require, shall lie on the Person or Persons against whom such Action, Suit, Bill, Plaint, or Information shall be brought for receiving, taking up, ordering, despatching, collecting, conveying, delivering, or sending, or tendering, or delivering the same.

XIX. And be it further enacted, That so much and such Parts of the said recited Act of the Fifty-ninth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third as relates to the Postage and Conveyance of printed Notices, Letters, and Papers by the Post, relating to the Affairs of any Charitable Institution or Society in Ireland, at reduced Rates of Postage, shall be and the same is and are hereby repealed.

XX. And whereas under and by virtue of divers Acts of Parliament the several Public Officers, Commissioners, and Persons in Ireland mentioned or referred to in and by the Schedule hereunto annexed ( some of them under certain Regulations and Restrictions ) have exercised the Privilege of sending and receiving Letters and Packets by the Post free from the Duty of Postage : And whereas it is expedient that the Privilege of Franking by Public Officers in Ireland should be placed under further Regulations ; be it therefore enacted, That after the passing of this Act the Privilege of sending and receiving Letters and Packets by the Post free from the Duty of Postage heretofore granted to, and now or lately used and exercised by, the several and respective Public Officers, Commissioners, and Persons mentioned or referred to in the Schedule hereunto annexed, or any of them, shall be and the same is hereby repealed.

XXI. And be it further enacted, That His Majesty’s Lieutenant General or other Chief Governor or Governors of Ireland, and his or their Chief Secretary, Under Secretary, and Private Secretary respectively, and the Secretary of His Majesty’s Postmaster General, all within Ireland, for the Time being, may send and receive Letters and Packets by the General Post, free from the Duty of Postage, to and from Places within the United Kingdom.

XXII. And be it further enacted, That the Lord Chancellor of Ireland for the Time being, and the Surveyors of the Post Office in Ireland respectively for the Time being, may send and receive Letters and Packets by the General Post, to and from Places within Ireland, free from the Duty of Postage.

XXIII. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That no Letter or Packet whatsoever sent by any Public Officer to whom the Privilege of Franking is granted by this Act shall be exempt from the Payment of Postage unless the whole Superscription upon every such Letter or Packet so sent shall be of the Handwriting of the Officer or Person sending the same, and shall have indorsed thereon the Name of such Officer, together with the Name of the Post Town from which the same is intended to be sent, and the Day, Month, and Year upon which the same shall be to be put into the Post Office, the Day of the Month to be in Words at Length, and also unless every such Letter or Packet shall be put into the General Post Office or other Post Office, or into any Receiving House or Place appointed by His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Receipt of Letters and Packets, to be forwarded by the Post on the Day of the Date put upon such Letter or Packet, and unless the Officer whose Name shall be indorsed thereon shall actually be in the Post Town into the Post Office of which every such Letter or Packet shall be put, or within Twenty Miles of such Post Town, on the Day or on the Day before the Day on which such Letter or Packet shall be put into the Post Office.

XXIV. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Chief Secretary of His Majesty’s Lieutenant General or other Chief Governor or Governors of Ireland to authorize and direct One Person in the Office of such Chief Secretary in London ( whose Name shall be from Time to Time transmitted by the said Chief Secretary to the Secretaries of the General Post Office in London and Dublin respectively ) to send Letters and Packets by the General Post from London to Places within the United Kingdom free of Postage ; provided that all such Letters and Packets shall relate solely and exclusively to the Business of the said Chief Secretary’s Office, and shall be in Covers, with the Words ” On His Majesty’s Service, Lord Lieutenant’s Chief Secretary’s Office, London, “ printed on the same, and be signed or subscribed on the Outside thereof, under such Words, with the Name of the Person so to be authorized as aforesaid, in his own Handwriting, and provided all such Letters and Packets shall be sealed with the Seal of the said Office ; and the Person so to be authorized is hereby strictly forbidden so to subscribe and seal any Letter or Packet whatever except such only concerning which he shall receive the special Direction of his superior Officer, or which he shall himself know to relate solely and exclusively to the Business of his Office ; and if such authorized Person or any other Person shall send, or cause or permit to be sent, under any such Cover, any Letter, Paper, or Writing, or any Enclosure, other than what shall relate to the Public Business of his Department, every Person so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of One hundred Pounds, and be dismissed from his Office.

XXV. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Commander in Chief of His Majesty’s Forces in Ireland, the Vice Treasurer of Ireland, the Deputy Adjutant General of His Majesty’s Forces, the Deputy Quartermaster General of His Majesty’s Forces, the Chief Officer of His Majesty’s Ordnance Survey, ( all within Ireland, for the Time being respectively, ) to authorize and direct One Person in each of their Departments respectively, and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General to authorize and direct One Person in the General Post Office in Dublin, and for the Chief Secretary of His Majesty’s Lieutenant General or other Chief Governor or Governors of Ireland to authorize and direct Two Persons, one in the Civil Department and the other in the Military Department of such Chief Secretary’s Office in Dublin, the Name and Names of which said several and respective Persons shall be from Time to Time transmitted by the respective Officers aforesaid to the Secretary of the General Post Office in Dublin, to send Letters and Packets by the General Post from Dublin to Places within Ireland free Postage ; provided all such Letters and Packets shall relate solely and exclusively to the Business of the said respective Departments, and shall be in Covers, with the Words, ” On His Majesty’s Service, Commander in Chief s Office, ” ” Vice Treasurer’s Office, ” ” Adjutant General’s Office, ” ” Quartermaster General’s Office, ” ” Ordnance Survey Office, ” ” General Post Office, ” ” Chief Secretary’s Office, Civil Department, ” or ” Chief’s Secretary’s Office, Military Department, ” as the Case may be, printed on the same, and be signed or subscribed on the Outside thereof, under such Words, with the Names the Persons so to be authorized as aforesaid, in their own Handwriting, and provided all such Letters and Packets shall be sealed with the Seal of the said Offices respectively ; and all the said Persons so to be authorized are hereby strictly forbidden so to subscribe and seal any Letter or Packet whatever, except such only concerning which they shall receive the special Direction of their superior Officer, or which they shall themselves know to relate solely and exclusively to the Business of their respective Departments ; and if any such authorized Person or any other Person shall send, or cause or permit to be sent, under any such Cover, any Letter, Paper, or Writing, or any Enclosure, other than what shall relate to the Public Business of their respective Departments, every Person so offending shall forfeit and pay the Sum of One hundred Pounds, and be dismissed from his Office.

XXVI. And be it further enacted, That all Letters and Packets sent from any Places within Ireland by the General Post, addressed to the Commander in Chief of His Majesty’s Forces, the Deputy Adjutant General of His Majesty’s Forces, the Deputy Quartermaster General of His Majesty’s Forces, the Military Secretary of His Majesty’s Forces, the Superintendant of the Ordnance Survey, and the Vice Treasurer of Ireland, all within Ireland, for the Time being, the said Letters and Packets being on His Majesty’s Service, and relating solely to the Business of their respective Departments, shall be delivered at their respective Offices in Dublin free from Postage.

XXVII. And be it further enacted, That if any Letter, Paper, or Thing shall be sent under Cover to any of the said last-mentioned Officers, the same not being actually and bona fide on His Majesty’s Service, and relating exclusively to the Business of their respective Departments, the Officers to whom the same shall be so sent are hereby strictly required and enjoined to transmit the same forthwith to the Secretary of the Post Office in Dublin, with the Covers under which the same were sent, in order that the Contents thereof may be charged with the full Rates of Postage.

XXVIII. And be it further enacted, That all Letters and Packets sent from any Places within the United Kingdom by the General Post, addressed to the Chief Clerk in the Office in London of the said Chief Secretary of His Majesty’s Lieutenant General or other Chief Governor or Governors of Ireland, the said Letters and Packets being all on His Majesty’s Service, and relating solely to the Business of the said Chief Secretary’s Office, shall be delivered at such Office free from Postage.

XXIX. And be it further enacted, That if any Letter, Paper, or Thing shall be sent under Cover to the said Chief Clerk, the same not being actually and bona fide on His Majesty’s Service, and relating exclusively to the Business of the said Chief Secretary’s Office, the said Chief Clerk is hereby strictly required and enjoined to transmit the same forthwith to the Secretary of the General Post Office in London, with the Covers under which the same were sent, in order that the Contents thereof may be charged with the full Rates of Postage.

