Stamps motivate us to engage with different languages - try it out here

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RogerE
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

Hello Brit-Col. I would say that, for you, your Thailand "souvenir" is a memento, because you personally acquired it during a visit to Bangkok, so it reminds you of that occasion. If you give it or sell it to someone else who didn't accompany you on that trip, it would not be a memento for them.

On the other hand, it was produced in Thailand, and comprises items of a sort commonly used in Thailand, so it was issued with the intention that it would represent an aspect of daily life in Thailand. In that sense, it was created to be a souvenir of Thailand. For you, as well as any future owner, it is therefore a souvenir — even though for you alone it is a memento. It is not a sheetlet or miniature sheet — the stamps are attached, not a printed part of the backing.

Those are my suggestions. Others might have a different set of ideas about the terms, and wish to use their own ideas. But it is surely not a matter of objective right or wrong, it is rather a matter of how "central" my ideas are when it come to use of the terms being discussed.
______________


Your example of the bonnet or hood of an automobile is a nice one. When it comes to specific parts of an automobile, those two terms seem to be pretty much interchangeable. However, as general terms bonnet and hood include a much larger range of meanings than just the name of a part of an automobile, and that's where they cease to be universally interchangeable. "Hoodies" have hoods, not bonnets. A bonnet can be worn by a woman, but not a man. And so on.

One last comment: I prefer to think of "clouds of meaning" rather than Venn diagrams of meaning, because clouds have indefinite boundaries, whereas Venn Diagrams are hard-edge and so appear to be more definitive and sharp in their scope...

/RogerE 🦉
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by nigelc »

Hello Roger,

I really like your "clouds of meaning" idea. To me, this suggests not only an indefinite border but also a sense of movement or change of emphasis over time.

On the subject of borders and bonnets, do you know the old Scots song, "The blue bonnets are over the border"? ;)

March, march, Ettrick and Teviotdale,
Why, my lads, dinna ye march forward in order?
March, march, Eskdale and Liddesdale,
All the blue bonnets are over the border.
Many a banner spread, flutters above your head,
Many a crest that is famous in story,
Mount and make ready then, sons of the mountain glen,
Fight for your Queen and the old Scottish glory.


This version is by Walter Scott.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by Brit-Col »

RogerE wrote: 22 Feb 2024 01:38 One last comment: I prefer to think of "clouds of meaning" rather than Venn diagrams of meaning, because clouds have indefinite boundaries, whereas Venn Diagrams are hard-edge and so appear to be more definitive and sharp in their scope...
Ah, but just for the sake of friendly debate, cannot clouds function as Venn diagrams? Consider the following example I whipped up.
IMG_3733.png
Just because they’ve conventionally been drawn with circles doesn’t mean the same concept can’t be conveyed with other shapes.

Also, if I really wanted to be pedantic, don’t clouds have a definite boundary - the point where water vapor no longer condenses?

Either way, I think we’re getting at the same point. Many words can vary in meaning depending upon such things as context, intonation, usage, pronunciation, and so on.

BC
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

Yes, Venn diagrams don't need to be built from circles.

A nice mathematical problem is to find a shape S so that n suitably located shapes each congruent to S determine a set of 2^n "elementary" regions, and therefore serve geometrically to represent all the possibilities for n true/false characteristics. Choosing S to be a convex shape is a common but not essential further requirement. The difficulty increases with n.

Combinatorial geometer Branko Grünbaum has famously studied and contributed to this problem:

An arrangement of 5 congruent oval regions<br />determining a total of 32 &quot;elementary&quot; regions<br /> appropriate for a Venn diagram of 5 categories
An arrangement of 5 congruent oval regions
determining a total of 32 "elementary" regions
appropriate for a Venn diagram of 5 categories
https://demonstrations.wolfram.com/GrunbaumsVennDiagram/


My cloud model for word meanings is intentionally fuzzy-edged, rather than sharp-edged as in Branko Grünbaum's oval Venn diagram model:

Real clouds<br />Acknowledgement: Pakhnyushchy/Shutterstock
Real clouds
Acknowledgement: Pakhnyushchy/Shutterstock
.
Perhaps it's worth mentioning that there are various artistic conventions about how clouds are represented. The conventions in Chinese art, for instance, are familiar and characteristic:

Chinese clouds<br />Acknowledgement: Shutterstock
Chinese clouds
Acknowledgement: Shutterstock
.
/RogerE 🦉

Footnote: Thanks nigelc for Walter Scott's poem. Yes, those blue bonnets were definitely proud warrior identifiers...
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by Brit-Col »

RogerE,

Very interesting. But I’m still unsure of exactly what your cloud model is meant to represent.

Take this simple example:
IMG_3737.png
Let it represent the “continuum of the color orange.” Point A can be described as having the value (R=100%, Y=0%). Point B is (R=50%, Y=50%). Point C is (R=0%, Y=100%). Alternatively Point A can be assigned the label “Red,” Point B “Orange,” and Point C “Yellow.”

Any point in the circle can be described in a similar manner - at least until you run out of words to decribe specific hues. (Which, incidentally, is a problem faced by editors of stamp catalogues.)

The key thing in this model is that the precise value, or the meaning if you will, comes from the position within the circle - which could just as easily be a square, or an oval, or a cloud.

Or, does your model suggest that the fuzziness of the clouds implies that the meaning (or value) of the objects or words within the cloud is also fuzzy and that a precise meaning for a given situation requires some influence from outside the cloud?

Say for example a cloud that contains all the variations of the emotion of elation. These can be expressed with a number of synonyms, or near synonyms: joy, happiness, glee, ecstasy, delight, etc. Is it a context from outside the cloud that dictates which synonym with which nuance of meaning is the most appropriate?

In short, if the goal is to precisely communicate one’s intent or meaning, how does a fuzzy cloud help?

BC

Note: I’ve tried to include some reference to philately in my posts to stay nominally on topic. Apologies if this is getting too far off.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

Hello Brit-Col.

You seem to have been thinking that a diagram representing the scope of meaning of a particular word should be a very precise map of the various meanings, with each point corresponding to a particular shade of meaning. My analogy was much less prescriptive and not intended to be a one-to-one map of shades of meaning. I simply wanted it to suggest that there is typically a range of meanings for a particular word, its scope is not very sharply defined, and no doubt the scope for one person is not quite identical with the range and scope for another person. A relevant remark by nigelc suggests that it may modify over time as well.

Perhaps the original analogy is worth a second visit:
It is arguable that synonyms are not quite identical in meaning, but have significant overlap. If we use a "cloud" analogy to represent the scope of meaning of a word, the clouds representing two synonyms might overlap considerably, without fully coinciding. There may be common usages where replacing one by the other makes no detectable difference to a given statement. On the other hand, there may be usages near the boundary of one of the clouds where the second cloud does not extend, and the intended meaning would be changed or even lost if one word of a pair is replaced by the other. Consider too, the cloud of meaning of a particular word for one person is probably not quite identical with the cloud of meaning for that word for any other person. Language and communication seen in this way are approximations with conventions and compromises and working agreements. Words are not jigsaw puzzle pieces with exact predetermined locations...
Your comments about colour descriptions touch on a recurring philatelic problem area. It is notorious that any one colour word is insufficient to pick out a single colour from within a range of shades/hues. This fits in well with your preference to have a one-to-one correspondence between meanings and points of a diagram.

I have argued elsewhere that the technology of screen colours has provided a hexadecimal code for specifying a particular colour, which is much more objective than use of colour words. For example:

Colour FC6F03
Colour FC6F03
https://www.google.com/search?q=hexadecimal+colour+selector


Perhaps we've got to a point where our discussion of word meanings could do with a rest. I hope you're OK with that.


