Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Panterra wrote:In 1942, despairing of any more help from Russia which was by now embroiled in a war with Germany, Tuva began printing its own stamps.

After failing to get a set for their 20th anniversary (as explained earlier in this thread), the Government asked for a set to celebrate the
21st anniversary of independence, and so the local printer carefully engraved a set of five stamps. But only three were finally issued.
Samuel Blekhman wrote:These stamps were designed by the artist V. Dyomin, who worked for the newspaper Тувинская Правда Tuvinskaia Pravda (Tuvinian Truth) in Kyzyl. The stamps were printed at this newspaper's printing works with a single cliché on slices of paper trimmed from the bottom of newspapers. Because of this, the distances between stamps are often different and one stamp is often out of position in relation to another.

The stamps of this series were found in normal postal use and were not on sale in the philatelic shops of the Soviet Union. Almost all of the print run of the stamps was exhausted for postal needs, and only an insignificant quantity of mint stamps, imported by collectors visiting Tuva in 1944-45, came into the hands of collectors.

V. Dyomin subsequently reprinted these stamps using the original clichés at the request of collectors on more than one occasion, sometimes in their normal colours, sometimes in other colours -- none of which were ever used for postage.
Image
Tuva 1942 21st Anniversary of Independence, Tuvan woman, reprint in unissued RED colour.
Not listed in Backman or Mirr catalogues.
The 1942 21st anniversary set is extremely scarce, but the reprints in various fancy colours, made by Comrade Dyomin later to satisfy collector requests, are quite readily available. Here is the red version.

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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Another attractive issue from Tuva's "Third Period": 1996 Tropical Fish, Part One. I call this the "Part One series" of Fish, to distinguish it from another set, not yet shown here.
Image
Tuva 1996 Fish, Part One, 100 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1996 Fish, Part One, 225 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1996 Fish, Part One, 450 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1996 Fish, Part One, 675 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1996 Fish, Part One, 900 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1996 Fish, Part One, 1,800 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Tuva was keen to make money from philatelists (like most governments today), and this issue is in the same vein as other "third period" stamps shown earlier in this thread, and are a direct appeal to tropical Fish hobbyists, who would be expected to pay high prices for such a set honouring their deities.

And also to those of us who collect the early Tuva stamps, which we all assumed were a "completed" collection. (But now we need to start paying hugely for the new issues again, just like those folks "lucky" enough to collect exorbitant lands like Ghana, Uganda, Pitcairn, Guyana, and Togo.)

Despite having no sea frontage, and being nowhere near the tropics, these stamps apparently sold well, as evidenced by the fact that they did a second series the following year. And when has ANY stamp-issuer cared about her issues not being relevant to the issuer land?

TFH website wrote:Aquariums: Get the largest aquarium you can possibly manage. It is easier to care for a large aquarium than a small one, and it is much easier to care for a huge aquarium than a tiny one. The reason is simple: maintaining a fish tank is in large part a matter of keeping a complex system in balance; the more water there is, the longer it takes for an imbalance to occur.

Aquariums are heavy, and water is even heavier. For a final weight of tank, stand, gravel, and water, figure about 1.2 kilos per litre of the setup. You must use a stand or cabinet that is specifically designed to hold an aquarium of that size, and you must be certain that the floor under the stand is able to support the weight without problem.

Plants serve two main functions in the aquarium: aesthetics for the aquarist and habitat for the fish. If you are happy with plastic plants, your fish will be too.

Live plants will remove some wastes from the water, but dead leaves add to the bioload. Artificial plants don’t reproduce, but they also don’t grow and change your aquascape over time like live plants will.

Live plants will be preferred by your fish if they are herbivorous—fish that like to eat plants will find the artificial ones a very poor substitute!
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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Another attractive issue from Tuva's "Third Period": 1997 Antarctic Wildlife.

Tuva has little involvement with the Antarctic, although it may contribute staff to the Russian Federation's Mirny Station. But most lands featuring the Antarctic on stamps are located a long way from that chilly continent.
Image
Tuva 1997 Antarctic Wildlife, 450 roubles, Orca.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Antarctic Wildlife, 900 roubles, Penguins bow heads in prayer.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Antarctic Wildlife, 1,800 roubles, Dolphins.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Antarctic Wildlife, 2,100 roubles, Seal.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Antarctic Wildlife, 2,700 roubles, Penguins waiting for the postman.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Antarctic Wildlife, 3,200 roubles, Shark.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Tuva was keen to make money from philatelists (like most governments today), and this issue is in the same vein as other "third period" stamps shown earlier in this thread, and are a direct appeal to Antarctic enthusiasts, who would be expected to pay high prices for such a set honouring their deities.

And also to those of us who collect the early Tuva stamps, which we all assumed were a "completed" collection. (But now we need to start paying hugely for the new issues again, just like those folks "lucky" enough to collect exorbitant lands like Ghana, Uganda, Pitcairn, Guyana, and Togo.)
Wikipedia wrote:The 1913 Australian Antarctic Expedition was the first Antarctic expedition in history, and the only one during the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration, to maintain radio contact with its country of origin. Sidney Jeffryes arrived at the Cape Denison shore base in February 1913 as the base was enduring a near-nightmare situation. The expedition's leader and commander, Douglas Mawson, stumbled into the base, the sole survivor of a sled dog probe eastward along the previously unknown interior coastline of the Australian Antarctic Territory. As the new wireless operator, Jeffryes was able to start the relay of communications that would inform Australia of the expedition leader's survival. However, within days of Mawson's arrival, the Antarctic winter began.

Mawson's expedition hut was located close to what was then the location of the South Magnetic Pole, and continued radio interference and static associated with polar conditions threatened the base's minimal ability to contact Macquarie Island. The expedition leader at first admired Jeffryes's assiduity with earphones and Morse-code key, but grew increasingly guarded in his praise. In Mawson's words, Jeffryes "applied himself to work with enthusiasm and perhaps an over-conscientious spirit." Climate conditions outside the hut made winter outdoor exercise impossible, leading to cabin fever. All the expeditioners would have been familiar with tales of Antarctic winter madness and particularly the problems of the Belgian Antarctic Expedition. Conditions at Cape Denison were clearly worse than those on the Belgica due to the Katabatic wind which because of the unique geography is at its upper extreme in the vicinity.

In July 1913, as Antarctica neared midwinter, wireless operator Jeffryes began to present symptoms of paranoia to his fellow shore-party winter explorers, none of whom knew how to receive or transmit messages in Morse code. Expedition leader Mawson began to encourage another expedition member, airman Frank Bickerton, to learn Morse code as quickly as possible. Jeffryes's condition waxed and waned; for some weeks his comrades believed he was recovering, but in September of the same year the radioman experienced a psychotic break and began transmitting a message, through Macquarie Island, to Australia. Declaring himself to be the only sane man on the expedition, Jeffryes accused all of his comrades of having joined a criminal conspiracy to murder him. Mawson thereupon relieved Jeffryes of his duties. His mental condition was diagnosed as paranoid schizophrenia while he was confined to the Aradale Mental Hospital in Ararat, Victoria. Letters from the health center, written to Mawson in 1915, testify to his challenges. Little is known of his later life. He died under confinement in 1942.
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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by RogerE »

First-time visit to this thread. Fascinating — thanks to the
"usual suspects" for their contributions!