XXX. And be it further enacted, That if any Person whatsoever shall forge or counterfeit the Handwriting of any Person whomsoever hereby authorized to frank any Letters or Packets, in the Superscription of any Letter or Packet to be sent by the Post, in order to avoid the Payment of the Duty of Postage, or shall forge, counterfeit, or alter, or shall procure to be forged, counterfeited, or altered, the Date of the Superscription of any such Letter or Packet, or shall write or send by the Post, or cause to be written or sent by the Post, any Letter or Packet the Superscription or Cover whereof shall be forged or counterfeited, or the Date upon such Superscription or Cover altered, in order to avoid the Payment of the Duty of Postage, knowing the same to be forged, counterfeited, or altered, every Person so offending, and being thereof convicted in due Form of Law, shall be deemed guilty of Felony, and shall be transported beyond the Seas for Seven Years.

XXXI. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General for the Time being, from Time to Time and at any Time during the Space of Two Years from and after the passing of this Act, to nominate and appoint all and every such Charitable Institutions or Societies in Ireland as the Postmaster General may in his Discretion deem it expedient should be permitted to send Letters and Packets relating solely to the Business of such Institutions or Societies, by Post, in Ireland, at a reduced Rate of Postage, with full Power for the Postmaster General for the Time being from Time to Time to revoke and annul any such Nomination or Appointment, and the Privilege thereby conferred.

XXXII. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General for the Time being, and his or their Deputy or Deputies, Servants or Agents, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take for the Postage and Conveyance of all Letters or Packets which shall relate solely and exclusively to the Affairs or Business of any such Charitable Institution or Society in Ireland so from Time to Time to be nominated or appointed by the Postmaster General for the Time being as aforesaid, and which shall at any Time within Two Years from and after the passing of this Act be delivered into any Post Office in Ireland, folded and directed, but without any Seal or Wafer or other Matter to close or fasten the same, and shall be carried, conveyed, or sent Post from the General Post Office in Dublin to the several Post Towns in Ireland, and from the several Post Towns in Ireland to the General Post Office in Dublin, at the Rate or Sum of Two-pence for every such Letter or Packet ; provided all and every such Letters and Packets shall relate solely and exclusively to the Charitable Institution or Society by or from which the same shall be forwarded, and shall be superscribed on the Outside thereof in such Manner in all respects as the Postmaster General for the Time being may, in his Discretion, from Time to Time appoint ; provided the said Letters or Packets shall contain no Cash, Bank Note, Bill of Exchange, Promissory Note, Draft, or Order for the Payment of Money, or other valuable Security, and shall contain no Writing, Communication, Matter, or Thing whatever other than on the Business of the Charitable Society or Institution by or from which the same shall be forwarded, and provided that no such Letter or Packet shall exceed the Weight of an Ounce.

XXXIII. And be it further enacted, That the Moneys to arise from the said Rate of Two-pence shall be deemed Part of the Revenue of the General Post Office in Ireland, and be applied in such Manner as the present Rates of Postage in Ireland are by Law applicable.

XXXIV. And be it further enacted, That all and every such Letters and Packets shall be delivered to the Postmaster General or his Deputy or Deputies in the General Post Office in Dublin at or between such Hours in the Day and under such Regulations in every respect as the Postmaster General for the Time being shall in his Discretion from Time to Time appoint ; and such Letters and Packets shall also be delivered by the Deputy or Deputies of the Postmaster General in the Country under such Regulations and Restrictions as the Postmaster General for the Time being shall from Time to Time think fit to appoint.

XXXV. And be it further enacted, That it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies, Servants and Agents, to retain any such Letters or Packets for any Space of Time not exceeding Twenty-four Hours after such Letters or Packets would otherwise in due and regular Course have been forwarded or delivered, and to open, examine, and search the same ; and in case upon Examination thereof it shall be discovered to contain any Cash, Bank Note, Bill of Exchange, Promissory Note, Draft, or Order for the Payment of Money, or other valuable Security, or any Writing, Communication, Matter, or Thing whatever, other than on the Business of the Charitable Society or Institution by or from which the same shall have been forwarded, or if any such Letter or Packet shall be found to exceed the Weight of an Ounce, then and in any such Case every such Letter or Packet shall be charged and chargeable with Double the Duty of Postage to which the same would be liable under any Act or Acts now or hereafter to be in force in Ireland ; and if the Amount be not paid by the Person or Persons to whom any such Letter shall be directed, or if such Person or Persons cannot be found, then the Secretary of the Society or Institution by or from which the same shall have been forwarded shall be liable to and chargeable with the Payment thereof ; and it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General or his Deputy or Deputies to retain any such Letter or Packet until such Double Duty of Postage shall be paid or recovered.

XXXVI. And whereas it frequently happens that Bags or Mails sent and conveyed by the Post, which may have been stolen or accidentally lost, and afterwards found or picked up, are wilfully detained by the Persons finding the same, in the Expectation of Gain or Reward, to the great Inconvenience of divers of His Majesty’s Subjects, and the Prejudice of Commerce ; to remedy therefore the said Evil be it further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act, if any Person or Persons in Ireland shall wilfully secrete, keep, or detain, or, being required to deliver up by any Deputy, Clerk, Agent, Letter Carrier, Postboy, Rider, Driver, or Guard of any Mail Coach, or any other Officer or Person whatsoever employed or to be employed in any Business relating to the Post Office, shall refuse or wilfully neglect to deliver up any Mail or Bag of Letters sent or conveyed, or made up in order to be sent or conveyed, by the Post, or any Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets sent or conveyed by the Post, or put for that Purpose into any Post Office or House or Place for the Receipt or Delivery of Letters or Packets sent or to be sent by the Post, and which Letter or Letters, Packet or Packets, Bag or Mail of Letters, shall have been found or picked up by the same or any other Person or Persons, or shall, by or through Accident or Mistake, have been left with or at the House of the same or any other Person or Persons, each and every Person and Persons so offending shall be deemed and taken to be guilty of a Misdemeanor, to be punished by Fine and Imprisonment.

XXXVII. And whereas it is expedient to prevent Obstructions opposite the General Post Offices in London and Dublin ; be it therefore enacted, That no Hackney Carriage of any Description whatever shall at any Time hereafter stand or ply for Hire in front or opposite the General Post Office in Saint Martin’s le Grand or the General Post Office in Sackville Street, Dublin, or either of them, or any Part thereof respectively ; and also that no Hawker, Newsvender, or other Person or Persons whatsoever shall at any Time hereafter unnecessarily stop or loiter on the Flagway or Pavement in front of the said Post Offices or either of them, or any Part thereof respectively, any Law to the contrary in anywise notwithstanding ; and in case the Driver or any Person or Persons having the Management of any Hackney Carriage shall permit the same to stand or ply for Hire in front of or opposite the General Post Office in Saint Martin’s le Grand, London, or the General Post Office in Sackville Street, Dublin, or either of them, or any Part thereof, or in case any Hawker, Newsvender, or other idle or disorderly Person shall unnecessarily or purposely stop or loiter on the Flagway or Pavement in front of the said General Post Offices or either of them, or any Part thereof, the Person or Persons so offending shall for every such Offence, on Conviction thereof in a summary Way before a Justice of the Peace, forfeit and pay to the Informer any Sum not exceeding Five Pounds, with Costs, and if not paid, either immediately after the Conviction or within such Period as the Justice shall at the Time of the Conviction appoint, it shall be lawful for the convicting Justice to commit the Offender to the Common Gaol or House of Correction, there to be imprisoned for any Time not exceeding Two Calendar Months, the Commitment to be determinable on Payment of the Amount and Costs.

XXXVIII. And for the more effectual Prosecution of the said last-mentioned Offence, be it enacted, That where any Person shall be charged, on the Oath of a credible Witness, before any Justice of the Peace, with any such Offence, the Justice may summon the Person charged to appear at a Time and Place to be named in such Summons, and if he or she shall not appear accordingly, then ( upon Proof of the due Service of the Summons upon such Person, by delivering the same to him or her personally, or by leaving the same at his or her usual Place of Abode, ) the Justice may either proceed to hear and determine the Case ex parte, or issue his Warrant for apprehending such Person, and bringing him or her before himself or some other Justice of the Peace, or the Justice before whom the Charge shall be made may, ( if he shall so think fit, ) without any previous Summons, issue such Warrant, and the Justice before whom the Person charged shall appear or be brought shall proceed to hear and determine the Case.