/RogerE 🦉
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by Brit-Col »

RogerE wrote: 23 Feb 2024 11:20 Perhaps we've got to a point where our discussion of word meanings could do with a rest. I hope you're OK with that.
Yes, indeed. Let’s get back to stamps and language! My apologies for taking us off track.

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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

:D

In another thread (Art on Stamps) the evocative paintings of Canadian artist Jean Paul Lemieux (1904–1990) were shown by Zenfizz.
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?p=11488089#p11488089
.
Canada, 2004: Minisheet celebrating art of Jean Paul Lemieux<br />(Sc 2068; SG MS2299; Mi BL70; Yv BF70)
Canada, 2004: Minisheet celebrating art of Jean Paul Lemieux
(Sc 2068; SG MS2299; Mi BL70; Yv BF70)
I followed with some comments that probably have a natural home in this Stamps and Languages thread.
RogerE wrote: 24 Feb 2024 00:08 They are sad, lonely images that Lemieux shares with us, not the memories of happy events but the sadness of time passing, leaving events irretrievably in its wake... He rather belies his own name, giving us that sadder rather than the better view of the past.

While the English translations capture some of that sense, the French strikes the tone so much more poetically:
Jean Paul Lemieux wrote: Ce qui me hante le plus,
c'est le temps qui passe,
le temps qui est passé...
Anne Hébert wrote:...le temps perdu hante toute l'oeuvre de Lemieux
.
/RogerE 🦉
Translation is always a challenge, and always falls short, more or less. But it is a worthy challenge to do justice to the original text. My modest suggestion:
A reflection of Jean Paul Lemieux:
What haunts me most
is the passing of time,
time irrevocably past...
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

A chain of online searches, beginning with charity seals raising money for tuberculosis treatment and research, has led me to this 2008 USA commemorative:
Edward Trudeau

USA, 2008: 76c Edward Trudeau<br />Lower right plate block of four, self-adhesives<br />(Sc 3432A; SG 4852; Mi 4370; Yv 4041)<br />eBay: 194583838049
USA, 2008: 76c Edward Trudeau
Lower right plate block of four, self-adhesives
(Sc 3432A; SG 4852; Mi 4370; Yv 4041)
eBay: 194583838049
The Mayo Foundation wrote:Edward Livingston Trudeau (1848-1915), an American physician, established the
Adirondack Cottage Sanatorium at Saranac Lake, NY, in 1884.
The sanatorium housed patients with tuberculosis and served as a research facility.
.
This stamp motivates some linguistic thoughts appropriate to the Stamps and Languages thread.

I wonder how many users of this stamp appreciated why Edward Trudeau was worthy of commemoration and appreciation. Surely the epithet Phthisiologist would not have enlightened many in 2008. I suggest that an alternative, such as Tuberculosis pioneer, would have communicated his importance much better, even if it is not quite so technically specific.

Let's look into the etymology a little, to better understand Phthisiologist.
Wikipedia wrote:phthisis (... plural phthises) (archaic) An atrophy of the body or part of the body, especially pulmonary tuberculosis.

Etymology
Borrowed from Latin phthisis, from Ancient Greek φθίσις (phthísis, “consumption, decline, wasting away”), from φθίω (phthíō, “I waste away”).

Pronunciation
IPA: /ˈ(f)θaɪsɪs/, /ˈtaɪsɪs/
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/phthisis#
.
So, it is pronounced like "thigh-sis" or "ff-thigh-sis" or even "tie-sis"... Within English, the spelling is remarkable.

Some further insights:
Tuberculosis = phthisis = consumption
Tuberculosis was also known as phthisis and consumption from Hippocrates through to the 18th century, the white death and the great white plague during the 19th century, and other names which evoked the despair and horror of the disease such as the robber of youth, the Captain of all these men of Death, the graveyard cough, and the King’s-Evill. During the 18th and 19th centuries tuberculosis was epidemic in Europe and caused millions of deaths, particularly in the poorer classes of society. Tuberculosis declined after the late 19th century but remained a major public health issue as it still is today.
The same source provides this perspective:
Tuberculosis is an infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis which can occur in any organ of the body but is most well known in the lung. It has been a scourge throughout known history and may have killed more persons than any other microbial pathogen. Paleopathological evidence dates back to 8000 BCE and evidence of bony tuberculosis has been found dating from the Neolithic period in 5800 BCE and in Egyptian mummies dating to 2400 BCE.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

RogerE wrote: 20 Feb 2024 18:26 Catweazle is running a special thread to commemorate his reaching 5000 posts. That thread ends on 29 Feb 2024, so just over a week left to run.
Catweazle's 5000 post celebratory giveaway

Update: Now less than 50hrs left to run :o
...
_____________
.
Numeral systems are very much a part of language learning so, from Catweazle's celebratory thread, I'm happy to reproduce this revised one page entry by teus here:


A one page selection by teus, on numeral postmarks:

One page display by teus<br />(Identification of Hindi and Urdu numerals revised)
One page display by teus
(Identification of Hindi and Urdu numerals revised)
.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

I have just added a post in another thread, showing some Azerbaijani stamps:
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?t=102805&start=6187


It struck me that the text looks as though it uses the Turkish alphabet:

Azerbaijan, 1995
Butterflies-1995.jpg
Azərbaycan PoçtuAzerbaijan Post
kəpənəkləributterflies
Butterfly sheetlet, four stamps, 10m+25m+50m+60m = 145m
(Mi 195-198KB, SG MS216, Sc 473a, Yv BF17)


Azerbaijani language
Azerbaijani
The primary and official language of Azerbaijan is Azerbaijani, a Turkic language closely related to and partially mutually intelligible with Modern Turkish. Together with Turkish, Turkmen and Gagauz, Azerbaijani is a member of Oghuz branch of southwestern group Turkic language family.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Languages_of_Azerbaijan#
.
Screenshot 2024-04-09 at 8.24.09 pm.png
Azerbaijani (/ˌæzərbaɪˈdʒæni, -ɑːni/ AZ-ər-by-JAN-ee) or Azeri (/æˈzɛəri, ɑː-, ə-/ az-AIR-ee, ah-, ə-), also referred to as Azeri Turkic or Azeri Turkish, is a Turkic language from the Oghuz sub-branch. It is spoken primarily by the Azerbaijani people, who live mainly in the Republic of Azerbaijan where the North Azerbaijani variety is spoken, and in the Azerbaijan region of Iran, where the South Azerbaijani variety is spoken. North Azerbaijani has official status in the Republic of Azerbaijan and Dagestan (a federal subject of Russia), but South Azerbaijani does not have official status in Iran, where the majority of Azerbaijani people live. Azerbaijani language is also spoken to lesser varying degrees in Azerbaijani communities of Georgia and Turkey and by diaspora communities, primarily in Europe and North America...

As of 2011, there are some 9.23 million speakers of North Azerbaijani including 4 million monolingual speakers (many North Azerbaijani speakers also speak Russian, as is common throughout former USSR countries). The Shirvan dialect as spoken in Baku is the basis of standard [Northern] Azerbaijani. Since 1992, it has been officially written with a Latin script in the Republic of Azerbaijan, but the older Cyrillic script was still widely used in the late 1990s...

Below are some cognates with different spelling in Azerbaijani and Turkish:
Screenshot 2024-04-09 at 8.51.42 pm.png
The Azerbaijani Latin alphabet is based on the Turkish Latin alphabet, which in turn was based on the former Azerbaijani Latin alphabet because of their linguistic connections and mutual intelligibility. The letters Әə, Xx, and Qq are available only in Azerbaijani for sounds which do not exist as separate phonemes in Turkish.
Screenshot 2024-04-09 at 9.03.01 pm.png
Screenshot 2024-04-09 at 9.03.42 pm.png
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azerbaijani_language
.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

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The term cliché has been coined to refer to phrases that were originally neatly constructed, but have subsequently been used repeatedly and without originality by others wishing to "improve" their own writing styles by incorporating someone else's originality... No wonder we grow disenchanted by repeated use of a cliché.