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Another attractive issue from Tuva's "Third Period": 1995 Hollywood Stars.

Tuva has little involvement with Hollywood, other than enjoying its productions, especially those with sub-titles. This set of ten stamps manages to include so many old and recent Big Names, who of course could never have assembled at one location together.
Image
Tuva 1995 Hollywood Stars, first issue.
Mirr D21 - D30.

Tuva was keen to make money from philatelists (like most governments today), and this issue is in the same vein as other "third period" stamps shown earlier in this thread, and are a direct appeal to movie enthusiasts, who would be expected to pay high prices for such a set honouring their deities.

And also to those of us who collect the early Tuva stamps, which we all assumed were a "completed" collection. (But now we need to start paying hugely for the new issues again, just like those folks "lucky" enough to collect exorbitant lands like Ghana, Uganda, Pitcairn, Guyana, and Togo.)
Wikipedia wrote:The Beatles (on the 50 roubles & 100 roubles stamps) were an English rock band formed in Liverpool in 1960. With a line-up comprising John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr, they are regarded as the most influential band of all time. The group were integral to the development of 1960s counterculture and popular music's recognition as an art form. Rooted in skiffle, beat and 1950s rock and roll, their sound incorporated elements of classical music and traditional pop in innovative ways; the band later explored music styles ranging from ballads and Indian music to psychedelia and hard rock. As pioneers in recording, songwriting and artistic presentation, the group revolutionised many aspects of the music industry and were often publicised as leaders of the era's youth and sociocultural movements.

Led by primary songwriters Lennon and McCartney, the Beatles built their reputation playing clubs in Liverpool and Hamburg over three years from 1960, initially with Stuart Sutcliffe playing bass. The core trio of Lennon, McCartney and Harrison, together since 1958, went through a succession of drummers, including Pete Best, before asking Starr to join them in 1962. Manager Brian Epstein moulded them into a professional act and producer George Martin guided and developed their recordings, greatly expanding their domestic success after their first hit, "Love Me Do", in late 1962. As their popularity grew into the intense fan frenzy dubbed "Beatlemania", the band acquired the nickname "the Fab Four", with Epstein, Martin and other members of the band's entourage sometimes given the informal title of "fifth Beatle".

By early 1964, the Beatles were international stars, leading the "British Invasion" of the United States pop market and breaking numerous sales records. They soon made their film debut with A Hard Day's Night (1964). From 1965 onwards, they produced increasingly innovative recordings, including the albums Rubber Soul (1965), Revolver (1966) and Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band (1967), and enjoyed further commercial success with The Beatles (also known as "the White Album", 1968) and Abbey Road (1969). In 1968, they founded Apple Corporation, a multi-armed multimedia corporation that continues to oversee projects related to the band's legacy. After the group's break-up in 1970, all four members enjoyed success as solo artists. Lennon was shot and killed in December 1980, and Harrison died of lung cancer in November 2001. McCartney and Starr remain musically active.
Wikipedia wrote:Leonardo da Vinci (on the 450 roubles stamp) (1452 – 1519), was an Italian polymath of the Renaissance whose areas of interest included invention, drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, science, music, mathematics, engineering, literature, anatomy, geology, astronomy, botany, paleontology, and cartography. He has been variously called the father of palaeontology, ichnology, and architecture, and is widely considered one of the greatest painters of all time (despite perhaps only 15 of his paintings having survived).

Born out of wedlock to a notary, Piero da Vinci, and a peasant woman, Caterina, in Vinci, in the region of Florence, Italy, Leonardo was educated in the studio of the renowned Italian painter Andrea del Verrocchio. Much of his earlier working life was spent in the service of Ludovico il Moro in Milan, and he later worked in Rome, Bologna and Venice. He spent his last three years in France, where he died in 1519.

Leonardo is renowned primarily as a painter. The Mona Lisa (shown on easel on the 450 rouble stamp) is the most famous of his works and the most popular portrait ever made. The Last Supper is the most reproduced religious painting of all time and his Vitruvian Man drawing is regarded as a cultural icon as well. Salvator Mundi was sold for a world record $450.3 million at a Christie's auction in New York, on 15 November 2017, the highest price ever paid for a work of art. Leonardo's paintings and preparatory drawings—together with his notebooks, which contain sketches, scientific diagrams, and his thoughts on the nature of painting—compose a contribution to later generations of artists rivalled only by that of his contemporary Michelangelo.

Leonardo is revered for his technological ingenuity. He conceptualized flying machines, a type of armoured fighting vehicle, concentrated solar power, an adding machine, and the double hull. Relatively few of his designs were constructed or even feasible during his lifetime, as the modern scientific approaches to metallurgy and engineering were only in their infancy during the Renaissance. Some of his smaller inventions, however, entered the world of manufacturing unheralded, such as an automated bobbin winder and a machine for testing the tensile strength of wire. He is also sometimes credited with the inventions of the parachute, helicopter, and tank.
but despite his interesting inventions, he didn't invent philately.

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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Another attractive issue from Tuva's "Third Period": 1997 Tropical Fish, Part Two. I call this the "Part Two series" of Fish, to distinguish it from the other set, shown here earlier.
Image
Tuva 1997 Fish, Part Two, 250 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Fish, Part Two, 450 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Fish, Part Two, 600 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1997 Fish, Part Two, 900 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Tuva was keen to make money from philatelists (like most governments today), and this issue is in the same vein as other "third period" stamps shown earlier in this thread, and are a direct appeal to tropical Fish hobbyists, who would be expected to pay high prices for such a set honouring their deities.

And also to those of us who collect the early Tuva stamps, which we all assumed were a "completed" collection. (But now we need to start paying hugely for the new issues again, just like those folks "lucky" enough to collect exorbitant lands like Ghana, Uganda, Pitcairn, Guyana, and Togo.)

Despite having no sea frontage, and being nowhere near the tropics, these stamps apparently sold well, as evidenced by the fact that this was the second fish series within a year. And when has ANY stamp-issuer cared about her issues not being relevant to the issuer land?

Wikipedia wrote:A marine aquarium is an aquarium that keeps marine plants and animals in a contained environment. Marine aquaria are further subdivided by hobbyists into fish only (FO), fish only with live rock (FOWLR), and reef aquaria. Fish only tanks often showcase large or aggressive marine fish species and generally rely on mechanical and chemical filtration. FOWLR and reef tanks use live rock, a material composed of coral skeletons harboring beneficial nitrogen waste metabolizing bacteria, as a means of more natural biological filtration.