XXXIX. And be it enacted, That every Carriage with Two or more Wheels which shall stand or ply for Hire in front of or opposite the General Post Office in Saint Martin’s le Grand, London, or the General Post Office in Sackville Street, Dublin, or either of them, or any Part thereof, of whatever may be the Form or Construction of such Carriage, or the Number of Persons which the same shall be calculated to convey, or the Number of Horses by which the same shall be drawn, shall be deemed and taken to be a Hackney Carriage within the Meaning of this Act ; and in all Proceedings at Law or otherwise, and upon all Occasions whatsoever, it shall be sufficient to describe any such Carriage as aforesaid by the Term Hackney Carriage, without further or otherwise describing the same.

XL. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be altered, varied, or repealed by any Act or Acts to be passed in the present Session of Parliament.

The SCHEDULE to which this Act refers.

All within Ireland.
  • His Majesty’s Lieutenant General or other Chief Governor or Governors of Ireland.
  • His or their Chief Secretary.
  • His or their Secretary for the Provinces of Ulster and Munster in Ireland.
  • The Under Secretary for the Law Department of the Chief Secretary’s Office.
  • The Under Secretary and First Clerk for the Military Department of the Chief Secretary’s Office.
  • The First Clerk in the Office in Ireland of the said Secretary for the Provinces of Ulster and Munster.
  • The Lord High Treasurer or Commissioners of the Treasury.
  • The Lord High Chancellor.
  • The Chancellor of the Exchequer.
  • The Vice Treasurer.
  • The Secretary to the Treasury.
  • The Secretary to the Postmaster General.
  • The Adjutant General.
  • The Quartermaster General.
  • The Chief Commissioner of the Barrack Board.
  • The Assistant Under Secretary for the Law Department of the Chief Secretary’s Office.
  • The First Clerk of the Civil Department of the Secretary’s Office.
  • The Treasurer or Receiver General of the Post Office.
  • The Comptroller of the Sorting Office in the General Post Office.
  • The Surveyors of the Post Office.
  • The Registrar of Kilmainham Hospital.
  • The Officers for taking the Population Returns.
  • The Commissioners for the Assistance of Trade and Manufactures.
  • The Secretary of such Commissioners.
  • The Commissioners for the Issue of Exchequer Bills and Money out of the Consolidated Fund for the
  • Encouragement of Public Works and Fisheries, and the Persons appointed by them to sign Letters on the Outside.
  • The Secretary of such last-mentioned Commissioners.
  • The Special Commissioners for receiving Applications for Relief in case of extreme Necessity, and their Secretary.
  • The Commissioners for the Extension and Promotion of Public Works, and the Person appointed by them to sign Letters on the Outside.
  • The Secretary of such last-mentioned Commissioners.
  • The Commissioners for auditing Public Accounts.
  • Divisional Justices.
  • Charitable Institutions or Societies.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 4 & 5 William IV, Cap. 44 - August 13, 1834

An Act to regulate the Conveyance of printed Newspapers by Post between the United Kingdom, the British Colonies, and Foreign Parts.
[13th August 1834 ]

WHEREAS by an Act passed in the Fourth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act for preventing Frauds and Abuses in relation to the sending and receiving of Letters and Packets free from the Duty of Postage, reciting that forasmuch as it had been usual for the Clerks in the Offices of His Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, and also for certain Officers in the Office of His Majesty’s Postmaster General, to frank printed Votes and Proceedings in Parliament, and printed Newspapers to be sent by the Post, it was therefore enacted, that it should and might be lawful for such Clerks and Officers as aforesaid, being thereunto licensed by His Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State or His Majesty’s Postmaster General respectively, to continue to frank such printed Votes and Proceedings in Parliament and printed Newspapers in such Manner as they had theretofore been accustomed to frank the same : And whereas by an Act passed in the Forty-second Year of the Reign of His said late Majesty King George the Third, intituled An Act to authorize the sending and receiving of Letters and Packets, Votes, Proceedings in Parliament, and printed Newspapers by the Post free from the Duty of Postage, by the Members of the Two Houses of Parliament of the United Kingdom, and by certain Public Officers therein named, and for reducing the Postage on such Votes, Proceedings, and Newspapers when sent by any other Persons, it was amongst other Things enacted that the several Persons who by virtue of any Act or Acts passed in the Parliament of Great Britain or in the Parliament of Ireland, and then in force, were authorized in respect of their Offices to send Votes, Proceedings in Parliament, and printed Newspapers free from the Duty of Postage, should and might send the same within the United Kingdom in such and the like Manner as they had theretofore been accustomed to do : And whereas it is expedient that the Privilege of franking printed Votes and Proceedings in Parliament and printed Newspapers hitherto enjoyed by the Clerks in the Offices of His Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, and certain Officers in the Office of His Majesty’s Postmaster General, under or by virtue of the said hereinbefore in part recited Acts or otherwise, should be repealed and annulled, and that other Regulations should be made for the Conveyance of printed Newspapers by the Post : May it therefore please Your Majesty that it may be enacted ; and be it enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That from and after the First Day of October One thousand eight hundred and thirty-four so much and such Parts of the said in part recited Acts passed in the Fourth and Forty-second Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Third, and of any other Acts as authorize and empower any Clerks in the Offices of His Majesty’s Principal Secretaries of State, and any Officers in the Office of His Majesty’s Postmaster General, to send or receive printed Votes and Proceedings in Parliament and printed Newspapers by the Post free of the Duty of Postage, shall be and the same is and are hereby repealed ; and the said Privilege of franking as heretofore enjoyed by the said Officers and Clerks shall be and the same is hereby wholly annulled.

II. And whereas by an Act passed in the Sixth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth, intituled An Act to regulate the Conveyance of printed Votes and Proceedings in Parliament and printed Newspapers by Packet Boats between Great Britain and Ireland and the British Colonies, and also in the United Kingdom, printed Newspapers were authorized to be sent by Packet Boats from Great Britain and Ireland to any of His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas at a Rate of One Penny Halfpenny each, and Newspapers printed within His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas were authorized to be sent by Packet Boats to Great Britain and Ireland at a Rate of Three-pence each : And whereas it is expedient to authorize the Conveyance of printed Newspapers by Packet Boats between the United Kingdom and His Majesty’s Colonies free of Postage ; be it therefore further enacted, That from and after the First Day of October One thousand eight hundred and thirty-four so much of the said in part recited Act passed in the Sixth Year of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth as relates to the Postage and Conveyance of printed Newspapers by Packet Boats to and from His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas shall be and the same is hereby repealed.

III. And be it further enacted, That from and after the said First Day of October One thousand eight hundred and thirty-four it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and his Deputy and Deputies in Great Britain and Ireland, to receive at any General Post Office printed Newspapers liable to the Stamp Duty, and duly stamped for Conveyance by Packet Boat from the United Kingdom to any of His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas, and to forward and convey the same accordingly free of Postage ; and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies in His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas to receive Newspapers printed and published within such Colonies or Possessions for Conveyance by Packet Boats to Great Britain or Ireland, and to deliver the same by the General Post within the United Kingdom free of the Duty of Postage.

IV. And be it further enacted, That from and after the said Day of October One thousand eight hundred and thirty-four it and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and his Deputy and Deputies in Great Britain and Ireland, to receive at any General Post Office printed Newspapers liable to the Stamp Duty, and duly stamped for Conveyance by Packet Boats from Great Britain and Ireland to any Port out of the United Kingdom, other than His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions, and to forward the same accordingly free of the Duty of Postage, and that Newspapers printed in any Kingdom or State beyond the Seas, other than His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions, and brought into the United Kingdom by Packet Boats, shall and may ( if printed in the Language of the Foreign Kingdom or State from which the same shall be forwarded, but not otherwise, ) be delivered by the General Post within the United Kingdom free of the Duty of Postage : Provided always, that before any Newspapers to or from any Foreign Port shall be permitted to be conveyed or delivered free of Postage, under the Provisions of this Clause, satisfactory Proof shall have been laid before the Postmaster General for the Time being that printed Newspapers sent from Great Britain or Ireland addressed to any Person or Place in any Foreign Kingdom or State, are allowed to pass by the Post within any such Foreign Kingdom or State free of Postage, and also that Newspapers addressed to any Person or Place in Great Britain or Ireland from any such Foreign Kingdom or State are allowed to pass by the Post within such Foreign Kingdom or State free of Postage ; and it is hereby further declared, that as to every Newspaper put into any General Post Office within Great Britain or Ireland for Conveyance by Packet Boat, addressed to any Person or Place in any Foreign Kingdom or State in which printed Newspapers from Great Britain or Ireland shall not be allowed to pass by the Post free of Postage, it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being ( until such satisfactory Proof shall be laid before him as aforesaid ), and his Deputy and Deputies, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take for the Conveyance of every such printed Newspaper to any Foreign Port the Sum of Two-pence, to be paid when the same shall be put into the Post Office ; and as to every Newspaper addressed to Great Britain or Ireland, and brought into the United Kingdom from any Foreign Kingdom or State in which such printed Newspapers shall not be allowed to pass by the Post free of Postage, it is hereby declared that it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being ( until such satisfactory Proof shall be laid before him as aforesaid ), and his Deputy and Deputies, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take for the Conveyance of every such Newspaper by the General Post the Sum of Two-pence on Delivery thereof by such Post to the Person to whom the same shall be addressed, over and above and in addition to any Postage charged thereon by any Foreign Post Office, provided every such Paper be printed and published in the Language of the Kingdom or State from which the same shall be forwarded.

V. And whereas Circumstances may arise which may render it expedient again to impose and demand the said respective Rates of Two-pence by the said lastly herein-before-mentioned Clause granted, after the same shall have ceased to be demanded by reason of such satisfactory Proof having been laid before the Postmaster General for the Time being as aforesaid ; now be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, by and with the Consent of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three or more of them, at any Time after such satisfactory Proof shall have been laid before His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being as aforesaid, again to impose, demand, and receive the said respective Rates of Two-pence for the Conveyance of any such printed Newspaper to any Foreign Port, and on the Delivery of any such printed Newspaper from any Foreign Kingdom or State, whenever it shall be deemed expedient so to do.

VI. And be it further enacted, That no Newspaper shall be sent by the Post under the Provisions of this present Act, unless every such Paper be sent without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides, and that there be no Words or Communication printed on such Paper after the same shall have been published, nor any Writing or Marks upon such printed Paper or the Cover thereof, other than the Name and Address of the Person to whom it is sent, and so that there be no Paper or Thing enclosed or concealed in or with such printed Paper or the Cover thereof, nor any printed Words or Communication on the Cover thereof.

VII. And be it further enacted, That every printed Newspaper to be sent out of the United Kingdom under the Provisions of this Act shall in all Cases be put into a Post Office or Receiving Office in Great Britain or Ireland within Seven Days next after the Day on which the same shall be published, the Day of Publication to be ascertained by the Date of such Paper ; and in case any such Paper shall be put into any Post Office at any Time after the Expiration of such Seven Days, it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General or his Deputy or Deputies, at his or their Discretion, either to detain any such Paper or to forward the same by the Post, charged with the full Duty of Letter Postage according to the Rates now established by Law.

VIII. And be it further enacted, That in case any Person to whom any printed Newspaper brought into the United Kingdom under the Provisions of this Act shall be directed shall have removed from or quitted the Place to which such Newspaper shall be addressed prior to the Delivery thereof at such Place, any such Newspaper, on arriving or Delivery at the Place of its Address, shall and may ( provided the same shall not have been opened or used, but not otherwise ) be re-directed, and forwarded by the Post to such Person at any other Place within the United Kingdom, free of any Charge for such extra Conveyance ; but if any such Newspaper shall have been opened or used, the same shall, on re-direction, be charged and chargeable with the Rate of a Single Letter, from the Place at which such Newspaper shall be re-directed or re-posted to the Place at which it shall be ultimately delivered.

IX. And whereas under and by virtue of the said in part recited Acts of the Fourth and Forty-second Years of the Reign of King George the Third, and the Privilege thereby conferred, certain unstamped Publications have from Time immemorial been sent by the General Post from London to Places within the United Kingdom, at certain small annual Charges, and much Injury and Inconvenience may arise to the Public by the Repeal of such Privilege in regard to the said Publications ; be it therefore enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and he is hereby authorized and empowered, with the Consent and Approbation of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three or more of them, from Time to Time to contract, compound, and agree with the Editor, Proprietor, or Publisher of any such unstamped Publication, as hath hitherto been sent by the Post under the Privilege aforesaid, for forwarding the same by the General Post within the United Kingdom, on Payment to His Majesty’s Post Office Revenue yearly of such a Sum of Money for each such Publication as may from Time to Time be agreed on, so as every such Publication be sent without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides, and there be no Words or Communication printed on any such Publication after the same shall have been published, nor any Writing or Marks upon such Publication or the Cover thereof, other than the Name and Address of the Person to whom it is sent, and so that there be no Paper or Thing enclosed or concealed in or with any such Publication or the Cover thereof, nor any printed Words or Communication on the Cover thereof ; and the forwarding of such Publications by the Post shall be subject to all such other Regulations as the Postmaster General may deem expedient.

X. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for Majesty’s Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies, or of the Officers employed under him or them respectively, to and search any printed Paper or Packet which under the of this present Act shall be sent by the Post without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides as aforesaid, in order to discover whether any Words or Communication have or has been printed on such Paper after the same was published, or whether there is any Writing or Mark upon such printed Paper or the Cover thereof other than the Name and Address of the Person to whom it is sent, or whether there is any Paper or Thing enclosed or concealed in or with such printed Paper or the Cover thereof, or whether there are any printed Words or Communication on the Cover thereof, or whether the Papers brought into the United Kingdom from any Foreign Kingdom or State shall be printed and published in Language of the Kingdom or State from which they shall been forwarded ; and also, in order to discover whether the Newspapers printed and posted in the United Kingdom shall be duly stamped, and in case any Words or Communication shall be found to have been printed on any such Paper after the same was published, or any Writing or Mark shall be found on any such printed Paper or the Cover thereof other than the Name and Address the Person to whom it is sent, or any other Paper or Thing shall be found to be enclosed or concealed in or with such printed Paper or the Cover thereof as aforesaid, or any printed Words or Communication shall be found upon the Cover thereof, or in case any Newspaper brought into the United Kingdom from any Foreign Kingdom or State shall not be printed and published in the Language of the Kingdom or State from which the same shall have been forwarded, the whole of every such Packet addressed and delivered to any Person within the United Kingdom shall be charged with Treble the Duty of Letter Postage according to the Rates now established by Law ; and as to every such Paper or Packet going out of the United Kingdom it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General or his Deputy or Deputies, at his or their Discretion, either to detain any such Paper or Packet or to forward the same by the Post, charged with the Duty of Letter Postage ; and in case any Newspaper printed and posted in the United Kingdom and sent by the Post under the Provisions of this Act shall appear not to have been duly stamped, the same shall be stopped and sent to the Commissioners of Stamps either at London or Dublin, as the Case may be.

XI. And be it further enacted, That all printed Papers to be conveyed by the Post under the Provisions of this Act shall be delivered to the Postmaster General, or his Deputy or Deputies, at such Hours in the Day and under all such Regulations as Postmaster General for the Time being shall in his Discretion Time to Time appoint.

XII. And be it further enacted, That nothing herein shall be construed to oblige any Person or Persons to send any printed Newspapers to or from Places beyond the Seas through His Majesty’s Post Office, but that it shall and may be lawful for all Persons to send such printed Newspapers to and from Places beyond the Seas in any Manner they may find practicable or convenient.

XIII. And be it further enacted, That in all Cases in which any Dispute, Controversy, or Question shall arise whether any printed Paper sent or offered to be sent by the Post, under the Provisions of this Act or any other Act relating or referring to the Post Office, is to be considered and deemed a Newspaper within the Intent and Meaning of this Act or any other Act relating or referring to the Post Office, or whether any such printed Paper is entitled to the Exemptions and Privileges of a Newspaper so far as to authorize the Transmission of the same by the Post free of Postage, the Question shall be referred to the Judgment and Determination of the Postmaster General for the Time being, whose Decision, with the Concurrence of any Three or more of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, shall be final and conclusive on all Persons whomsoever.

XIV. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates and Duties herein-before granted shall be paid from Time to Time into the Hands of the Receiver General for the Time being in England and Ireland of the Revenue of the Post Office, who shall pay the same ( the necessary Charges for collecting, paying, and accounting for the same being first deducted ) into the Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer, on such Days and Times and in such Manner as the Rates and Duties of Postage by any Act or Acts in force at or immediately before the passing of this Act are directed to be paid ; and the said Duties so to be paid into the said Receipt as aforesaid shall be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

XV. And be it further enacted, That no Action or Suit shall be commenced against any Person or Persons for any thing done in pursuance of this Act, unless within Three Calendar Months after the Right of Action shall have accrued, and the Defendant or Defendants in such Action or Suit shall and may plead the General Issue, and give this Act and the special Matter in Evidence, and that the same was done in pursuance of and by the Authority of this Act ; and if it shall appear so to be done, or the Action or Suit shall be commenced after the Time before limited for bringing the same, then the Jury shall find for the Defendant or Defendants ; or if the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs shall be nonsuited, or discontinue his, her, or their Action or Suit after the Defendant or Defendants shall have appeared, or if, upon Demurrer, Judgment shall be given against the Plaintiff or Plaintiffs, the Defendant or Defendants shall and may recover Treble Costs, and have the like Remedy for the same as any Defendant or Defendants hath or have in any other Cases by Law.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be altered, varied, or repealed by any Act or Acts to be passed in this present Session of Parliament.
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Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by rossi »

Act, 5 & 6 William IV, Cap. 25 - August 21, 1835

An Act to extend the Accommodation by the Post to and from Foreign Parts and for other Purposes relating to the Post Office.
[ 21st August 1835 ]

WHEREAS by virtue of divers Acts of Parliament His Majesty’s Postmaster General is authorized, to and the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand. have, receive, and take certain Rates of Postage for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets by the Post between the United Kingdom and Foreign Parts : And whereas, in addition to said Rates, such Letters and Packets are subject to Rates Postage for their Conveyance within Foreign Kingdoms States : And whereas it is expedient, for the Purpose of facilitating the Intercourse with Foreign Countries, that the Postage, as well British as Foreign, on such Letters and Packets, should be payable in whole or in part either by the Sender or Receiver :

Be it therefore enacted by the King’s most Excellent Majesty, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, in this present Parliament assembled, and by the Authority of the same, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and his Deputies, and he and they are hereby authorized and empowered, to receive and take, upon any Letters or Packets addressed to any Foreign Kingdom or State, from the Person sending the same, the Postage both British and Foreign in one entire Sum, for the Conveyance of such Letters and Packets by the Post to the Places to which the same shall be respectively addressed, and also to demand, receive, and take, upon Letters and Packets coming from Foreign Parts addressed to any Place within His Majesty’s Dominions, in addition to the British Rates of Postage to which the same may be liable, the Rates of Foreign Postage which may be due or payable in respect thereof, and to account for or pay over to any Foreign Kingdom or State, Kingdoms or States, entitled to receive the same, the Amount of such Foreign Postage.

II. And be it further enacted, That from and after the Postmaster General for the Time being shall have made and entered into any Treaty or Agreement with the Post Office of any Foreign Kingdom or State for collecting and accounting for the British Postage on Letters and Packets sent by the Post from the United Kingdom to any such Foreign Kingdom or State, or to any other Foreign Kingdom or State, and so long as any such Treaty or Agreement shall continue in force, it shall be optional with every Person sending any Letter or Packet by the Post from the United Kingdom to any Foreign Kingdom or State which shall be included in any such Treaty or Agreement, or to which the same shall extend, to pay the British and Foreign Postage thereof in one entire Sum as aforesaid, or to send the same without Payment of any Part of such entire Sum, to the Intent that the whole thereof may be paid by the Person or Persons to whom the same shall be addressed, or otherwise to pay the British Postage only ( as heretofore ) on any such Letter or Packet.

III. And be it further enacted, That the Rates of Foreign Postage marked on any Letters or Packets brought into Great Britain or Ireland shall, in all Courts of Justice and other Places, be deemed, received, and taken as conclusive Evidence of the Amount of Foreign Postage payable in respect of any such Letter or Packet, in addition to the Rates of British Postage payable for the Conveyance of the same : and such Foreign Postage shall be recoverable in Great Britain and Ireland, and other His Majesty’s Dominions, as Postage due and payable to His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors.

IV. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein or in any other Act or Acts contained shall be construed to entitle any Person or Persons to send or receive by the Post, free from the Duties of Postage, any Letters or Packets which are or may be liable to any Foreign Rates of Postage ( the Public Dispatches to and from His Majesty’s Secretaries of State, and the British Embassies and Legations at Foreign Courts, being bona fide on the Public Service, only excepted ).

V. And whereas it be considered expedient that certain Letters and Packets sent by the Post should be registered ; be it therefore further enacted, That in case the Postmaster General for the Time being shall at any Time hereafter in his Discretion deem it expedient that any Letters or Packets sent or to be sent by the Post should be registered by the Post Office, it shall be lawful for him, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to demand, have, receive, and take, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, for and in respect of each and every Letter or Packet which shall be so registered, such Rate or Rates of Postage, in addition to any Rates payable under or by virtue of this Act or any other Act or Acts of Parliament relating to the Post Office, as the Postmaster General for the Time being, with the Consent of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three or more of them, signified by Writing under their Hands, or under the Hand of any one of the Secretaries or Assistant Secretaries to the Treasury for the Time being, shall from Time to Time direct or appoint, ( but such Registration shall not render the Postmaster General or the Post Office Revenue in any Manner liable for the Loss of any such Letters or Packets, or the Contents thereof, ) all which Letters and Packets shall be delivered to the Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies, and also be delivered by them at or between such Hours in the Day, and under all such Regulations in every respect as the Postmaster General for the Time being shall in his Discretion from Time to Time appoint, with full Power for him to require such Registration Rate or Rates to be paid on any such Letter or Packet being put into the Post Office.

VI. And whereas Letters and Packets sent by the Post between Dovor and Calais are now chargeable with the same Rates of Postages as Letters sent between London and Calais ; and it is expedient to reduce the same ; be it therefore further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Port and Conveyance of all Letters and Packets which shall be carried or conveyed by Packet Boats from or to the Port of Dovor, or any other Port in Great Britain, to or from the Port of Calais, or any other Port in France, and not sent to or from London ( over and above any Inland Rates payable on such Letters and Packets ), a Packet Postage according to the Rates and Sums herein-after mentioned ; ( that is to say, ) for the Port and Conveyance of every Single Letter a Rate of Sixpence ; for every Double Letter, One Shilling ; for every Treble Letter, One Shilling and Sixpence ; and for every Ounce Weight, Two Shillings, and so in proportion for any greater Weight, reckoning every Quarter of an Ounce equal to a Single Letter : Provided always, that nothing herein contained shall extend or be deemed or construed to extend to alter or repeal an Act passed in the Fourth and Fifth Years of the Reign of King William the Fourth, intituled An Act to regulate the Conveyance of printed Newspapers by Post between the United Kingdom, the British Colonies, and Foreign Parts.

VII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General for the Time being, at any Time hereafter, to lower or reduce all or any of the British Rates of Postage which are or shall be payable on Letters and Packets sent by the Post to and from Foreign Parts, to such respective Amounts or Extent as the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three or more of them, signified by Writing under their Hands, or under the Hand of any one of the Secretaries or Assistant Secretaries to the Treasury for the Time being, shall from Time to Time direct or appoint, and thenceforth it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General and his Deputies to demand, receive, and take such reduced Rates accordingly.