May I point out a small cluster of time-related clichés that have recently been overused.
Rather than simply naming one time unit, the clichés link two time units, the second of which is an immediately larger time unit than the first. A "pretty" linkage when first constructed, but unoriginal and imprecise superficial "dressing" when later frequently reused by others:

"Over the following minutes and hours..."
"In coming days and weeks..."
"Over coming weeks and months..."
"During coming months and years..."

/RogerE 🦉
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

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Recent events in Australia have raised our awareness of Aramaic, and the ancient script in which it is written,
Wikipedia wrote: Aramaic (Jewish Babylonian Aramaic: ארמית, romanized: ˀərāmiṯ; Classical Syriac: ܐܪܡܐܝܬ, romanized: arāmāˀiṯ[a]) is a Northwest Semitic language that originated in the ancient region of Syria and quickly spread to Mesopotamia, the southern Levant, southeastern Anatolia, Eastern Arabia and the Sinai Peninsula, where it has been continually written and spoken in different varieties for over three thousand years.

Aramaic served as a language of public life and administration of ancient kingdoms and empires, and also as a language of divine worship and religious study. Several modern varieties, the Neo-Aramaic languages, are still spoken by the Assyrians, Mandeans, Mizrahi Jews and by the Arameans (Syriacs) in the towns of Maaloula and nearby Jubb'adin in Syria. Aramaic is used as the liturgical language of several West Asian [Orthodox Christian] churches.

Aramaic belongs to the Northwest group of the Semitic language family, which also includes the mutually intelligible Canaanite languages such as Hebrew, Edomite, Moabite, Ekronite, Sutean, and Phoenician, as well as Amorite and Ugaritic. Aramaic languages are written in the Aramaic alphabet, a descendant of the Phoenician alphabet, and the most prominent alphabet variant is the Syriac alphabet. The Aramaic alphabet also became a base for the creation and adaptation of specific writing systems in some other Semitic languages of West Asia, such as the Hebrew alphabet and the Arabic alphabet.

The Aramaic languages are now considered endangered, with several varieties used mainly by the older generations. Researchers are working to record and analyze all of the remaining varieties of Neo-Aramaic languages before they or in case they become extinct. Aramaic dialects today form the mother tongues of the Arameans (Syriacs) in the Qalamoun mountains, Assyrians and Mandaeans, as well as some Mizrahi Jews.

Early Aramaic inscriptions date from 11th century BC, placing it among the earliest languages to be written down. Aramaicist Holger Gzella notes, "The linguistic history of Aramaic prior to the appearance of the first textual sources in the ninth century BC remains unknown." ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aramaic

Amen_in_East_Syriac_Aramaic_language.svg.png
Amen in Eastern Syriac
.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

Actual varieties of the script used for various versions of Aramaic / Syriac
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Syriac_alphabet#West_Syriac_Ser%E1%B9%AD%C4%81

The Syriac alphabet (ܐܠܦ ܒܝܬ ܣܘܪܝܝܐ ʾālep̄ bêṯ Sūryāyā[a]) is a writing system primarily used to write the Syriac language since the 1st century AD. It is one of the Semitic abjads descending from the Aramaic alphabet through the Palmyrene alphabet, and shares similarities with the Phoenician, Hebrew, Arabic and Sogdian, the precursor and a direct ancestor of the traditional Mongolian scripts.
Screenshot 2024-04-16 at 9.25.00 pm.png
.

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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

On Friday I received a "bit of everything" postcard from Redmond = RevRed+ in Ireland/Eire. I have shown it in the "nice covers" thread, at
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?p=11567725#p11567725


There are also some nice linguistic dimensions to the postcard, which I would like to share here.

Screenshot 2024-04-20 at 10.49.38 pm.png
Two signs with a quintessential Irish flavour:
Céad Míle FáilteA hundred thousand welcomes
Tá telefon ar fáil annsoA telephone is available there/here
The offered English translation You may telephone from here
is very polite, but charmingly not quite colloquial.
ar fáilis available — compare with French il y a
annsoin it
.
Screenshot 2024-04-20 at 10.51.54 pm.png
The text at the top of the address side begins with
Greetings from Ireland,
and adds the same message in eleven more languages!
.
Beannachtaí na hÉireann — Irish
Grüße aus Irland — German
Saluti dall'Irlanda — Italian
Salutations d'Irlande — French
Saluti dall'Irlanda — Italian (again!)
Saludos de Irlanda — Spanish
Sveikinimai iš Airijos — Lithuanian (o—>a)
Cumprimentos de Ireland — Portuguese
来自爱尔兰的问候 — Chinese (simplified) (*)
Posdravlenija iz Irlandiji — Bosnian
Groeten uit Ierland — Dutch
アイルランドからのご挨拶 — Japanese (**)

(*) 来自爱尔兰的问候 = Láizì ài'ěrlán de wènhòu
(**) アイルランドからのご挨拶 = Airurando kara no go aisatsu
.
Note: Using Google Translate produces a three character ending (as shown) to the Japanese text, different from the version on the postcard. Also several sources show the spelling "Sveikinimai" rather than the postcard's version "Sveikinimoi" for the Lithuanian text.
.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

With some effort (and help from Jisho), I think I have reproduced the Japanese text actually appearing on the postcard. I believe it is


アイルランドからの 風 便 い

= Airurando kara no kaze-bin i
.
Google Translate suggests that this means Wind from Ireland.
I'm not sure whether "wind" is a metaphor for a greeting or welcome,
or whether the person choosing the Japanese text to put on the postcard
simply made a mistake.
It would be helpful if satsuma or another Stampboards member could comment.
.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by satsuma »

RogerE wrote: 21 Apr 2024 04:07 With some effort (and help from Jisho), I think I have reproduced the Japanese text actually appearing on the postcard. I believe it is


アイルランドからの 風 便 い

= Airurando kara no kaze-bin i

Google Translate suggests that this means Wind from Ireland.
I'm not sure whether "wind" is a metaphor for a greeting or welcome,
or whether the person choosing the Japanese text to put on the postcard
simply made a mistake.
It would be helpful if satsuma or another Stampboards member could comment.
.
/RogerE 🦉
Hi Roger
When the last kana is correctly identified it reads
アイルランドからの 風 便
= Airurando kara no kazedayori

The colloquial translation is as it says in English: Greetings from Ireland

The literal translation would be:
Greetings on the wind from Ireland.
or
Reminders of Ireland
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

Excellent reply by satsuma :D
That was exactly the help I was needing!

どうもありがとうございます!
[Dōmo arigatōgozaimasu!]
Thank you very much!
(with assistance from Google Translate)


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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

In the Happy Day thread there has been some recent discussion about the Swedish abbreviation AB
https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?t=102805&start=6442
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Here is a short list of common Swedish abbreviations and acronyms:

Swedish acronyms and abbreviations
Screenshot 2024-04-21 at 10.45.04 pm.png
Screenshot 2024-04-21 at 10.45.29 pm.png
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

I have just come across a modern technological term that others will find interesting and potentially useful :D

Transclusion

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Screenshot 2024-05-03 at 5.34.30 pm.png
https://www.mediawiki.org/wiki/Transclusion


It is natural to follow up with corresponding definitions for hypertext and hypermedia, and a brief "biosketch" of Ted Nelson, who coined them — see the following posts.
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

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Sistema_hipertextual.jpg
Hyperlinks between hypertext documents
Acknowledgement: Robert Cailliau
Hypertext

Screenshot 2024-05-03 at 6.06.02 pm.png
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hypertext


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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