Marine fishkeeping is different from its freshwater counterpart because of the fundamental differences in the constitution of saltwater and the resulting differences in the adaptation of its inhabitants. A stable marine aquarium requires more equipment than freshwater systems, and generally requires more stringent water quality monitoring. The inhabitants of a marine aquarium are often difficult to acquire and are usually more expensive than freshwater aquarium inhabitants.
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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by RogerE »

I browsed the biographical sketch for Leonardo da Vinci
in Panterra's post of [Thu Apr 02, 2020 16:58:45 pm], and
decided that it must refer to a stamp shown in an earlier
post. So I went back through all the earlier posts on p.3
and all the posts on p.2. But no post showed a stamp with
Leonardo's portrait...

Finally I read more carefully the biographical sketch for
Leonardo da Vinci. I discovered in the third paragraph
The Mona Lisa (shown on easel on the 450 rouble stamp)
is the most famous of his works.

Doh! A Homer Simpson moment! When all else fails, read the
instructions.
I looked again at the sheetlet shown in that very
same post, and there he is, and there she is:

Image

They are flanked by Marilyn Monroe, Michael Jackson and Charlie Chaplin.
How good to see him, modestly standing back amongst that crowd of
modern celebrities, the multitalented genius who would tower gigantically
above all of them if physical stature reflected mental stature.

I recalled a visit to the Louvre. There is a special gallery which contains just
one painting, the Mona Lisa. There is a security barrier in front of it to keep
visitors from getting too close. The crowd was dense and milling, layers deep,
many holding cameras on selfie sticks to see above those in front and take a
photo of that famous (but surprisingly small, 77x53cm) painting, to record that
they had been there, in its actual presence...

Meanwhile, in the long adjacent gallery the visitors hurried forward or back,
scarcely glancing at the rows of paintings on its walls. So much to see in the
world's largest art gallery, so little time to do it in a single visit. Few stopped
to really look, few realised they were barely glancing at the Portrait of a Young
Woman
(c.1495–99), the Madonna of the Rocks (c.1483–86), the Virgin with
Child and St. Anne
(c.1510–13), and John the Baptist (c.1505–13), a whole
parade of works by Leonardo himself. If only the crowds milling in front of
Mona Lisa had done their homework, they would not have missed the chance
to carefully inspect this host of other works by the very same master.

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Nice to hear your report on your visit to the Louvre, Roger! I hope you also enjoyed your reading through the interesting previous posts in this thread. It's great that all this information is preserved! Yes, Mister Leonardo must have felt right at home, being on the same stamp with those other celebrities.

And now, here is yet another attractive issue from Tuva's "Third Period": 1995 Orchids and Butterflies.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 225 roubles, Roelogyne ovalis.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 450 roubles, Miltonia clowesii.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 675 roubles, Restreppia cutulatta.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 900 roubles, Trichocenorum tigrinum.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 1,800 roubles, Paphiopedulum sukhakulii.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 2,100 roubles: Paphidpidilum spiceranum.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 2,100 roubles: Dendrobium phalaenopsis.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
Image
Tuva 1995 Orchids and Butterflies, 2,100 roubles: Dendrobium nobile.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.
A major design blunder on this set is including the Latin names for the orchids, but neglecting this for the butterflies!

Tuva was keen to make money from philatelists (like most governments today), and this issue is in the same vein as other "third period" stamps shown earlier in this thread, and are a direct appeal to orchid and butterfly philatelists, who make up a huge portion of the thematic collectors of the planet, and who would be expected to pay high prices for such a set honouring their deities.

And also to those of us who collect the early Tuva stamps, which we all assumed were a "completed" collection. (But now we need to start paying hugely for the new issues again, just like those folks "lucky" enough to collect exorbitant lands like Ghana, Uganda, Pitcairn, Guyana, and Togo.)


Wikipedia wrote:Dendrobium nobile, commonly known as the noble dendrobium, is a member of the family Orchidaceae. It has become a popular cultivated decorative house plant, because it produces colourful blooms in winter and spring, at a time when little else is in flower. It is also one of the 50 fundamental herbs used in traditional Chinese medicine, known as shí hú (Chinese: 石斛) or shí hú lán (Chinese: 斛兰). Dendrobium nobile is one of the most widespread ornamental members of the orchid family. Its blooms are variegated in colour, shading from white through pink and purple, and the many different cultivated varieties produce different sized and coloured blooms.

Dendrobium nobile is an epiphytic or lithophytic plant native to southern China (including Tibet), the Himalayas (India, Bangladesh, Assam, Nepal, Sikkim, Bhutan), and Indochina (Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, Vietnam). The species is also reportedly naturalized in Hawaii. It is the state flower of Sikkim.

Dendrobium nobile occurs in lowland and mountain forests, often on mossy limestone rocks. It has strap-shaped, persistent leaves, and blooms mostly in winter and spring. It produces short, 2 to 4 flowered racemes, fragrant, waxy, and highly variable in color, arising from the upper nodes of leafed and leafless canes.
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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by RogerE »

Attractive orchid and butterfly stamps Panterra.

But words are also worth discussing, as the carriers of information and knowledge.
May I comment on your post from that viewpoint?

I agree, the omission of the butterfly names is a deficiency in the design of those
stamps, given that the orchids are explicitly named. However, I take you up on the
terminology "Latin names", where you really mean scientific names. In fact, the
binomial scientific nomenclature, pioneered by Linnaeus (Carl von Linné, 1707–78),
is a mixture of Greek and Latin (including Latinate coinages of modern times).

A case in point: nobile is clearly Latin, but
The name Dendrobium is derived from the Ancient Greek words
dendron meaning "tree" and bios meaning "life", referring to the
epiphytic habit of most species.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dendrobium
which cites the source:
Brown, Roland Wilbur (1956). The Composition of Scientific Words.
Washington, D.C.: Smithsonian Institution Press.
Your Wikipedia information says that Dendrobium nobile is
...known as shí hú (Chinese: 石斛) or shí hú lán (Chinese: 石斛兰).
I can offer some relevant information. (Someone with better language
knowledge might correct any missteps I make here.)

兰花lánhuā, literally means blue flower; the combination is the usual term for orchid.
shí means stone.
石斛shíhú means dendrobium.
I do not know the meaning of by itself, but it might be a name
for a particular group of orchids. As Dendrobium nobile is lithophytic
and often grows on mossy limestone rocks, calling it shíhústone "hú"
would be appropriate.

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by isti80 »

Eli wrote:
Eli wrote: Could someone tell what he is making?

Image
Thanks, Panterra. I actually asked about the attached 3 Kopek red stamp. Do you have any idea what does he making? preparing food?
He is grinding grain.

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by RogerE »

Ahhh, nice clarification, thanks isti80.

I'm guessing this grain has quite small seeds, as what appears to
be the upper grindstone is not very large and heavy, as would
normally be used for large hard grains. What do others think?

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by isti80 »

I don't know what type of grain was available in Tuva. The material of grindstone is also depending on the region. I have even see "grindstone" from hardwood. If no stone is available it's still better than nothing.

Here is an old pic of a hand mill in Hungary.
Image

Istvan

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by RogerE »

Thanks isti80 for your follow-up comments and the photo of a
Hungarian lady with a hand-operated "grindstone". It certainly does
document that self-reliant method of producing flour. Do you
think the grain she would have been grinding would be wheat?
I wonder how long ago it was taken...

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Another attractive issue from Tuva's "Third Period": 1996 Stars of Hollywood.

Some folks will scoff at the small country of Tuva bothering to feature Hollywood legends in the far-off USA, but surely this is no more unusual than the many countries (both small and large) today producing sets featuring rock stars, Princess Diana, or Donald Trump. Any notable public figure is fair game!
Image
Tuva 1996 Stars of Hollywood.

100 roubles: Cafe wallpaper.
150 roubles: Back of car, Marilyn Monroe's head.
225 roubles: Elvis Presley's head.
300 roubles: Front wheel of sportscar, James Dean's head.
450 roubles: Grill of sportscar, Humphrey Bogart's face from nose up.
675 roubles: Cafe wallpaper with guitars, ear and back of Bogart's head.
900 roubles: Cafe wallpaper, left end of bar table.
1,000 roubles: Marilyn Monroe from shoulders down, holding drink in hand, Elvis' hand in front of sundae.
1,200 roubles: Elvis' chin and shirt, white coffee mug.
1,500 roubles: James Dean from nose down, meal on plate, white mug.
2,100 roubles: Bogart's mouth (arguably his most important body part!) and both arms, beer bottle.
2,400 roubles: Bogart's shoulder and back.


Not listed in the Backman catalogue.

Tuva was keen to make money from philatelists (like most governments today), and this issue is in the same vein as other "third period" stamps shown earlier in this thread, and are a direct appeal to Hollywood fans, who would be expected to pay high prices for such a set honouring their deities.

And also to those of us who collect the early Tuva stamps, which we all assumed were a "completed" collection. (But now we need to start paying hugely for the new issues again, just like those folks "lucky" enough to collect exorbitant lands like Ghana, Uganda, Pitcairn, Guyana, and Togo.)
Wikipedia wrote:Elvis Aaron Presley (January 8, 1935 – August 16, 1977), also known simply as Elvis (225 roubles stamp), was an American singer, dancer and actor. Regarded as one of the most significant cultural icons of the 20th century, he is often referred to as the "King of Rock and Roll" or simply "the King". His energized interpretations of songs and sexually provocative performance style, combined with a singularly potent mix of influences across color lines during a transformative era in race relations, led him to great success—and initial controversy.

Presley was born in Tupelo, Mississippi, and relocated to Memphis, Tennessee, with his family when he was 13 years old. His music career began there in 1954, recording at Sun Records with producer Sam Phillips, who wanted to bring the sound of African-American music to a wider audience. Presley, on rhythm acoustic guitar, and accompanied by lead guitarist Scotty Moore and bassist Bill Black, was a pioneer of rockabilly, an uptempo, backbeat-driven fusion of country music and rhythm and blues. In 1955, drummer D. J. Fontana joined to complete the lineup of Presley's classic quartet and RCA Victor acquired his contract in a deal arranged by Colonel Tom Parker, who would manage him for more than two decades. Presley's first RCA single, "Heartbreak Hotel", was released in January 1956 and became a number-one hit in the United States. With a series of successful network television appearances and chart-topping records, he became the leading figure of the newly popular sound of rock and roll.

In November 1956, Presley made his film debut in Love Me Tender. Drafted into military service in 1958, Presley relaunched his recording career two years later with some of his most commercially successful work. He held few concerts, however, and guided by Parker, proceeded to devote much of the 1960s to making Hollywood films and soundtrack albums, most of them critically derided. In 1968, following a seven-year break from live performances, he returned to the stage in the acclaimed television comeback special Elvis, which led to an extended Las Vegas concert residency and a string of highly profitable tours. In 1973, Presley gave the first concert by a solo artist to be broadcast around the world, Aloha from Hawaii. Years of prescription drug abuse severely compromised his health, and he died suddenly in 1977 at his Graceland estate at the age of 42.
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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by RogerE »

Hello Panterra. May I cheekily comment that two stamps with
white coffee mugs as their main subject suggests the possibility
of a thematic/topical collection, or at least a subject collection.
Athird stamp, with a beer bottle as its main subject, could either
expand the theme/topic/subject, or start a new one. (Actually,
I expect that "beer" is a theme/topic/subject already having a
keen collector following).

A further take-away comment: I think James Dean's "meal on a plate"
is a good ole' hamburger. Makes me remember the "hamburger with
everything" that we used to be able to get from traditional cafés in
Australia before the American fast-food-chain models captured the
Australian market, and replaced "hamburger with everything" by
"whopper" or "quarter-pounder" or "two all-beef patties, special sauce,
lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions — on a sesame seed bun" (and 940mg
of sodium = 63% of recommended daily intake for an adult).

We didn't know how good it was, 'til it all went away... :(

/RogerE

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by X163169X »

Image

TUVA 1994-1995, SECOND TUVAN STAMPS PERIOD, PART 1
Original exhibit title: TUVA 1994-1995, SECOND TUVAN STAMPS PERIOD, PART 1
Exhibit owner (author): Anders Backman, , Sweden
Registration number of the exhibit: 473
Version of the exhibit: 1
Number of pages: 42

Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image Image
DPRK, Mongolia, Vietnam and stamp with National Flag

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Period

Post by Panterra »

RogerE wrote:
29 May 2020 11:42
Hello Panterra. May I cheekily comment that two stamps with
white coffee mugs as their main subject suggests the possibility
of a thematic/topical collection, or at least a subject collection.
Athird stamp, with a beer bottle as its main subject, could either
expand the theme/topic/subject, or start a new one. (Actually,
I expect that "beer" is a theme/topic/subject already having a
keen collector following).

A further take-away comment: I think James Dean's "meal on a plate"
is a good ole' hamburger. . . ./RogerE
Yes Roger, you appear correct in guessing it is a hamburger on the plate. But despite examining the stamp carefully with my trusty magnifier, I didn't feel competent to hazard such a guess! And identifying the coffee mugs and beer bottle etc made me realise that such describing of tiny stamps is "all in a day's work" for stamp catalogue editors.

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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Another attractive issue from Tuva's "Third Period": 1996 Dogs.
tuva-96-dogs-2.jpg
Tuva 1996 Dogs, 150 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.

tuva-96-dogs-1.jpg
Tuva 1996 Dogs, 900 roubles.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.

tuva-96-dogs-MS.jpg
Tuva 1996 Dogs, full set in convenient sheetlet.
Not listed in the Backman catalogue.


Tuva was keen to make money from philatelists (like most governments today), and this issue is in the same vein as other "third period" stamps shown earlier in this thread, and are a direct appeal to canine enthusiasts, who would be expected to pay high prices for such a set honouring their deities.

And also to those of us who collect the early Tuva stamps, which we all assumed were a "completed" collection. (But now we need to start paying hugely for the new issues again, just like those folks "lucky" enough to collect exorbitant lands like Ghana, Uganda, Pitcairn, Guyana, and Togo.)
Wikipedia wrote:A conformation show, also referred to as a breed show, is a kind of dog show in which a judge, familiar with a specific dog breed, evaluates individual purebred dogs for how well the dogs conform to the established breed type for their breed, as described in a breed's individual breed standard.

Such shows are useful to breeders as a means of evaluating dogs for breeding purposes. A conformation championship from a recognised national kennel club is generally considered a reasonably objective indication of merit, as it indicates that the dog has been found to be a superior example of its breed by a number of different judges on a number of separate occasions. Many breeders consider championship a prerequisite for breeding.

The first modern conformation dog show was held in Newcastle upon Tyne, England, in June 1859, and the only breeds scheduled were pointers and setters.
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Re: Tuva Stamps - Second Period 1994-1995

Post by Panterra »

Panterra wrote:In 1942, despairing of any more help from Russia which was by now embroiled in a war with Germany, Tuva began printing its own stamps.

After failing to get a set for their 20th anniversary (as explained earlier in this thread), the Government asked for a set to celebrate the
21st anniversary of independence, and so the local printer carefully engraved a set of five stamps. But only three were finally issued.
Samuel Blekhman wrote:These stamps were designed by the artist V. Dyomin, who worked for the newspaper Тувинская Правда Tuvinskaia Pravda (Tuvinian Truth) in Kyzyl. The stamps were printed at this newspaper's printing works with a single cliché on slices of paper trimmed from the bottom of newspapers. Because of this, the distances between stamps are often different and one stamp is often out of position in relation to another.

The stamps of this series were found in normal postal use and were not on sale in the philatelic shops of the Soviet Union. Almost all of the print run of the stamps was exhausted for postal needs, and only an insignificant quantity of mint stamps, imported by collectors visiting Tuva in 1944-45, came into the hands of collectors.

V. Dyomin subsequently reprinted these stamps using the original clichés at the request of collectors on more than one occasion, sometimes in their normal colours, sometimes in other colours -- none of which were ever used for postage.
tuva-42-21st-anniv-Man-grn-reprint.jpg
Tuva 1942 21st Anniversary of Independence, Tuvan man, 25 kopecks, reprint in unissued GREEN colour.
Not listed in Backman or Mirr catalogues.
The 1942 21st anniversary set is extremely scarce, but the reprints in various fancy colours, made by Comrade Dyomin later to satisfy collector requests, are quite readily available. Here is the green version of the stamp featuring a Tuvan man, which was not issued with the 1942 set, but was included by Dyomin with the various-colour reprints.

I wonder if the man shown is Comrade Toka? If so, I can understand why he vetoed it!
Toka.jpg
Comrade Salchak Toka, ruler of Tuva from 1932 till his death in 1973.
Wikipedia wrote:Salchak Kalbakkhorekovich Toka (Салчак Калбакхорекович Тока, 15 December 1901 – 11 May 1973) was a Tuvan politician. He was General Secretary of the Tuvinian department of the CPSU from 1944 to 1973; previously, he was the General Secretary of the Central Committee of the Tuvan People's Revolutionary Party and was the supreme ruler of the Tuvan People's Republic from 1932 until its annexation by the Soviet Union in 1944.

He was a graduate of the Communist University of the Toilers of the East (Коммунистический университет трудящихся Востока) in Moscow. In 1929 the Tuvan head of state Donduk Kuular was removed from power and arrested by the Soviets. Meanwhile, five Tuvan graduates of the Communist University of the Toilers of the East were appointed commissars extraordinary to Tuva. Their loyalty to Stalin ensured that they would pursue policies, such as collectivization, that Donduk had ignored. A coup was launched in 1929. On 6 March 1932, Salchak Toka replaced Donduk as General Secretary of the Tuvan People's Revolutionary Party. After the execution of Donduk Kuular in 1932, Salchak Toka became the ruler of Tannu Tuva. He introduced a communist ideology after the Soviet model, the nomad agriculture was collectivised and the traditional religions (Tibetan Buddhism and Shamanism) were suppressed. A personal cult developed around him, and he was awarded numerous Soviet prizes for his literary works.

In 1940 he married Khertek Anchimaa, who was Chairwoman of the Little Khural. In 1944 he requested that Tannu Tuva should be annexed by the Soviet Union. The event took place on 30 October 1944 de jure via Mikhail Kalinin. Tuva was initially an autonomous oblast of the Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic (RSFSR) and starting from 10 October 1961 as the Tuvan Autonomous Soviet Socialist Republic (Tuva ASSR). Toka remained the General Secretary of the Tuvan department of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, up to his death in 1973.


As an aside, it is notable that Mrs Toka was Head of State from 1940 to 1944, and thus the first (non-hereditary) female Head of State on planet Earth! One can't help wondering if marital disagreements prompted her husband to seek the country's inclusion in the USSR. We may never know.

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Tuva Stamps - First, Second & Third Periods 1926-1999

Post by Panterra »

An attractive cover from the "First Period" of Tuva, back in 1926: The first definitive set, with the Wheel of Dharma.
cvr-27-d.jpg
Tuva 1926: Wheel of Dharma, several values on cover to Moscow, postmarked 8th February 1927.
Backman catalogue # 1 – 3, 5. SG 1 – 3, 5.
This cover is correctly franked at 28 kopecks, the rate for registered letters abroad. The address is that of the Soviet Philatelic Association, a state enterprise that sold stamps and covers abroad. Though the cover is undoubtedly philatelic, we are indebted to the SPA for creating many covers of the early issues of Tuva. Note the handwritten Mongolian and Russian translations of the address.
Khertek_Anchimaa-Toka.jpg
Mrs Toka, Tuva's Propaganda Chief and Head of State for several years.
Wikipedia wrote:Khertek Amyrbitovna Anchimaa-Toka (Хертек Амырбитовна Анчимаа-Тока, Tuvan: Анчимаа-Тока Хертек Амырбит уруу; 1 January 1912 – 4 November 2008) was a Tuvan/Soviet politician who in 1940–44 was the Chairwoman of the Little Khural (Parliament) of the Tuvan People's Republic, and the world's first non-hereditary female head of state. She was the wife of Salchak Toka, who was the republic's supreme leader from 1932 to 1973.

She was born in what is now Bay-Tayginsky District of Tuva, near the present day settlement of Kyzyl-Dag. Months earlier the collapse of the Qing Dynasty had led to the end of the nominal Chinese rule and the establishment of the independent Tannu Uriankhai under Mongolian and Tuvan nobility. Anchimaa was born the third child in a family of peasant hunters. In the spring of 1918 a smallpox epidemic in the region claimed her father and one of her sisters, leaving her mother to care for Anchimaa and her four other siblings alone. To help make ends meet, the six-year-old Anchimaa was fostered out to a more prosperous branch of the family.

A Russian protectorate was established over Tuva in 1914, however the region became a battleground in the Russian Civil War after 1917, where effective control over the territory and capital Belotsarsk changed between the Red Army and counter-revolutionary forces several times. However conservative forces in Tuva were defeated in 1920 and the People's Republic of Tannu Tuva was proclaimed on 17 August 1921. The new Soviet-backed government greatly increased education opportunities, and subsequently in a period where very few Tuvans, particularly women, were literate, Anchimaa managed to learn to write and read in the Mongolian language. At the age of 18, when the first national Tuvan alphabet was introduced, she was one of the first to learn it, and was subsequently recruited by the state to teach the language to others as a member of the Revolutionary Youth Union (Revsomol), the youth wing of the Tuvan People's Revolutionary Party (TNRP).

A year later, Anchimaa began working as a clerk and technical secretary for the Barun-Khemchiksky kozhuun, helping to oversee local economic production as well as continuing to work to eradicate illiteracy in the district. Her energy and success in these tasks brought her to the attention of the local party leadership. She was admitted to the TNRP and sent, among 70 others, to the Communist University of the Toilers of the East in Moscow, a journey of some 5,000 km. When asked by the university selection committee in Kyzyl "Where is Moscow?" as part of her initial assessment, Anchimaa admitted she didn't know but said "If you send me, I will know where it is." Apart from studying, students attended lectures of famous Soviet politicians; the meeting with Nadezhda Krupskaya is said to have affected Khertek greatly. Their education and living while in Moscow was completely funded by the state, however the education proved very challenging for the Tuvans sent due to their low level of basic education and requirement to become quickly fluent in Russian. Anchimaa was one of only 11 Tuvan students who ultimately graduated.

Upon her return in 1935, Anchimaa was one of several recent graduates of the University of the Toilers in the East to be placed in positions of political trust in the TNRP due to their political and administrative education in Moscow and their adherence to Stalinist ideology, beginning in 1935 when Anchimaa was put in charge of the propaganda department of Revsomol. In 1938 she became the director of Tuvan Zhenotdel (the section of the Party devoted to women's affairs), and Chair of the Women's Section of the Central Committee of the TNRP. In both these positions Anchimaa took a leading role in coordinating action for improving social and economic conditions for women, in particular the eradication of illiteracy and the promotion of employment and education opportunities for women in Tuvan society.


Anchimaa's education meant she had been absent during the height of the 'cultural revolution' of Tuva in the early 1930s, during which time the local nobility, lamas and Buddhist monasteries had much of their wealth and power stripped. Tuvan herds and agricultural endeavors were aggressively collectivized along the lines of the Soviet model, however the reforms proved deeply unpopular and were gradually reversed. However, Soviet interference in local matters was frequent, and the TNRP was successively purged to ensure its adherence to Stalinist ideology. The purges of 1932 had seen the fervently pro-Stalin Salchak Toka assume the party chairmanship of the TNRP after the execution of his predecessor Donduk Kuular. The Great Purge took root as well during the late 1930s, with operations mounted by the NKVD in the Tuvan Republic to expose 'right opportunists'. Leading 'counter-revolutionaries' and 'Japanese spies' exposed included Council of Ministers Chairman Sat Churmit-Dazhy and Chairman of the Presidium of the Little Khural Adyg-Tyulyush Khemchik-ool. As a leading party member, Anchimaa sat on the Special Court convened to investigate the charges, which unanimously found all nine defendants guilty and sentenced them to death. Though very small by comparison to the purges happening elsewhere in the Soviet Union, combined with summary arrests and executions by the NKVD, complete domination of the TNRP and the republic by pro-Moscow Stalinists was now assured.

In April 1940 Anchimaa became the Chair of the Presidium of the Little Khural, the head of state for the Tuvan People's Republic. In doing so she became the first female head of state in the modern era not to inherit the title. And she surpassed the achievement of fellow Communist Alexandra Kollontai, who had become the world's first female government minister in 1917. However, the Tuvan Republic's lack of diplomatic recognition, the scant information and reporting available outside the Soviet Union concerning the extremely isolated nation, Operation Weserübung and the imminent invasion of France meant that this milestone went unnoticed for some time. She would also hold the record as the longest serving non-royal female head of state until Vigdís Finnbogadóttir broke it in 1985. In 1940 she also married the General Secretary of the TNRP Salchak Toka. She retained her maiden name after marriage (which was very common among the communists and revolutionaries) and only changed it after her husband died in 1973. The marriage was of two of the Tuvan Republic's most powerful political figures, and together Anchimaa and Toka would dominate Tuvan politics for the next three decades.


As Chair of the Presidium she had an extensive correspondence with her equivalent Soviet colleague, Mikhail Kalinin. Her term coincided with the Great Patriotic War in which she took a leading role in mobilizing the resources and manpower of the republic to assist the Soviet Union in defending from the German invasion. Within two years over 200 volunteers had joined the Red Army and the republic's economy was entirely dedicated to serving the cause of the war. Tuvan orientation towards Moscow intensified during the war, with Cyrillic script replacing the Latin alphabet for the writing of Tuvan, Russification of social and economic practices, and virtually all opposition to Stalinist policy eradicated. These trends culminated in 1944 in the petition, masterminded by Toka and Anchimaa, for the republic's annexation to become a constituent state of the USSR. The Soviets, desiring the mineral resources of the republic and a permanent end to Mongolian-Chinese geopolitical intrigues over the region, acceded to the request and the state formally ceased to exist in November 1944.

After that, the TNRP became a local branch of the CPSU, which Salchak Toka continued to lead. Anchimaa became the deputy chair of the executive committee of the Tuvan CPSU branch, maintaining a leading role in social affairs within Tuva and continuing her work on art and literacy. In 1962 she became vice-chairwoman of the Tuvan Council of Ministers, the number two position in the Tuvan Soviet government, being responsible for social welfare, health, education, culture, sports and propaganda.

She retired in 1972, acquired the family name "Anchimaa-Toka" after her husband's death in 1973 and led a quiet life until her death. Anchimaa-Toka died November 4, 2008 in Tuva. She was 96.
poster-1.jpg
The only surviving propaganda poster from independent Tuva, 1942.
25th Anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution. Thank you, Mrs Toka.
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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by RogerE »

Very nice registered cover dated of first issue stamps, cds Kizil Touwa 8-22 [= 22 Aug (1926)(?)], handstamp a (perhaps the only handstamp (?); if others, the next would presumably be b]. The Mongolian manuscript in red is especially elegant and attractive.