VIII. And whereas by an Act passed in the Thirty-ninth Year of the Reign of King George the Third, intituled An Act for the more secure Conveyance of Ship Letters, and for granting to His Majesty certain Rates of Postage thereon, the Postmaster General is authorized to collect and receive Letters and Packets of Letters directed to Places within His Majesty’s Dominions, also to any the Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, and to forward the same by any Ships or Vessels that he in his Discretion shall think fit, although not Packet Boats, and to demand and receive, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, for every Letter and Packet which shall be delivered to him and his Deputies for Conveyance in the Manner therein-before specified, a Sum not less than One Half Part of the Rates and Duties payable by Law for such respective Letters and Packets if the same were conveyed by Packet Boats, and in Cases where no Rate of Postage is already established, then to demand and receive for such Letters and Packets Rates, as near as the same can be ascertained, equal to One Half of what is paid for Letters sent beyond the Seas : And whereas it is expedient that the Rates of Postage imposed by the said Act should be reduced ; be it therefore enacted, That the Rates of Postage granted by the said last-recited Act for the Conveyance of Letters and Packets through the Post, by Ships or Vessels not being Packet Boats, shall be and the same are hereby repealed, and that in lieu thereof it shall and may be lawful to and for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, in his and their Discretion, to collect and receive Letters and Packets of Letters, directed to Places within His Majesty’s Dominions, also to any the Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, and to forward the same by any Ships or Vessels that he in his Discretion shall think fit, although not Packet Boats or Ships or Vessels by which the Postmaster General shall have contracted for the Conveyance of Mails of Letters pursuant to an Act passed in the Second Year of the Reign of King William the Fourth, intituled An Act to enable His Majesty’s Postmaster General to extend the Accommodation by Post, and to regulate the Privilege of franking, in Ireland ; and for other Purposes relating to the Post Office ; and that it shall be lawful for His said Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for every Letter and Packet which shall be delivered to him or his Deputies for Conveyance in manner lastly herein-before mentioned, ( except Letters and Packets sent by private Ships from Great Britain to Ireland, or from Ireland to Great Britain, or between any Ports or Places in Great Britain or Ireland, ) the Rates of Postage herein-after mentioned : ( that is to say, ) if such Letter or Packet be posted at the Port from which such Ship or Vessel shall sail, or at which such Ship or Vessel may touch, a Rate of Eight-pence for every Single Letter, and so in proportion for Packets ; and if such Letter or Packet shall be posted at any other Part of the United Kingdom than the Port from which such Ship or Vessel shall sail, or at which such Ship or Vessel may touch, a Rate of One Shilling for every Single Letter, and so in proportion for Packets ; and for every Letter or Packet which shall be delivered to the Postmaster General or his Deputies for Conveyance in manner lastly herein-before mentioned, from Great Britain to Ireland, and from Ireland to Great Britain, or from any Port or Place in Great Britain or Ireland to any other Port or Place within the same, or either of them, a Rate of Eight-pence on every Single Letter, and so in proportion as aforesaid for Packets, over and above and in addition to any Rates which may arise on the Inland Conveyance of such last-mentioned Letters or Packets within Great Britain and Ireland : Provided always, that nothing herein contained shall extend, or be deemed or construed to extend, to alter or repeal any of the Rates which the Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies are authorized to demand, have, receive, and take for Letters and Packets delivered to him or them for Conveyance to Ceylon, the Mauritius, the East Indies, or the Cape of Good Hope, by an Act passed in the Fifty-ninth Year of the Reign of King George the Third, intituled An Act to repeal so much of an Act passed in the Fifty-fifth Year of the Reign of His present Majesty as relates to the Postage and Conveyance of Letters to and from the Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, the Mauritius, and the East Indies ; and to make other Regulations respecting the Postage of such Letters and Packets, and other Letters and Packets sent by the Post ; but the Provisions of this Clause shall nevertheless be deemed and construed to extend to and include Letters and Packets directed to China.

IX. And for the Encouragement of the Masters of such Ships or Vessels, be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful to and for the said Postmaster General to allow all such Masters the Sum of Two-pence a Letter or Packet upon all such Letters or Packets as they shall respectively have or take on board such Ship or Vessel, provided such Letters and Packets shall have been delivered to them from the Post Office.

X. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall extend or be construed to extend to prevent any Person or Persons, at his or their Discretion, from sending any Letters or Packets by any Ship or Vessel ( not being a Packet Boat or Ship or Vessel by which the Postmaster General shall have contracted for the Conveyance of Mails of Letters pursuant to the said Act passed in the Second Year of the Reign of King William the Fourth ), from any Port to any Place out of Great Britain or Ireland, otherwise than through the Post Office : Provided always, that nothing herein contained shall extend in anywise to authorize or empower any Person or Persons to make any Collection of Letters contrary to the Laws now in force relating to the Post Office.

XI. And whereas it is expedient that the Rates on Letters brought into that Part of the United Kingdom called Ireland by Ships other than Packet Boats should be assimilated to the Rates on Ship Letters brought into Great Britain ; be it therefore further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act it shall and may be lawful to and for the Postmaster General and his Deputies to demand, have, receive, and take for every Letter which shall be brought into Ireland by Ships and Vessels other than Packet Boats from Places within His Majesty’s Dominions and any the Kingdoms and Countries beyond the Seas, other than and except from the Cape of Good Hope, the Mauritius, Ceylon and the East Indies, ( in lieu of the Rates of Sea Postage now payable thereon, ) the same Rates of Sea Postage ( over and above any Inland Rates ) as under or by virtue of an Act passed in the Fifty-fifth Year of the Reign of King George the Third, intituled An Act for granting certain Rates on the Postage of Letters to and from Great Britain, the Cape of Good Hope, the Mauritius, and the East Indies, and for making certain Regulations respecting the Postage of Ship Letters, and of Letters in Great Britain, would be payable on such Letters and Packets if brought by such Ships or Vessels into Great Britain.

XII. And be it further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act every Letter or Packet which shall be brought into Great Britain or Ireland by Ships or Vessels other than Packet Boats, from any Port or Place in China, shall be liable to and chargeable with the same Rates of Sea Postage ( over and above any Inland Rates ) as would be payable under or by virtue of the said Act passed in the Fifty-fifth Year of the Reign of King George the Third if such Letters or Packets were brought into Great Britain by Ships or Vessels other than Packet Boats from any other Foreign Kingdom ; and so much of the said last-mentioned Act as enacts that nothing therein contained shall extend to any Letters or Packets from China shall be and the same is hereby repealed.

XIII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General and his Deputies to demand, have, receive, and take for every Letter or Packet which shall be brought into Ireland by any Ship or Vessel arriving from the Cape of Good Hope, the Mauritius, Ceylon, or the East Indies, the like Rates of Sea Postage ( over and above any Inland Rates ) as under or by virtue of the said Act passed in the Fifty-ninth Year of the Reign of King George the Third would be payable on such Letters and Packets if brought by such Ships or Vessels into Great Britain, and to make to the Commander or Master of every such Ship or Vessel the like Allowances in respect of such Letters and Packets as would by Law be allowable in case such Letters and Packets had been brought into Great Britain.

XIV. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies by him thereunto authorized, to collect and receive in Ireland Letters and Packets directed to the Cape of Good Hope, the Mauritius, Ceylon, or the East Indies, and to forward the same by any Ships or Vessels that he or they in his or their Discretion shall think fit ; and to demand, have, receive and take for every such last-mentioned Letter or Packet the like Rates of Sea Postage ( over and above any Inland Rates ) as under or by virtue of the said Act passed in the Fifty-ninth Year of the Reign of King George the Third would be payable on such Letters and Packets if the same were sent from Great Britain ; and the Masters and Commanders of all Ships and Vessels sailing from Ireland bound to the Cape of Good Hope, the Mauritius, Ceylon, or the East Indies are hereby required to receive on board their respective Ships any Bag or Bags of Letters and Packets which shall be tendered to them for Conveyance as aforesaid by the Postmaster General or any Officer of the Post Office, without receiving or being entitled to receive any Remuneration for such Conveyance.

XV. And whereas by an Act passed in the Seventh and Eighth Years of the Reign of His late Majesty King George the Fourth, intituled An Act to amend the Laws relating to the Duties of Postage in Great Britain and Ireland, the Postmaster General is authorized to demand and receive for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, for every Newspaper printed within His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas, and brought into Great Britain and Ireland by any Ship other than a Packet, and delivered at any Post Office, the Sum of Three-pence : And whereas Newspapers printed within the United Kingdom, and sent from thence by Ships and Vessels ( other than Packet Boats ) to His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas ( other than and except the East Indies ), are now liable to the same Rates and Duties of Postage as Letters : And whereas it is expedient that the Rates of Postage on all such Newspapers should be reduced ; be it therefore further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act so much of the said Act passed in the Seventh and Eighth Years of the Reign of King George the Fourth as subjects Newspapers printed within His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas, and brought into Great Britain and Ireland by Ships other than Packets, to a Rate of Three-pence each, shall be and the same is hereby repealed.

XVI. And be it further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand and receive for the Conveyance of every Newspaper printed within His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond Seas, and brought into the United Kingdom by any Ship or Vessel other than a Packet Boat, and delivered by the Commander of any such Ship or Vessel at any Post Office, the Sum of One Penny on Delivery thereof within the United Kingdom to the Person or Persons to whom the same shall be addressed.

XVII. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, and his Deputy and Deputies in Great Britain and Ireland, to receive at any Post Office printed Newspapers liable to the Stamp Duty, and duly stumped, directed to Places within any of His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions beyond the Seas, and to forward the same by any Ships or Vessels that he in his Discretion may think fit ( not being Packet Boats ), and to demand, have, receive, and take for every Newspaper which shall be delivered to him or his Deputies for Conveyance in manner last aforesaid the Sum of One Penny.

XVIII. And whereas Foreign Newspapers brought into the United Kingdom by Ships or Vessels other than Packet Boats, and Newspapers printed within the United Kingdom, and sent from thence by Ships and Vessels other than Packet Boats to Foreign Parts, are now liable, on Conveyance by the Post to the same Rates and Duties of Postage as Letters ; and it is expedient that the Rates on all such Newspapers should be reduced ; be it therefore further enacted, That from and after the passing of this Act it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies in Great Britain and Ireland, to receive at any Post Office printed Newspapers liable to the Stamp Duty and duly stamped, directed to any Kingdom or Country beyond the Seas ( other than His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions ), and to forward the same to any Foreign Port by any Ships or Vessels that he in his Discretion may think fit ( not being Packet Boats ), and to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, for every Newspaper which shall be delivered to him or his Deputies for Conveyance in manner last aforesaid the Sum of One Penny ; and for every Newspaper printed in any Kingdom or State beyond the Seas ( other than His Majesty’s Colonies and Possessions ), and brought into the United Kingdom by any Ship or Vessel ( other than a Packet Boat ), and delivered by the Commander of any such Ship or Vessel at any Post Office, ( if printed in the Language of the Foreign Kingdom or State from which the same shall be forwarded, but not otherwise, ) it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand and receive the Sum of One Penny on Delivery thereof within the United Kingdom to the Person or Persons to whom the same shall be addressed : Provided always, that before any Newspapers to or from any Foreign Kingdom or State shall be permitted to be conveyed or delivered under the Provisions of this Clause satisfactory Proof shall have been laid before the Postmaster General for the Time being, that printed Newspapers sent from Great Britain and Ireland, addressed to any Person or Place in any such Foreign Kingdom or State, are allowed to pass by the Post within any such Foreign Kingdom or State free of Postage, and also that Newspapers addressed to any Person or Place in Great Britain or Ireland from any such Foreign Kingdom or State are allowed to pass by the Post within such Foreign Kingdom or State free of Postage ; and it is hereby declared, that as to every Newspaper put into any Post Office within Great Britain or Ireland, for Conveyance by Ships or Vessels other than Packet Boats, addressed to any Person or Place in any Foreign Kingdom or State in which printed Newspapers from Great Britain or Ireland shall not be allowed to pass by the Post free of Postage, it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being ( until such satisfactory Proof shall be laid before him as aforesaid ), and his Deputy and Deputies, for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Conveyance of every such printed Newspaper to any Foreign Port, the Sum of Two-pence ; and as to every Newspaper addressed to Great Britain or Ireland, and brought into the United Kingdom by any Ship or Vessel other than a Packet Boat from any Foreign Kingdom or State in which such printed Newspapers shall not be allowed to pass by the Post free of Postage, it is hereby declared, that it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being ( until such satisfactory Proof shall be laid before him as aforesaid ), and his Deputy and Deputies, to and for the Use of His Majesty, His Heirs and Successors, to demand, have, receive, and take, for the Conveyance of every such Newspaper by the Post, the Sum of Two-pence on Delivery thereof to the Person to whom the same shall be addressed, over and above and in addition to any Postage charged thereon by any Foreign Post Office, provided every such Paper be printed and published in the Language of the Kingdom or State from which the same shall be forwarded.

XIX. And whereas Circumstances may arise which may render it expedient again to impose and demand the said respective Rates of Two-pence by the said last mentioned Clause granted, after the same shall have ceased to be demanded by reason of such satisfactory Proof having been laid before the Postmaster General for the Time being as aforesaid ; now be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being, by and with the Consent of the Lords Commissioners of His Majesty’s Treasury, or any Three or more of them, at any Time after such satisfactory Proof shall have been laid before His Majesty’s Postmaster General for the Time being as aforesaid, again to impose, demand, and receive the said respective Rates of Two-pence for the Conveyance of any such printed Newspaper to any Foreign Port, and on the Delivery of any such printed Newspaper from any Foreign Kingdom or State, whenever it shall be deemed expedient so to do.

XX. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General to allow and pay the Masters and Commanders of Ships and Vessels the Sum of One Penny on every printed Newspaper which shall be brought into the United Kingdom under the Provisions of this Act, and be delivered by them at the Post Office of the Post Town at which they shall touch or arrive, and the like Sum of One Penny on every printed Newspaper which shall be delivered by the Postmaster General or his Deputies to any such Masters or Commanders for Conveyance under the Provisions of this present Act.

XXI. Provided always, and be it further enacted, That nothing herein contained shall extend, or be deemed or construed to extend, to alter or repeal any of the Rates which the Postmaster General and his Deputy and Deputies are authorized to demand, have, receive, and take by the said Act passed in the Fifty-ninth Year of the Reign of King George the Third, for printed Newspapers delivered to him or them for Conveyance to the Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, the Mauritius, or the East Indies, which Act it is hereby declared shall be deemed and construed to extend to Newspapers posted in Ireland for Conveyance to any of the said last-mentioned Places ; but the Provisions of this Act shall nevertheless be deemed to extend to and include Newspapers brought into the United Kingdom from the Cape of Good Hope, Ceylon, the Mauritius, the East Indies, and China, and also Newspapers delivered to the Postmaster General or his Deputies directed to China.

XXII. And be it further enacted, That no Newspaper shall be sent by the Post under the Provisions of this present Act unless every such Paper be sent without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides, and that there be no Words or Communication printed on such Paper after the same shall have been published, nor any Writing or Marks upon such printed Paper or the Cover thereof, other than the Name and Address of the Person to whom it is sent, and so that there be no Paper or Thing enclosed or concealed in or with such printed Paper or the Cover thereof, nor any printed Words or Communication on the Cover thereof.

XXIII. And be it further enacted, That every printed Newspaper to be sent out of the United Kingdom under the Provisions of this Act shall in all Cases be put into a Post Office or Receiving Office in Great Britain or Ireland within Seven Days next after the Day on which the same shall be published, the Day of Publication to be ascertained by the Date of such Paper ; and in case any such Paper shall be put into any Post Office at any Time after the Expiration of such Seven Days, it shall and may be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General or his Deputy or Deputies, at his or their Discretion, either to detain any such Paper, or to forward the same by the Post charged with the full Duty of Letter Postage according to the Rates now established by Law.

XXIV. And be it further enacted, That it shall be lawful for His Majesty’s Postmaster General, and his Deputy and Deputies, or any of the Officers employed under him or them respectively, to examine and search any printed Newspaper which under the Provisions of this Act shall be sent by the Post without a Cover, or in a Cover open at the Sides as aforesaid, in order to discover whether any Words or Communication have or has been printed on such Paper after the same was published, or whether there is any Writing or Mark upon such printed Paper or the Cover thereof, other than the Name and Address of the Person to whom it is sent, or whether there is any Paper or Thing enclosed or concealed in or with such printed Newspaper or the Cover thereof, or whether there are any printed Words or Communication on the Cover thereof, or whether the Papers brought into the United Kingdom from any Foreign Kingdom or State shall be printed and published in the Language of the Kingdom or State from which they shall have been forwarded, and also in order to discover whether Newspapers printed and posted in the United Kingdom are duly stamped ; and in case any Words or Communication shall be found to have been printed on any such Paper after the same was published, or any Writing or Mark shall be found on any such printed Paper or the Cover thereof, other than the Name and Address of the Person to whom it is sent, or any other Paper or Thing shall be found to be enclosed or concealed in or with such printed Paper or the Cover thereof as aforesaid, or any printed Words or Communication shall be found upon the Cover thereof, or in case any Newspaper brought into the United Kingdom from any Foreign Kingdom or State shall not be printed and published in the Language of the Kingdom or State from which the same shall have been forwarded, the whole of every such Packet addressed and delivered to any Person within the United Kingdom shall be charged with Treble the Duty of Letter Postage, according to the Rates now established by Law ; and as to every such Paper or Packet going out of the United Kingdom, it shall be lawful for the Postmaster General or his Deputy or Deputies, at his or their Discretion, either to detain any such Paper or Packet, or to forward the same by the Post charged with the Duty of Letter Postage ; and in case any Newspaper printed and posted in the United Kingdom, and sent by the Post under the Provisions of this Act, shall appear not to have been duly stamped, the same shall be stopped, and sent to the Commissioners of Stamps either at London or Dublin as the Case may be.

XXV. And be it further enacted, That all printed Papers to be conveyed by the Post under the Provisions of this Act shall be delivered to the Postmaster General, or his Deputy or Deputies, at such Hours in the Day and under all such Regulations as the Postmaster General for the Time being shall in his Discretion from Time to Time appoint.

XXVI. And be it further enacted, That so much of an Act passed in the Ninth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, intituled An Act for establishing a General Post Office for all Her Majesty’s Dominions, and for settling a weekly Sum out of the Revenues thereof for the Service of the War and other Her Majesty’s Occasions, as enacts, that if the Packet or Mail shall be carried out of Great Britain into any Part or Place beyond the Seas, in any Ship or Vessel which is not a free Ship and navigated with such Seamen as by the Laws of this Land the same are required to be, the Postmaster General for the Time being shall in every such Case forfeit the Sum of One hundred Pounds Sterling, shall be and the same is hereby repealed.

XXVII. And be it further enacted, That the several Rates and Duties of British Postage herein-before granted shall be paid from Time to Time into the Hands of the Receiver General for the Time being of the Revenue of the Post Office, who shall pay the same ( the necessary Charges for collecting, paying, and accounting for the same being first deducted ) into the Receipt of His Majesty’s Exchequer, on such Days and Times and in such Manner as the present Rates and Duties are directed by Law to be paid ; and the said Duties so to be paid into the said Receipt as aforesaid shall be carried to and made Part of the Consolidated Fund of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland.

XXVIII. And be it further enacted, That so often as any Sum or Sums of Money, not exceeding Twenty Pounds, shall be due from any Person or Persons in Great Britain or Ireland, ( whether under this Act, or under any other Act or Acts relating to the Post Office, ) for the Postage of any Letter or Packet, Letters or Packets, to him, her, or them delivered by any Deputy, Agent, or Letter Carrier under His Majesty’s Postmaster General, or which shall be due from any Deputy, Agent, or Letter Carrier in Great Britain or Ireland for the Port of any Letters or Packets to him, her, or them intrusted for Delivery under the Authority of the said Postmaster General, or from any other Person or Persons employed or to be employed in receiving or collecting the Postage of Letters or Packets, or any of the Post Office Revenue, it shall be lawful for any Constable, Tithingman, or other Peace Officer of the County, Riding, Division, City, Town, or Place where such Person or Persons shall reside, first obtaining a Warrant for that Purpose under the Hand and Seal or Hands and Seals of any One or more of His Majesty’s Justices acting in and for such County, Riding, Division, City, Town, or Place, ( which Justice or Justices on Complaint made to him or them shall summon the Party complained of, and the Witnesses on either Side, and examine into the Matter of Fact, and shall grant such Warrant, on due Proof being made of the Sum or Sums due and owing from such Person or Persons as aforesaid by the voluntary Confession of the Party or by the Oath of One or more Witness or Witnesses, ) to distrain such Person or Persons by his, her, or their Goods and Chattels for the Amount of such Debt, and the Distress so to be taken to detain and keep for the Space of Five Days at the Costs and Charges of such Person or Persons ; and if he, she, or they shall not within the Time pay the Amount of such Debt, with the Costs and Charges of taking and keeping such Distress, then the Goods and Chattels so distrained shall be sold by such Constable, Tithingman, or other Peace Officer, who shall render the Overplus ( if any ) of the Money arising by the Sale thereof, after deducting and retaining the Amount of such Debt, and the Costs and Charges of taking, keeping, and selling such Distress, to the Person or Persons so to be distrained as aforesaid ; and for the Purpose of taking such Distress it shall be lawful for such Constable, Tithingman, or other Peace Officer, when any Refusal or Resistance shall be made, to break open in the Daytime any House or Place where any Goods or Chattels of such Person or Persons shall be, and if no sufficient Distress can be had or taken whereon to levy the said Debt and Charges, then such Justice or Justices shall commit such Person or Persons to the Prison of such County, Riding, Division, City, Town, or Place, there to remain until such Debt and Charges shall be fully paid and satisfied.

XXIX. And be it further enacted, That every Complaint, Information, Summons, Conviction, Warrant of Distress or Commitment, or other such Proceeding, which shall be had or taken under the Provisions of this Act for the Recovery of any Postage or Postage Debt, may be drawn or made out according to the several Forms contained in the Schedule hereunto annexed, or to the Effect thereof, mutatis mutandis, as the Case shall require, and every such Complaint, Information, Summons, Conviction, Warrant, or other such Proceeding which shall be so drawn or made out shall be good and effectual to all Intents and Purposes whatsoever, without stating the Case or the Facts or Evidence in any more particular Manner than is required in and by such Forms respectively ; and that wherever the Term ” Officer of the Post Office” occurs in this Act or the Schedule thereto, the same shall be construed to mean and include any Deputy, Agent, Officer, Clerk, Letter Carrier, or other Person employed by or under the Post Office, whatever may be his particular Office or Employment ; and that whenever the Term “East Indies” occurs in this Act, the same shall be construed to mean and include every Port and Place within the Limits of the Charter of the United Company of Merchants commonly called The East India Company, not being in China ; and that whenever in this Act or the Schedule thereto, with reference to any Person, Matter, or Thing, any Word or Words is or are used importing the Singular Number or the Masculine Gender only, yet such Word or Words shall be understood to include several Persons as well as one Person, Females as well as Males, Bodies Politic or Corporate as well as Individuals, and several Matters or Things as well as one Matter or Thing, unless it be otherwise specially provided, or there be something in the Subject or Context repugnant to such Construction.

XXX. And be it further enacted, That all Actions and Prosecutions which shall be brought or commenced against any Person for any thing done in pursuance or under the Authority of this Act shall be commenced and prosecuted within Three Calendar Months next after the Fact committed, and not afterwards, and shall be brought and tried in the County or Place where the Cause of Action shall arise, and not elsewhere ; and Notice in Writing of such Action, and of the Cause thereof, shall be given to the Defendant One Calendar Month at least before the Commencement of the Action ; and the Defendant in such Action may plead the General Issue, and give this Act and any other Matter or Thing in Evidence at any Trial to be had thereupon ; and if the Cause of Action shall appear to arise from any Matter or Thing done in pursuance and by the Authority of this Act, or if any such Action shall be brought after the Expiration of such Three Calendar Months, or shall be brought in any other County or Place than as aforesaid, or if Notice of such Action shall not have been given in manner aforesaid, or if Tender sufficient Amends shall have been made before such Action commenced, or if a sufficient Sum of Money shall have been paid into Court after such Action commenced by or on behalf of the Defendant, the Jury shall find a Verdict for the Defendant ; and if a Verdict shall pass for the Defendant, or if the Plaintiff shall become Nonsuit, or shall discontinue any such Action, or if on Demurrer, or otherwise Judgment shall be given against the Plaintiff, the Defendant shall recover his or her full Costs of Suit as between Attorney and Client, and shall have the like Remedy for the same as any Defendant may have for Costs of Suit in other Cases at Law ; and although a Verdict shall be given for the Plaintiff in any such Action, such Plaintiff shall not have Costs against the Defendant unless the Judge before whom the Trial shall be had shall at the Time of such Trial certify in Writing his Approbation of the Action and of the Verdict obtained thereupon.

XXXI. And be it further enacted, That this Act may be amended, altered, or repealed by any Act or Acts to be passed in this present Session of Parliament.


p.s.
At the end of the Act are shown 4 forms:

Form of Complaint whereon to found a Warrant of Distress for Recovery of Postage.
Form of a Summons on the foregoing Complaint.
Form of a Warrant of Distress founded on the foregoing Complaint.
Form of a Warrant of Commitment for Want of sufficient Distress founded on the foregoing Complaint.

I’m not going to add here their contents because they are not of a postal history interest.
No-one ever said it was easy. If it was it would be boring!

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mozzerb
Founder Member Joined April 2007
Founder Member Joined April 2007
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Joined: 18 Apr 2007 03:25
Location: London, UK

Re: Exact wording of Postal Acts of United Kingdom, 1710 onw

Post by mozzerb »

Just a note that these and many other British and Irish postal acts can be found on the Great Britain Philatelic Society website, along with various other source texts:

http://www.gbps.org.uk/sources

http://www.gbps.org.uk/acts

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