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Theodore [Ted] Nelson

Screenshot 2024-05-03 at 5.49.08 pm.png
Theodor Holm Nelson (born June 17, 1937) is an American pioneer of information technology, philosopher, and sociologist. He coined the terms hypertext and hypermedia in 1963 and published them in 1965.
According to a 1997 Forbes profile, Nelson "sees himself as a literary romantic, like a Cyrano de Bergerac, or 'the Orson Welles of software'."
Screenshot 2024-05-03 at 6.47.54 pm.png
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ted_Nelson


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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with languages

Post by RogerE »

Stamps directly representing these new technological terms have yet to appear, but there are many that remind us of the impact of the computer revolution:

Screenshot 2024-05-03 at 7.12.50 pm.png
Great Britain, 2007
Globe as Web — Internet and e-mail (72p self-adhesive)
(SG 2725; Sc 2448; Mi 2500; Yv 2863)
From eBay item 315321537139
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Screenshot 2024-05-03 at 7.24.14 pm.png
USA, 2000
Celebrating the World Wide Web
Unaddressed first day cover
(Sc 3191n; SG 3776; Mi 3301; Yv 3080)
eBay item 276423481000
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s-l960.jpg
Micronesia, 2013
Minisheet: the Internet, 30th anniversary
(Sc 1043; Mi 2508-2510KB; Yv 2046-2048)
eBay item 296287275702


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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with different languages - try it out here

Post by RogerE »

Irish stamps typically have text in Irish and English. (If their subject is natural history, they routinely include the scientific name of their subject, so arguably those stamps also include Latin and/or Greek!)

Some lovely modern examples:
s-l1600.jpg
Éire/Ireland, 1997, 10p
Cruidín — Kingfisher — Alcedo atthis
(SG 1035; Sc 1079; Mi 1019A; Yv 1024)
eBay item 156196987729
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s-l1600.jpg
Éire/Ireland, 1998, 5p
Colm coille — Woodpigeon — Columba palumbus
(SG 1034; Sc 1105; Mi 1050A; Yv 1057)
eBay item 156196986548
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Screenshot 2024-05-11 at 10.02.30 pm.png
Éire/Ireland, 1998, 45p
Smólach — Song Thrush — Turdus philomelos
(SG 1057; Sc 1109; Mi 1054C; Yv 1061)
eBay item 145767265987
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There are variations of these stamps, so the catalogue
numbers cited might not exactly match the examples shown
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Irish Language
It is natural to wonder just how much the Irish language is in everyday use in Ireland.
I recently received an interesting map from RevRed+ about the extent of use of Irish:

thumbnail_IMG_0003.jpg
Ireland: Irish Speaking Regions
The current Gaeltacht/Irish-speaking regions, in green.
Main counties: Donegal, Mayo, Galway, Kerry.
Smaller enclaves in counties Cork, Waterford, Meath.
Several offshore islands are predominantly Irish-speaking.
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RevRed+ also sent me this brief one-page discussion of the origins, evolution and current levels of support of Gaelic/Irish. Thank you RevRed+ — I hope you don't mind that I've decided to share the information with others visiting Stampboards:
.
thumbnail_IMG_0004_NEW.jpg
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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with different languages - try it out here

Post by RogerE »

I've just found a short thread giving examples of garbled machine translation of eBay listings.
If you want to browse some examples, the link is
Garbled machine translations
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I'm also going to grumble about Stampboards moderation of titles of threads. The title of the present thread has apparently been recently "improved" to "Stamps motivate us to engage with different languages - try it out here". Particularly the "try it out here" was never part of the original title, and seems to (inappropriately) suggest that some kind of interactive learning will be provided by this thread. This kind of unilateral "improvement" to clarify the purpose of a thread tends to skew or misrepresent the original intention of the thread. It would surely be more considerate/respectful of contributors' work if it was first the subject of behind-the-scenes e-mail discussion between moderator and contributor, rather than a "judges decisions are final and no correspondence will be entered into". Is that fair comment?


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Re: Stamps motivate us to engage with different languages - try it out here

Post by RogerE »

A nice comment from Charlie Pickering's TV program, The Weekly:

AI sounds like a pirate affirmation
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