As for the propaganda poster celebrating the 25th anniversary of Russia's October Revolution, I note the bilingual labels on the carriages. Using the Russian as key, I've made a modest transcription:
.
.<br />Tuva 1942 propaganda poster (detail)
.
Tuva 1942 propaganda poster (detail)
.
Russian — English — Tuvan
хлеб [khleb] — bread — xleep
мясо [myaso] — meat — eet
шерсть [sherst'] — wool — tyk
.
/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Panterra »

Thanks for your translation of the signs on the train, Roger!

It is indeed curious that Tuva shows a train on that poster (as well as on a commemorative stamp of 1936) when they had no railways in the country! There is a railway far to the north in Siberia, however, but I am puzzled by the use of this symbolism.
36-jub-train-30k.jpg
Tuva 1936 15th Anniversary of Independence, 30 kopecks.

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Panterra »

Did Tuva issue stamps before 1926?

Philatelists understand the 1926 issue of Tuva (shown several times and on cover in this thread) with text and values in Mongolian vertical script, as being the first stamps of Tuva.

But the country dates its independence from 1921. So what stamps were used in the first five years?


There is evidence of Russian then Soviet stamps being used, and these are reported in Comrade Blekhman's book as being known cancelled with the first "Kizil Touwa" datestamp, as well as with the earlier Russian "Krasny Enis" datestamp.

Now I see what claim to be Tuva stamps pre-dating the 1926 issue. These are three mint Russian stamps with handstamped overprints TOUWA and the new value. The stamps are offered on Ebay by a prominent stamp dealer in Milan, Italy.

Link to these: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/88699-RUSSIA-USSR-STAMPS-Lot-of-3 ... SwbNlfIzkL

tuva-RSFSR-handstamped-3v.jpg
Tuva: conjectured early provisionals, overprinted on RSFSR issues and USSR R1.


What do folks think about these? Could they be genuine?

Evidence in favour is that the unusual spelling of the country name is the same as on the first postmark.

The time period of the basic stamps is correct: the two RSFSR stamps are from the 1921 series, a time of high inflation, while the R1 was issued in January 1924.


Evidence against is that none of these stamps have ever been reported in the past century, nor have any covers been seen.

The numbering machine used to print the numerals seems in remarkably tidy condition, as compared to usage of similar numbering machines in 1933 to create surcharges.

The Tannu Tuva Collectors' Society has never recorded these either.

The fact that the new country name overprint sits neatly at the top of the stamps (where it covers the word "Postage" which should surely not be covered) is unexpected, as surely the important thing for the independent state of Tuva would have been to obliterate the letters RSFSR.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Panterra »

Since we are considering the earliest stamps of Tuva, here is a photo of one of the earliest-known authenticated items I am aware of: a money-order telegram form from Kizil in December 1925, with the postmark reading Krasny, Yenisei Province. This is the same datestamp that was later altered to read Kizil Touwa, and is frequently seen on covers and used stamps of the first issue.

1925-telegram-form-KrasnyEnis.jpg
Tuva money-order telegram form, paid with USSR stamps, and postmarked Krasny, Enis, 3rd December 1925.


This illustration is taken from Samuel Blekhman's book, The Postal History and Stamps of Tuva, from 1976. An English translation (but without the colour photos) was published by the Tannu Tuva Collectors' Society in 1997.

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by faro »

Panterra wrote:
26 Sep 2020 04:20
Did Tuva issue stamps before 1926?

Philatelists understand the 1926 issue of Tuva (shown several times and on cover in this thread) with text and values in Mongolian vertical script, as being the first stamps of Tuva.

But the country dates its independence from 1921. So what stamps were used in the first five years?


There is evidence of Russian then Soviet stamps being used, and these are reported in Comrade Blekhman's book as being known cancelled with the first "Kizil Touwa" datestamp, as well as with the earlier Russian "Krasny Enis" datestamp.

Now I see what claim to be Tuva stamps pre-dating the 1926 issue. These are three mint Russian stamps with handstamped overprints TOUWA and the new value. The stamps are offered on Ebay by a prominent stamp dealer in Milan, Italy.

Link to these: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/88699-RUSSIA-USSR-STAMPS-Lot-of-3 ... SwbNlfIzkL

Image
Tuva: conjectured early provisionals, overprinted on RSFSR issues and USSR R1.


What do folks think about these? Could they be genuine?

Evidence in favour is that the unusual spelling of the country name is the same as on the first postmark.

The time period of the basic stamps is correct: the two RSFSR stamps are from the 1921 series, a time of high inflation, while the R1 was issued in January 1924.


Evidence against is that none of these stamps have ever been reported in the past century, nor have any covers been seen.

The numbering machine used to print the numerals seems in remarkably tidy condition, as compared to usage of similar numbering machines in 1933 to create surcharges.

The Tannu Tuva Collectors' Society has never recorded these either.

The fact that the new country name overprint sits neatly at the top of the stamps (where it covers the word "Postage" which should surely not be covered) is unexpected, as surely the important thing for the independent state of Tuva would have been to obliterate the letters RSFSR.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
The seller in question has a good number of items priced into four digits. If they thought these were genuine they'd surely be asking more than "only" £82?

I can't see how the overprinted values might fit into a chronology... 14, up to 5,000 then back down to 24? The overprint setting of country name on the first two differs from the third, and this wasn't the official name until 1926 (Tannu Tuvan People’s Republic from 1921, Tuvan People's Republic later).

Or, indeed why/when any overprinting on those stamps might've happened - a longer period is implied but this is difficult to see in the context of changing international relationships.

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Princestamps »

Great thread and saw them tonight as Panterra spoke about them to us at the WEST AUCKLAND PHILATELIC
SOCIETY.

Panterra has an incredible knowledge of all things Tuvan and we saw a range of high quality earlies and many of the later "thematical" issues. :lol:

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by RogerE »

Thanks for letting us know, Princestamps :D

Good work Bruce = Panterra. Sharing your knowledge, your collection and your enthusiasm
makes life more enjoyable for many.

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Princestamps »

I love the overuse of the cliche "Who would pay a high price for a set that honours their deities" maybe but they would expect better quality that cheaply printed and badly produced Russian fantasies.

Some of those 3rd period stamps are just ugly - sorry but not my cup of tea.

Also yesterday I was quite disturbed at the cruelty to animals depicted on the earlier stamps such as the fox being impaled from the back, a fish screaming as its speared, a reindeer lassooed and a bear impaled with a spear.

I was laughed at - where is the love for the wild animals of the Russian taiga. :lol:

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Panterra »

Yes, it was a great evening at the Stamp Club! As well as showing my entire Tuva collection, I began with a short movie on Tuva, which included the sporting events (including horse racing and Mongolian wrestling) at the Naadym Festival.

The film also included a small section of animated movie done by me some years ago, when I became inspired by the similar work of the great Kiwi artist Len Lye. This only lasted about one minute, as making direct film at 24 frames per second is rather taxing!

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by RogerE »

Bruce: What about archery? And does throat singing count as a sport? (I presume there are contests, at least.)

