"Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Stampboards has 1000s of regular readers who WILL take the time to help out even with the most basic question. If you are new to stamps - or taking up the hobby after a long break, there is a lot to learn. PLEASE do not be shy in asking the simplest of questions .. members here will be delighted to help you with the answers!

Moderator: Volunteer Moderator Team

Post Reply
User avatar
The Pom
I was online for Post Number 4 MILLION!
I was online for Post Number 4 MILLION!
Posts: 13836
Joined: 02 May 2007 08:08
Location: Great Britain

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by The Pom »

After a few more repeats of the boiling water/detergent treatment (with a fresh water wash between each soak).

IMG_0015.jpg
IMG_0016.jpg
Always on the lookout for Australian pre decimal First Day Covers.
User avatar
Global Admin
The Sheriff
The Sheriff
Posts: 76404
Joined: 18 Apr 2007 22:57
Location: Tombstone, Oz
Contact:

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Global Admin »

193a92e9f59bdd4855929b18183dd56a.png

We do have a Rock Solid Duty Of Care to members here. The next member who totally ruins a 2/- Violet of this same set, or a £1 Robes etc (both far less colourfast than red) hopefully will send you the bill for their needless loss. 'A Moderator on stampsboards stated it worked just fine' :roll: :roll: :roll:

I've seen ENDLESS blank bits of white paper with perfs all around, and a watermark and nothing else, that used to be those stamps. As some Boy Genius, wanted to play Biggles Own Amateur Chemist.

Things must be VERRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRY quiet in the UK these days if you are spending all day farting about all day with a landfill grade badly damaged common stamp. :roll: :shock:

Global Admin wrote: 20 Sep 2023 10:55
The first thought that crosses my mind is WHY anyone would bother messing at all, wasting £s of time, on an ugly thinned, foxed, ripped perf stamp worth 1c even in superb condition.

I learned 45 years ago never to expect logic in stamp collector thought processes. :lol: :lol: :lol:

Folks, in ADDITION to the advice re losing 'sizing' etc above, these 1935 Jubilee stamps were printed on CHALK SURFACED SECURITY PAPER.

Normal stamp paper, onto which a coating of finely powdered chalk was rolled onto, in the paper mill, and smoothed flat under pressure rollers.

Gives a wonderfully smooth coating for recess intaglio printing versus usual uneven stamp paper, which has lots of troughs and peaks in the final finish under magnification.

Expensive, and used mainly for higher face values like the 2/- Jubilee, 1/- Anzac, 1937 Robes
series etc, as revenue protection. Why?? As the Printer knew any genius trying to mess about cleaning off stamp cancels will remove the top layer of the paper, and all the writing ink upon it, as WELL as the cancels. Bog basic common sense really.

Powdered chalk is powdered chalk. My grandkids play all day with chalk sticks on the terra-cotta pavers outside drawing whales and dinosaurs etc. When they are done, I get the hose out, and in 5 seconds all the chalk is gone. MAGIC. :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:

So using our brains a tad, with this simple example in mind, immersing ANY chalk faced stamp in water starts to loosen the chalk layer from the contact with the underlying paper. Guess what - the INK is printed on top of the chalk ... the Einsteins among us can see where I am headed here! :lol: :lol: :lol:

FakeBay is full of such totally ruined stamps sold as 'severe ink stripping' etc. Baloney - they are vandalised chalk faced stamps, some genius amateur chemist has fiddled with, and ruined forever.

ONE quick dip will have medium results .. any more and your $40 retail 2/- 1935 Jubilee, will have parts of the printed intaglio lines all vanish. TRUST me. As for messing about with landfill like a highly defective 2d Jubilee .......

Glen
.
Click HERE to see superb RARE & unusual stamps - FIXED low nett prices, high rez pix + NO 20% buyer fees!
User avatar
Rigs
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1806
Joined: 10 Apr 2019 15:51
Location: Port Macquarie, Australia

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Rigs »

The below stamp was removed from an ancient 'schoolboy' album over the weekend, and I cleaned it up using .....

IMG_0768.JPG


.
User avatar
Global Admin
The Sheriff
The Sheriff
Posts: 76404
Joined: 18 Apr 2007 22:57
Location: Tombstone, Oz
Contact:

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Global Admin »

Global Admin wrote: 20 Sep 2023 22:45
We do have a Rock Solid Duty Of Care to members here. The next member who totally ruins a 2/- Violet of this same set, or a £1 Robes etc (both far less colourfast than red) hopefully will send you the bill for their needless loss.

Rigs .. just one post after this firm advice, you launch into your Mad Chemist revelation, now deleted. :roll: :roll: :roll:

I can assure you trying that on the 2.5d or 4d of the same series will RUIN those stamps. EVERY ink colour reacts differently to the same product. Some survive, some do not. You just got lucky. A blind pig finds a truffle now and again.

Wreck your own stamps by all means if you wish, but I am not having this board used as some sort of Loopy Alchemy Experimental Ground, and your Mad Professor tip is deleted, to likely save others from themselves.

Eucalyptus Oil does of course remove/minimise a lot of oily stains like that, and some cellotape stains, and similar sticky gook etc, etc, and will generally NOT ruin stamp inks. That is proven, and is a natural non chemical substance.

Admin
User avatar
Kilowarekid
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 197
Joined: 15 Feb 2022 02:05
Location: Mallow, ireland

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Kilowarekid »

Certainly there is a lot of evidence that chemical treatment of stamps is very risky.

