Stamperija article in The Economist

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CollectorColin
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Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by CollectorColin »

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This article about Stamperija appeared in the Middle east and Africa section of this week's Economist in the UK.


IMG_0851Econ.jpg
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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by saifbeg »

Like I have said many times in the past here on different topics, where this has come up, that these stamps are both good for the country that has a legal and valid contract with entities such as Stamperija. As the article maintains, many of these poorer countries do not have the funding available to produce their own stamps. Many already struggle with day to day life and the running of governments than having to worry what to would produce next month in terms of stamps.

Once the country has stabilized to an extent then should they worry about the printing of stamps and the cancelling of contracts.

While snobby collectors may shun away from them terming them "wallpaper" or "Jam Jar" stamps, true collectors from the Global South (or Third World) would rather be accepting of them as collecting topics because they may have more of an understanding of what a country is going through than a retired White European person in their AC, climate controlled living room or basement in Europe or America.

I for one, accept this and would rather have Stamperija produce their stamps than under the directorship of their former colonial masters. Those would be more valid than the colonial, orientalist, and frankly racist drivel that the French or British produced, when they were their colonial domains, or might produce through the lens of colonial insight and ambitions.

As the Sierra Leone postal worker said "It is willing buyer, willing seller so whats the problem?" I whole heartedly agree with him.

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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by mozzerb »

I can sympathise with the view that if you're the CAR or Sierra Leone, you might well be happy to take the money and have the stamps provided for no effort other than signing a contract (it's not a new phenomenon, after all -- Seebeck was doing much the same sort of thing in the 19th century as Stamperija are doing now). And as the frankly ludicrous annual total for GB stamps given in the article suggests, they're not the only countries doing it.

On the other hand, the suggestion that this is more valid from an anti-colonialist viewpoint is ... rather a strange argument. The stamp subjects are almost entirely aimed at the interests of the Western countries that were doing the colonising, and Stamperija themselves are unlikely to have any concern for the interests of the countries involved beyond what they can make from them.

And even collectors from the Global South presumably want to know whether the stamps being sold are actually being used as stamps, or are simply produced by the contractors on their own initiative.

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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by satsuma »

saifbeg wrote:
23 Aug 2020 06:27
....

As the Sierra Leone postal worker said "It is willing buyer, willing seller so whats the problem?" I whole heartedly agree with him.
The problem, as I see it, is that such stamps do nothing to promote the country to international tourism.
The C.A.R. has waterfalls aplenty, national parks with uncommon species, megalithic architecture, 8000 years of cultural heritage etc etc.

One of the ways a country can improve its economy is by encouraging inbound tourism.
https://www.tripadvisor.com/Attractions-g293776-Activities-Central_African_Republic.html

It seems to me, that one inbound tourist is going to do more for the economy, than any collector of the "Global South" will do in a lifetime.

It may well be that there is an inability to produce stamps internally. There is however, the ability to make contract conditions that include depiction of local customs, culture, fauna, and landscapes pre-requisite subject matter.

Even a poor country can arrange to send suitable digital images to Stamperija if that company is incapable of sourcing them itself.

Whether the volume produced has any relevance to the countries internal requirements is another matter entirely.

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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by britjag »

I’d like the Marilyn Monroe/drag queen issue!

That’s hilarious.

Has there been a “great moments in American soccer issue”? Didn’t think so.

I’d also like to see a Donald Trump administration set of former officials charged with criminal offenses.

If you’re going to turn out crap, let’s make it fun and absurd crap!
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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by HalfpennyYellow »

The problem with Stamperija & similar entities is that the excessive number of issues probably have a negative impact on 'one country collections' of their client countries, killing off the prospects of collectors attempting to have a complete country.

When a country is issuing 500-1000+ stamps a year, who would be willing to purchase them all for the sake of having a complete country?

This also applies to countries who issue excessive numbers of stamps without being clients to an entity like Stamperija. Japan comes to mind: according to Stampworld, between 1871 and 2009 the country issued 5160 stamps, but between 2010 and 2019 it issued 4822 stamps, ie. in a 10-year period they issued almost as many stamps as they had in their previous 138 years of issuing stamps.
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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by jps55liquefy »

britjag wrote:
23 Aug 2020 08:58
I’d like the Marilyn Monroe/drag queen issue!

That’s hilarious.
Not Marilyn Monroe but impersonated by Jimmy James
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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by Mitgar62 »

CollectorColin wrote:
23 Aug 2020 03:17
This article about Stamperija appeared in the Middle east and Africa section of this week's Economist in the UK.
Image
This reminds me I should set up my online account, as my copy usually arrives 4-5 days late here in the US.

Even 268 stamps a year is too many. This is why my UK collection more or less cuts off in early 2001. I cut off my Japan in 2007 for much the same reason.

Despite what the Economist says, I wonder how much of this revenue is actually going to the countries involved, and how much of what does get there goes anywhere other than someone's pockets.

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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by britjag »

Jimmy James is hot! (In a Marilyn sort of way).

Lo-lo-lo-lo -la! (What a great Kinks song).

Not that I want to encourage this sort of thing (I mean crap stamp issues), but is this issue still available?

Fun thing to have just for the curiosity value.
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Re: Stamperija article in The Economist

Post by DJCMH »

HalfpennyYellow wrote:
23 Aug 2020 09:15
The problem with Stamperija & similar entities is that the excessive number of issues probably have a negative impact on 'one country collections' of their client countries, killing off the prospects of collectors attempting to have a complete country.

When a country is issuing 500-1000+ stamps a year, who would be willing to purchase them all for the sake of having a complete country?

This also applies to countries who issue excessive numbers of stamps without being clients to an entity like Stamperija. Japan comes to mind: according to Stampworld, between 1871 and 2009 the country issued 5160 stamps, but between 2010 and 2019 it issued 4822 stamps, ie. in a 10-year period they issued almost as many stamps as they had in their previous 138 years of issuing stamps.
For most of the current Stamperija clients my guess s that there are very few one-country colectors to begin with, in part due to previous dalliances with stamp agencies in the past that issued what many considered "too many stamps" per year.

However, the masses of topical collectors who will collect everything and anything even quasi-philatelic are gold mines to be tapped, which is exactly the target market of Stamperija and all the big philatelic agencies of the past half century.
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