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Panterra »

Yes, throat-singing (Khoomey) is important in Tuva, and has even been celebrated with a stamp issue, back in Tuva's greatest-ever stampiferous year of 1995:

Image
Tuva 1995 International Khöömei Symposium, 500 roubles.
Backman # 197.

Tuva had this stamp printed in China, in sheets of 48.
90,000 perforated and 10,000 imperf stamps were printed.

Wikipedia wrote:Overtone singing – also known as overtone chanting, khöömei, or throat singing – is a type of singing in which the singer manipulates the resonances created in the vocal tract, in order to produce a melody.

From a fundamental pitch, made by the human voice, the belonging harmonic overtones can be selectively amplified by changing the shape of the resonant cavities of the mouth, larynx, and pharynx. This resonant tuning allows singers to create more than one pitch at the same time (the fundamental and one or more selected overtones), while actually generating only a single fundamental frequency with their vocal folds.

Each note is like a rainbow of sound. When you shoot a light beam through a prism, you get a rainbow. You think of a rainbow of sounds when you sing one note. If you can use your throat as a prism, you can expose the rainbow – through positioning the throat in a certain physical way, which will reveal the harmonic series note by note.
Image
Postcard promoting the movie made about the 1995 International Khöömei Symposium in Tuva, "Genghis Blues".
Click here to view the short trailer of the fantastic movie on the symposium.
It won the Sundance 1999 Audience Award, and has won many other awards.
Wikipedia wrote:Tuvan overtone singing is practiced in the Republic of Tuva (southern Siberia, Russia) and it's called Khöömei.

The Tuvan way of singing overtones is based on appreciation of complex sounds with multiple layers or textures: that's how the Tuvans developed a wide range of rhythmic and melodic styles during the centuries.

Most of the styles are sung with "korekteer" (korek = chest, teer = to sing. Literally "to sing with chest voice"), and the main ones are:


Khöömei
Sygyt
Kargyraa
(which also uses a second sound source made by false vocal folds. This technique is called "false-folds-diplophony")

And other special sub-styles like:

Borbangnadyr,
Chylandyk,
Dumchuktaar,
Ezengileer.
Byrlang
(a unique type of vibrato, mainly applied to khöömei and kargyraa styles)

The melodies are traditionally created by using harmonics number: 6th, 8th, 9th, 10th, 12th, 13th and sometimes the 16th, which form the major pentatonic scale, therefore the harmonics number 7 and 11 are carefully skipped.

The most peculiar melody, from Tuvan tradition, is "Artii Sayir", mostly performed in kargyraa style.
Paul Pena, from the movie "Genghis Blues", sings "Good Horses" in Tuva, with a Tuvan musician.

And archery is important at Naadym too, but more on that shortly.

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by RogerE »

Thanks Bruce = Panterra, a very informative post.

I'm looking forward to your followup post about archery :D

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Panterra »

More on Tuva's sporting events (including horse racing and archery)
at the Naadym Festival.


ᠶᠡᠬᠡ ᠪᠠᠶᠠᠷ ᠨᠠᠭᠠᠳᠤᠮ ᠤᠨ ᠦᠶ᠎ᠡ ᠳᠦ ᠰᠤᠷ ᠬᠠᠷᠪᠤᠭ᠎ᠠ
Archery during the Naadym Festival.

Wikipedia wrote:Archery

In this competition both men and women may participate. It is played by teams of ten. Each archer is given four arrows; the team must hit 33 "surs". Men shoot their arrows from 75 meters away while women shoot theirs from 65 meters away. Traditionally the archers wear their national clothing (Deel) during the competition. All the archers wear leather bracers up to the elbow on their outstretched arm, so that the deel’s cuff does not interfere with shooting.

Mongolian archery is unique for having dozens of surs as targets. Each sur is a small woven or wooden cylinder. They are placed on top of each other forming a wall three-high, which is approximately 8 inches high by 5 feet wide. Knocking a sur out of the wall with an arrow counts as a hit, though knocking a sur out of the centre will bring a competitor more points. When the archer hits the target, the judge says uuhai which means "hooray". After each hit, an official repairs the damaged wall and makes it ready for the next attempt. The winners of the contest are granted the titles of "national marksman" and "national markswoman".




tuva-36-jub-70k.jpg
Tuva 1936 Jubilee 70 kopecks, showing a scene at the Naadym Festival.
Archers in the foreground, while faintly in the background can be seen wrestling and horse-riding.
The violet postmark is normal on Tuva stamps, as the dye could not be removed (a problem with other colours.)



Wikipedia wrote:Naadam is the most widely watched festival among Mongols and is believed to have existed for centuries in one fashion or another. It has its origin in the activities, such as military parades and sporting competitions such as archery, horse riding and wrestling, that followed the celebration of various occasions, including weddings or spiritual gatherings. It later served as a way to train soldiers for battle and was also connected to Mongols' nomadic lifestyle. Mongolians practice their unwritten holiday rules that include a long song to start the holiday, then a Biyelgee dance. Traditional cuisine, or Khuushuur, is served around the Sports Stadium along with a special drink made of horse milk (airag). The three games of wrestling, horse racing, and archery are recorded in the 13th-century book The Secret History of the Mongols. During the Qing dynasty's rule, Naadam became a festival officially held by sums. Now it formally commemorates the 1921 Revolution, when Mongolia declared independence from the Qing dynasty and coincides with Mongolian State Flag Day. Naadam also celebrates the achievements of the new state. It was celebrated as a Buddhist/shaman holiday until secularization in the 1930s under the Communist influence of the Soviet Union.

The biggest festival (National Naadam) is held in the Mongolian capital, Ulaanbaatar, during the National Holiday from July 11 to 13, in the National Sports Stadium. It begins with an elaborate introduction ceremony featuring dancers, athletes, horse riders, and musicians. After the ceremony, the competitions begin. The competitions are mainly horseback riding. Naadam is also celebrated in different regions of Mongolia and Inner Mongolia in July and August. In the Tuva Republic, Naadam is on 15 August.

Secret-hist-of-the-Mongols.png
The Secret History of the Mongols. c. 1242 EV



Why are wrestling and archery so important to Tuvans and Mongols?
Wikipedia wrote:Wrestling is the most important of the Mongolian culture's historic "Three Manly Skills", that also include horsemanship and archery. Genghis Khan considered wrestling to be an important way to keep his army in good physical shape and combat ready. The court of the Qing Dynasty (1646–1911) held regular wrestling events, mainly between ethnic Manchu and Mongol wrestlers.
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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by RogerE »

Thanks Panterra, your follow-up post did not disappoint! :D

/RogerE :D

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Re: Tuva Stamps – First (1926-43) and Second (1994-5) Periods

Post by Panterra »

I would be very nervous having the job at the archery contest of "repairing the wall of target surs", as you never know if a random shooter might fire off an arrow while you were standing in front of the target!



tuva-96-capex-2400.jpg
Tuva 1996 Capex: every Tuvan's second-favorite possession*:
her/his horse!



* after her/his stamp collection!

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