KK
I love communist stamps for their colour, design and history.
User avatar
InTheGreatKhansTent
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 134
Joined: 23 Jun 2023 08:01
Location: Plano, Texas, United States
Contact:

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by InTheGreatKhansTent »

I had some foxing on my kiloware purchase so for the time being I tried the method used here. Only boiling water, from the kettle, for one minute dip and then dried.

First here are the offending stamps in question:

Two UN stamps in blocks of 4:
IMG_4993.jpg
IMG_4995.jpg
And a group shot including one from Austria and One from Poland showing their backs because that is where I found it:
IMG_4996.jpg
Here they are from their one minute boiling hot water bath:
IMG_4998.jpg
On drying the Austria and Poland showed no signs of Foxing left:
IMG_5004.jpg
While the two 4 blocks of UN stamps showed some improvement, the 50c one hasn't changed much while the $1 one has shown some improvement.
IMG_5005.jpg
User avatar
InTheGreatKhansTent
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 134
Joined: 23 Jun 2023 08:01
Location: Plano, Texas, United States
Contact:

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by InTheGreatKhansTent »

I decided to give the UN stamps a second bath in boiling hot water, this time for 2 minutes to see if there is any difference based on the time left in the boiling water. First, here are the two stamps dried from the front after their one minute boiling hot water bath:
IMG_5002.jpg
but there was no change in the 50c one and I didn't notice many changes in the $1 one. I wish I had taken pictures but I'll provide them as they are now. My guess is that one minute is a good time for soaking and any more does not really have any additional effects.
User avatar
InTheGreatKhansTent
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Senior Member Advanced Posting Guru
Posts: 134
Joined: 23 Jun 2023 08:01
Location: Plano, Texas, United States
Contact:

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by InTheGreatKhansTent »

I did a second group of a Boiling Water from the Kettle Bath and some dark spots appeared on the backs which confused me. I only did it once, but is this ink running or the leftover glue that has gone bad?
IMG_5030.jpg
User avatar
polisciguy2011
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
RED Shooting Star Posting LEGEND!
Posts: 1304
Joined: 27 Jul 2018 10:39
Location: Rhode Island, USA

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by polisciguy2011 »

It almost looks burnt to my eyes, though I'm not sure that's possible without an open flame. Maybe the gum got scorched by the water temperature?

(Note: I'm neither a chemist nor a physicist, so this suggestion may well be very daft. :lol: )
-- Zach --
Collecting Interests: Benelux, Scandinavia, German area, Sarawak, KGV Silver Jubilee, Italy, Spain, Israel, France/Colonies
User avatar
Global Admin
The Sheriff
The Sheriff
Posts: 76404
Joined: 18 Apr 2007 22:57
Location: Tombstone, Oz
Contact:

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Global Admin »

Well seeing you did not have the sense to show us BEFORE images, it is just bad mould mostly staying there.

If they were in the same appalling condition as this below you showed, anyone sane would just bin them.

I know time means absolutely nothing, to most collectors, and spending hours on this stuff and playing amateur Chemist is just 'FUN FUN FUN' .... but junk bin material, is junk bin material, to most savvy owners. :!:

Glen
Image
.
Click HERE to see superb RARE & unusual stamps - FIXED low nett prices, high rez pix + NO 20% buyer fees!
User avatar
RedKiwi
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 606
Joined: 18 Mar 2022 12:34
Location: On the move

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by RedKiwi »

I brought this nice 1919 NZ Insurance cover on eBay. As can be seen in the image, it's a very tidy cover with only one tone spot on the perfs of the stamp. Any suggestions on how to deal with the spot to prevent the tone from spreading?
NZ Insurance 1919 cover.jpg
Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made
User avatar
audiolover70s
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Black Ninja Star! Board Posting Addict.
Posts: 85
Joined: 25 Dec 2023 02:24
Location: Kfar Saba, Israel

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by audiolover70s »

InTheGreatKhansTent wrote: 14 Nov 2023 08:55 ...I had some foxing on my kiloware purchase so for the time being I tried the method used here. Only boiling water, from the kettle, for one minute dip and then dried...
I think that after treatment with hot water (after boiling), the remaining red spots, also known as “foxing,” can no longer spread, they remain noticeable, but they are dead!
User avatar
Catweazle
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
WINNER! Stampboards Poster Of The Month
Posts: 5139
Joined: 15 Nov 2009 21:18
Location: Geelong, Victoria, Australia
Contact:

Re: "Rust" and Foxing etc on stamps. How best to store them?

Post by Catweazle »

From Glen's recent listing of some glassines:
Glassines are ESSENTIAL in this climate for storing stamps. I've came across 40 year old stock items that in GLASSINESS that are still in perfect untoned condition. In stockbooks or Hagners etc, these WILL have toned/foxed. The waxy material is a superb barrier to moisture and humidity.
Curious here: might this be in reference to stockbooks or hagners not housed in slipcases?

Are glassines then actually better for long term 40 years storage than say Lighthouse slipcased stockbooks, besides the obvious lack of aesthetics and ease of browsing?

Do we have stockbooks or albums made of largely the same stuff as glasssines, or is that what the glassine inter-pages are for?

Is there a difference between the clear page dividers (like that in the link I added above) and glassine type inter-pages (like those pictured below)?
140346.png@p0x0-q85-M1200x1000.jpg
Collecting Stamps & Postal History of Molokai | Polar Regions in WWII | Chatham Islands | Lord Howe Island | Greenland et hoc genus omne
Post Reply

Return to “NO question is too basic or silly - you ask - we WILL help you with it!”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests